New shows

Backstrom

Backstrom

C

Better Call Saul

Better Call Saul

B+

Fortitude

Fortitude

B-

Battle Creek

Battle Creek

B+

Fresh Off the Boat

Fresh Off the Boat

B-

Odyssey

Odyssey

A-

Odyssey

A-

Premiere date: Sunday, April 5

Time: 10 on NBC

Ever sit around griping that the broadcast networks just can’t make shows as suspenseful, as relevant or as textured (translation: as good) as the premium cable networks? The excellent pilot episode of NBC’s new drama “Odyssey” might just shut you up for a while.

With a “Homeland”-style mastery of momentum and a “Traffic”-esque multi-narrative premise, “Odyssey” passes the biggest test of all when it comes to trying out new TV shows in today’s glut of offerings: As soon as the first episode was over, I was eager to see more. Anna Friel (“Pushing Daisies”) stars as Sgt. Odelle Ballard, part of an elite group of American soldiers who invade a jihadist compound in North Africa and discover that one of the fighters they’ve killed is a top al-Qaeda operative. And look — here’s his laptop, with records of some very American-looking bank transfers. A squad of private American security officers intervenes and takes the laptop, but Ballard made a copy on a flash drive.

Later that night, her team is ambushed and killed — but she escapes, even though the cable news networks are already reporting her death. Meanwhile (“Odyssey” is entirely built around the word “meanwhile”), a corporate lawyer and former U.S. attorney (“Nurse Jackie’s” Peter Facinelli) who is assigned to work on a big merger becomes suspicious about certain high-level transactions he’s uncovered. Meeeeanwhile, a trust-fund kid (Jake Robinson) who is part of the Occupy movement meets a hacktivist who may have discovered that an American corporation is funding the jihadists. Somehow (of course) it all links together, as will these three characters; the getting-there looks to be the fun part.

Battle Creek

B+

Premiere date: Sunday, March 1

Time: 10 on CBS

Created by Vince Gilligan (“Breaking Bad”) and David Shore (“House M.D.”), this quirky police drama is a welcome step in a different direction for CBS, where the cops (and the crimes) usually have preset personalities and the plots hew strictly to format.

Not so in Battle Creek, Mich. (population 51,000), even though “Battle Creek” is in many ways a familiar sort of procedural about a mismatched set of crime-solvers. Gilligan and company have imagined a local police department hamstrung by broken equipment (everything from wonky wiretaps to zapless tasers), where an ambitious but dejected lead detective named Russ Agnew (Dean Winters — you may know him as “Mayhem” from the Allstate ads) keeps begging for more and better resources. (Did the Battle Creek PD somehow miss out on its share of the Patriot Act spending spree? Have they not tried “civil forfeiture” as a means of raising cash?)

Help is on the way, Russ’s commander (Janet McTeer) assures him: It comes in the form of FBI agent Milt Chamberlain (Josh Duhamel), a sharp-dressed Dudley Do-Right who has been reassigned from Washington to help clean up crime in ... well, in Battle Creek. Detective Agnew bristles with jealousy as his colleagues and superiors fawn over Agent Chamberlain. Paired together, rivalry gets in their way, with each man acting on entirely different instincts. Judging only the pilot episode, the banter between them can be fun and Gilligan’s influence lends a nice, creepy sheen to the notion that menace lurks anywhere, even (or especially?) in the upper Midwest.

Better Call Saul

B+

Premiere date: Sunday, Feb. 8

Time: 10; moves to Mondays on Feb. 9 on AMC

The two-night, two-episode premiere of “Better Call Saul,” the new series from “Breaking Bad” creator Vince Gilligan and producer/writer Peter Gould, is right in line with the tone and style of the original, now-classic series. And like its predecessor, “Better Call Saul” raises more questions in two hours than it will readily answer, which means “Breaking Bad” fans will soon realize that their favorite rock has rolled all the way to the bottom of the hill.

In this prequel story, set six years prior to the events of “Breaking Bad,” we meet James “Jimmy” Morgan McGill (Bob Odenkirk), a desperately under-employed Albuquerque lawyer eking out a living by taking cases as a public defender at the courthouse, where, at the end of each day, he is hassled by — can it really be? — Mike Ehrmantraut (Johnathan Banks), a parking booth attendant who won’t accept Jimmy’s incorrectly validated ticket.

As a sad sack, Jimmy is not yet the criminally connected sleazeball who will (somehow) become the legendary Saul Goodman, but the elements are all certainly present. His more successful older brother, Chuck (Michael McKean), a partner at a big law firm, had to quit working because of a mental illness that has left him with a severe technophobia of all things electric; it’s up to Jimmy to care for Chuck and try to recover the millions he feels the law firm owes his brother.

I’ll spare you more details, since all you really need to know is this: It isn’t too long before Jimmy/Saul is bound and gagged and thrown to the desert ground under a big, blue sky dotted with clouds — and “Breaking Bad” fans are home. The instant the duct tape is ripped off his mouth by his captors, a certain Saul-ness kicks in and Odenkirk’s talent is on full display as Jimmy delivers a pleading, philosophical monologue on — among other things — the awful nature of revenge. It’s a beautiful, even melodious act of BS-ing.

Fortitude

B-

Premiere date: Sunday, Jan. 29

Time: 10 on Pivot

This icy (in more ways than one) 12-part mystery thriller from creator Simon Donald (“Low Winter Sun”) begins unevenly with a two-hour premiere that raises a few too many questions without quite enough incentive to stay and learn the answers. In the small Arctic Circle island village of Fortitude (population 713), where the polar bears outnumber citizens four to one, a melting glacier has revealed the perfectly preserved carcass of a prehistoric beast. (Thanks, climate change!)

That discovery may or may not be related to Fortitude’s first-ever murder (and a rather grisly one at that), an event that exposes the curious customs and culture of a community that spends most of its year in darkness.

An agreement between Oslo and London regarding the nationality of crime victims leads to the arrival of a British detective (Stanley Tucci, whose character is actually American, which gets its own explanation), whose assistance in the case is rebuffed by the town’s shady sheriff (Richard Dormer). There’s a similar chill from Fortitude’s governor (Sofie Grabol), who is more worried that the crime will detract from her ambitious plans to build a luxury hotel inside the glacier.

Add to this another half-dozen or so subplots and it’s difficult to know whether “Fortitude” aims to be a “Broadchurch on Ice” or, at its most extreme, a riff on John Carpenter’s “The Thing.” In its favor, the show has an irresistible setting (it was filmed in Iceland) that reminds me of the way New Zealand was a star player in SundanceTV’s “Top of the Lake.” “Fortitude’s” frozen aesthetic is a powerful lure, enough to keep a viewer entertained while the story finds its way.

Fresh Off the Boat

B-

Premiere date: Wednesday, Feb. 4

Time: 8:30 and 9:30; moves to Tuesdays at 8 on Feb. 10 on ABC

Based on a humorous memoir by restaurateur and D.C. native Eddie Huang, this single-camera sitcom from creator Nahnatchka Khan (“Don’t Trust the B---- in Apt. 23”) is set in the mid-1990s as 12-year-old Eddie’s family moves to Orlando, where his father, Louis (Randall Park, fresh off the role of Kim Jong Un in a movie you may have heard of called “The Interview”), has opened a country-western-themed steakhouse.

Eddie (Hudson Yang) heads off to his new school togged out in one of his many oversize T-shirts emblazoned with the images of hip-hop stars, certain in his belief that songs about the thug life speak to the outsider in every kid. The first few episodes of “Fresh Off the Boat” are largely devoted to predictably blunt examples of pop-culture absorption and actual cultural dissonance. To avoid cafeteria ridicule, Eddie persuades his mother, Jessica (Constance Wu), to go the grocery store to buy him “white people’s lunch” — a.k.a. Oscar Mayer Lunchables — to take to school rather than a container of her homemade noodles.

“Fresh Off the Boat” (which is narrated by the grown-up Huang himself) seems determined to play up its most obvious jokes, terrified that viewers might get bored once the kid stops swaggering around to Notorious B.I.G. and Ol’ Dirty Bastard songs. (In fact, Wu’s character — with her Tiger Mom instincts and Stephen King fixation — has much more potential for laughs.)

“Fresh Off the Boat” wants to be both “Black-ish” and “The Goldbergs” — and it works fairly okay as a companion piece to either — but it’s a lot better show when it occasionally stops going for just the easy jokes and aims for a subtler, sharper line of comment.

Backstrom

C

Premiere date: Sunday, Jan. 22

Time: 9 on Fox

Rainn Wilson, forever remembered as “The Office’s” opportunistic misanthrope Dwight Schrute, returns in this one-hour drama as Everett Backstrom, a demoted Portland police detective who is given a conditional chance to return to murder investigation. After a miserable physical exam (at which Backstrom is dinged for his diet, blood pressure, smoking habit and everything else), the police department’s doctor says what Backstrom really needs to do is make a friend.

No can do. As is made clear over and over (ad nauseum), Backstrom is impenetrably dour and antisocial, making no attempt to censor his politically incorrect opinions about the people around him. Imagine a show in which a far less lovable Oscar the Grouch solves murders, and you start to get the idea. In the first couple of episodes, this permanent personality flaw is perhaps not as watchable as “Backstrom’s” creator (“Bones’s” Hart Hanson) might have hoped. The comedy that’s supposed to flow naturally (Hanson calls the genre “crimedy”) seems stuck on the page, and, despite Wilson’s best efforts to lend the character dimension, Detective Backstrom is not as delightfully, darkly complicated as other cloudy-day antiheroes played by Hugh Laurie on “House M.D.” or even Greg Kinnear on last year’s short-lived “Rake.”

Backstrom is mostly just a jerk, which is supposed to dovetail with his ironic gift as a sleuth; by seeing the worst in people, he is uncannily skilled at linking motives and killers. The exteriors overplay Portland’s constant gloomy rain (it’s the wettest crime show since “The Killing”), but a couple more episodes might offer a ray of hope as the writers start to find ways to turn Backstrom into a person you’d want to spend an hour with each week.

What else is on

“Galavant”

Sundays

8 on ABC

Sincere and goofy musical mini-series follows a heartsick knight (Joshua Sasse) who seeks revenge on the sniveling king (Timothy Omundson) who stole his girlfriend. Through Jan. 25.

“Marvel’s Agent Carter”

Tuesdays

9 on ABC

It’s a “Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.” spinoff; Hayley Atwell reprises her role as Agent Peggy Carter from the “Captain America” films. Premiered Jan. 6.

“Empire”

Wednesdays

9 on Fox

Drama about a hip-hop record label impresario (Terrence Howard) who, after a terminal illness diagnosis, must decide who will take over his business. Premiered Jan. 7.

“Babylon”

Thursdays

10 on SundanceTV

A six-episode workplace comedy about London police officers. Stars James Nesbitt (“The Missing,” “The Hobbit”) and Brit Marling. Premiered Jan. 8.

“All About Sex”

Saturdays

11 on TLC

The network’s first-ever late-night talk show, hosted by Margaret Cho, Heather McDonald, Marissa Jaret Winokur and Tiffanie Davis Henry. Premiered Jan. 10.

“Togetherness”

Sundays

9:30 on HBO

Another dramedy about vaguely unhappy married and single people living in Los Angeles. But this one has some charms if you stick with it. Premiered Jan. 11.

“Eye Candy”

Mondays

10 on MTV

Drama series about a 21-year-old hacker (Victoria Justice) who has “a gift for seeing clues and connections in the digital world that others can’t.” Premiered Jan. 12.

“Friends to Lovers ?”

Mondays

10 on Bravo

New reality series follows several pairs of friends who are trying to figure out if they should be a couple. Premiered Jan. 12.

“Kate Plus Eight”

Tuesdays

9 on TLC

Who ordered five more consecutive specials about the Gosselin brood? Premiered Jan. 13.

“My Big Fat Fabulous Life”

Tuesdays

10 on TLC

Reality series about Whitney Thore, a former dancer who once weighed 110 pounds and now weighs nearly 400. Premiered Jan. 13.

“Married at First Sight: The First Year”

Tuesdays

9 on FYI

This spinoff reality series checks in with two couples who got married sight unseen last year. Premiered Jan. 13.

“Mikie Saves the Date”

Tuesdays

10 on FYI

Another reality series about a wedding planner. Premiered Jan. 13.

“Wrestling With Death”

Tuesdays

10 on WGN

Reality series about an Arkansas family that runs a funeral home by day and wrestles by night. Premiered Jan. 13.

“Man Seeking Woman”

Wednesdays

10:30 on FXX

Comedy series about a naive guy (Jay Baruchel) who endures a series of disappointments and hallucinatory moments in his search for a permanent relationship. Premiered Jan. 14.

“Rock This Boat: New Kids on the Block”

Wednesdays

8 on Pop

The first show from Pop — formerly known as the TV Guide Network — follows the 1980s boy band as they take their most devoted fans on a cruise across the Sea of Desperation. Premiered Jan. 14.

“The Story Behind”

Wednesdays

9 on Pop

This one-hour documentary series looks back at the making of some recent but already-classic hit TV shows. Subjects on deck include “Everybody Loves Raymond,” “ER” and “Friends.” Premiered Jan. 14.

“Breaking Point”

Thursdays

10 on Investigation Discovery

From the creator/producer of “Intervention,” this new series follows street criminals who don’t know they’re about to be confronted by family, friends and a trained counselor who will offer them a choice: therapy or jail time. Premiered Jan. 15.

“Outrageous Births”

Thursdays

9 on Discovery Life

First series premiere on Discovery Life (formerly Discovery Fit & Health) explores true accounts of births that didn’t go quite as planned. Premiered Jan. 15.

“50 Ways to Kill Your Mother”

Thursdays

10 on Discovery Life

Daredevil Baz Ashmawy takes his 70-year-old mother along on adventures that test her courage — skydiving, alligator wrestling, etc. Premiered Jan. 15.

“Twelve Monkeys”

Fridays

9 on Syfy

Based on the 1995 film, Aaron Stanford stars as Cole, a man from a post-apocalyptic, disease-ridden future who tries to use an untested form of time travel to undo the disaster. Premiered Jan. 16.

“Bella and the Bulldogs”

Saturdays

8 on Nickelodeon

Tween sitcom about a cheerleader whose throwing talents lead her to become the starting quarterback of her middle school’s football team. Premiered Jan. 17.

“Masterpiece Mystery: Grantchester”

Sunday, Jan. 18

10 on PBS

Six-part murder mystery series based on James Runcie’s novel “Sidney Chambers and the Shadow of Death.” James Norton (“Happy Valley”) stars as the Rev. Sidney Chambers, a handsome Episcopal priest who sets out to solve a murder in his parish in the peaceful village of Grantchester.

“Light Girls”

Monday, Jan. 19

9 on OWN

Documentary film from the creator of “Dark Girls” continues a discussion of the experiences of black women based on their lighter skin tone.

“The Nightly Show With Larry Wilmore”

Monday, Jan. 19

11:30 on Comedy Central

“Daily Show” correspondent Wilmore takes over the spot vacated by “The Colbert Report.”

“President Obama’s State of the Union address”

Tuesday, Jan. 20

9

The leader of the free world tries out some new material on a tough crowd.

“Open Heart”

Tuesday, Jan. 20

9 on TeenNick

A new drama for Nickelodeon’s TeenNick channel about a 16-year-old girl who comes from a family of doctors and uses the access she has as a hospital youth volunteer to look into the mystery of her father’s disappearance.

“Best New Restaurant”

Wednesday, Jan. 21

10 on Bravo

Hosted and judged by Tom Colicchio, this competition series features 16 restaurants competing for the title of “best new restaurant,” an editorial feature in Bon Appetit and $100,000.

“The Mistress”

Wednesday, Jan. 21

10 on Discovery Life

Reality series. Sarah Symonds, self-proclaimed former mistress of Gordon Ramsay, intervenes in the lives of women who are mistresses and need help figuring out how to put an end to the affair and move on.

“World’s Worst Mom”

Thursday, Jan. 22

9 on Discovery Life

Reality series tries to get some high-strung moms to relax their grip on their kids and let them thrive on their own.

“Nightwatch”

Thursday, Jan. 22

10 on A&E

Reality series follows New Orleans emergency responders on the overnight shift.

“Million Dollar Food Critic”

Thursday, Jan. 22

10 on BBC America

Reality/food series. London Times restaurant critic Giles Coren, who brags that his restaurant reviews can mean a million dollars in lost/gained business to proprietors, samples meals from five U.S. restaurants and then picks one for his “million-dollar review.”

“Half Like Me”

Thursday, Jan. 22

10 on Fusion

Documentary special. Al Madrigal (“The Daily Show”) takes viewers on a personal journey into the lives of people who are half-Latino and half-white.

“American Masters: Ricky Jay — Deceptive Practices”

Friday, Jan. 23

9 on PBS

A profile of the legendary magician.

“Love, Lust or Run”

Friday, Jan. 23

9 on TLC

Makeover expert/psychologist Stacy London (“What Not to Wear”) returns with a new show that helps women turn their fashion look “from WTF to WOW.”

“63rd Annual Miss Universe Pageant”

Sunday, Jan. 25

8 on NBC

The eternal question remains: How can she be “Miss Universe” if other galaxies never send a contestant?

“Sons of Liberty”

Sunday, Jan. 25

9 on History

A three-night, six-hour scripted miniseries set at the beginning of the American Revolution. Ben Barnes, Ryan Eggold, Michael Raymond-James and others play our nation’s hunky upstarts. Continues Monday and Tuesday.

“Sag Harbor”

Sunday, Jan. 25

10 on OWN

One-hour documentary looks at the historically significant African American beach community, which has struggled to retain its identity in a recent real-estate boom.

“Night Will Fall”

Monday, Jan. 26

9 on HBO

After Allied forces liberated Nazi concentration camps, the British Ministry of Information, with direction by Alfred Hitchcock, took harrowing newsreel footage and made a documentary called “German Concentration Camps Factual Survey.” This film explores the impact of those images. (Presented in conjunction with International Holocaust Remembrance Day on Jan. 27.)

“Strange Inheritance”

Monday, Jan. 26

9 on Fox Business

Docu-series explores the seldom-discussed world of people who inherited their wealth.

“Independent Lens: A Path Appears”

Monday, Jan. 26

10 on PBS

Building on their work from “Half the Sky,” journalists Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn are joined by celebrities interested in eradicating worldwide gender inequality. Part 1 of 3.

“American Experience: Edison”

Tuesday, Jan. 27

9 on PBS

Documentary about the life of America’s most famous inventor.

“Breaking Greenville”

Thursday, Jan. 29

10:30 on truTV

A “comedic docu-soap” that purports to chronicle the rivalry between two local news stations in Greenville, Miss.

“Super Bowl XLIX”

Sunday, Feb. 1

6:30 on NBC

If you’re into that sort of thing...

“Foyle’s War”

Monday, Feb. 2

streaming on Acorn TV

Not a new show, but this World War II-era British mystery series is moving from PBS to Acorn TV streaming with three new episodes.

“American Experience: The Big Burn”

Tuesday, Feb. 3

9 on PBS

Documentary inspired by Timothy Egan’s best-selling book about a disastrous wildfire that swept across the Northern Rockies in 1910 and shaped U.S. fire-prevention policy for the next century.

“Street Art Throwdown”

Tuesday, Feb. 3

9 on Oxygen

Competition series hosted and judged by Justin Bua pushes 10 accomplished streets artists to their physical and creative limits. Winner gets $100,000.

“Allegiance”

Thursday

10 on NBC

This new drama series has what sounds like some envy for FX’s “The Americans”: An idealistic CIA agent (Gavin Stenhouse) learns that his parents (Scott Cohen and Hope Davis) were Soviet spies back in the day.

“White Water”

Saturday, Feb. 7

8 on TV One

Movie. In 1963, a 7-year-old boy in segregated Alabama becomes obsessed with tasting the water that comes out of drinking fountains marked for white people only.

“The Jinx: The Life and Deaths of Robert Durst”

Sunday, Feb. 8

8 on HBO

This six-part docu-series by Andrew Jarecki (“Capturing the Friedmans”) is a seven-year investigation into the strange life of real-estate scion Robert Durst, who was acquitted of murdering a neighbor in 2001 but was also questioned in the 2000 murder of a writer who was friends with his wife, who vanished in 1982.

“Schitt’s Creek”

Wednesday, Feb. 11

10 on Pop

This comedy series stars Eugene Levy and the great Catherine O’Hara as a rich couple who’ve lost their fortune and are left only with ownership of a small town called Schitt’s Creek.

“The Slap”

Thursday, Feb. 12

8 on NBC

Limited series (directed by “Olive Kitteridge’s” Lisa Chodolenko) about a family that comes unglued after an incident at a 40th birthday party. Stars Peter Sarsgaard, Uma Thurman, Thandie Newton, Melissa George, Zachary Quinto and Thomas Sadoski.

“Style By Jury”

Friday, Feb. 13

9:30 on TLC

New fashion-advice series brings in “repeat offenders” of fashion crimes, where they face judgment from a jury of their peers.

“Saturday Night Live 40th Anniversary Special”

Sunday, Feb. 15

8 on NBC

Strap in for a three-hour, star-studded retrospective of the immeasurably influential “SNL.” A must-see for lifelong fans.

“The Book of Negroes”

Monday, Feb. 16

8 on BET

A three-night miniseries based on a novel about a West African woman (Aunjanue Ellis) who is kidnapped by slave traders in the 18th century and taken to America, where she eventually begins an epic journey to secure her freedom.

“The Odd Couple”

Thursday, Feb. 19

8:30 on CBS

New comedy update of the Neil Simon classic, starring Matthew Perry and Thomas Lennon. (Followed by the final episode of “Two and a Half Men.”)

“American Masters: August Wilson — The Ground On Which I Stand”

Friday, Feb. 20

9 on PBS

Portrait of the influential playwright and activist.

“Cesar Millan: Viva Las Vegas!”

Friday, Feb. 20

9 on Nat Geo Wild

The dog whisperer’s Vegas act.

“87th Annual Academy Awards”

Sunday, Feb. 22

7 on ABC

Snacks ready? It’s Oscar night. Already!

“Outlaw Country”

Tuesday, Feb. 24

10 on WGN America

Docu-series follows small-town law enforcement in Buckner, Mo., through the eyes of brothers Mike and Steve Cook, who serve as the police chief and head of the local crime task force.

“Good Witch”

Saturday, Feb. 28

8 on Hallmark Channel

An original series starring Catherine Bell as a do-good witch with a teenage daughter who shares her mom’s abilities.

“Secrets and Lies”

Sunday, March 1

9 on ABC

In this new drama that’s been “Gracepoint”-ed from a hit Australian TV series, Ryan Phillippe stars as a man who finds a boy’s body in the woods and soon becomes a suspect in the death. Co-stars Juliette Lewis.

“The Last Man on Earth”

Sunday, March 1

9 on Fox

Two-episode premiere of this half-hour, post-apocalyptic comedy starring Will Forte in the title role, an average guy who appears to be the only person left.

“CSI: Cyber”

Wednesday, March 4

10 on CBS

The newest series in the popular procedural franchise stars Patricia Arquette (“Medium,” “Boyhood”) as the head of the FBI’s online-crime division.

“American Crime”

Thursday, March 5

10 on ABC

In this gritty drama that ABC hopes might work as an anthology series like “True Detective,” a community is shaken and divided by the murder of a young couple. Felicity Huffman (“Desperate Housewives”) and Timothy Hutton (“Leverage”) star.

“Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt”

Friday, March 6

on Netflix

Originally meant for NBC’s midseason, this Tina Fey/Robert Carlock-produced comedy now moves to a two-season deal on Netflix. Ellie Kemper (“The Office,” “Bridesmaids”) stars as a woman starting her life over in New York after years living in an off-the-grid doomsday cult.

“My Own Man”

Friday, March 6

on Netflix

As he’s about to become a father to an infant son, filmmaker David Sampliner sets off on a quest to better understand the mysteries of manhood and masculinity.

“Hear No Evil”

Saturday, March 14

8 on TV One

A freak accident brings the world of sound to a hearing-impaired teenager, but what is initially regarded as a blessing unleashes chaos in her life.

“The Royals”

Sunday, March 15

10 on E!

Hour-long drama series (a first for E!) stars Elizabeth Hurley as Queen Helena, a modern-day British monarch. Joan Collins plays the Queen Mum. The story centers around drama, secrets and scandal in the palace.

“Going Clear: Scientology and the Prison of Belief”

Monday, March 16

9 on HBO

Filmmaker Alex Gibney (”Taxi to the Dark Side”) continues the work of journalist Lawrence Wright’s best-selling book, profiling eight former Scientologists.

“One Big Happy”

Tuesday, March 17

9:30 on NBC

A lesbian named Lizzy (Elisha Cuthbert from “Happy Endings”) and her straight friend Luke (Nick Zano) make good on a deal to create a baby together if neither one of them is married by 30. Then he falls in love with a loud British woman (Kelly Brook) and marries her — but Lizzy’s already pregnant. So it’s official: Just about everyone from “Happy Endings” wound up in something not nearly as funny.

“iZombie”

Tuesday, March 17

9 on The CW

Dry-witted drama series about a medical examiner (Rose McIver) who becomes a zombie, which she tries to keep secret. By nibbling on the brains of murder victims who pass through her morgue, she keeps her desiccation at bay and is also able to “see” their final thoughts, which offer clues to how they died.

“Bloodline”

Friday, March 20

on Netflix

A cross between a family drama and a psychological suspense thriller, this new series (from the creators of “Damages”) is set in the Florida Keys. A black-sheep son (Ben Mendelsohn) returns home, and the situation deteriorates from there. Cast includes Kyle Chandler (“Friday Night Lights”), Sissy Spacek and Sam Shepard.

“The Late Late Show With James Corden”

Monday, March 23

12:35 on CBS

British actor Corden, 36, takes over the job vacated by Craig Ferguson.

“Big Time in Hollywood, FL”

Wednesday, March 25

10:30 on Comedy Central

Series about two brothers who have delusions that they are serious filmmakers. Their parents kick them out, forcing them to fend for themselves for the first time.

“Cancer: The Emperor of All Maladies”

Monday, March 30

on PBS

This documentary series is a biographical history of cancer, directed by Barak Goodman, based on the book by Siddhartha Mukherjee. (Executive-produced by Ken Burns.)

“The Dovekeepers”

Tuesday, March 31

9 on CBS

Two-night event series, based on Alice Hoffman’s historical novel about the siege of the Masada in 70 A.D.

“Weird Loners”

Tuesday, March 31

9:30 on Fox

New ensemble comedy about four single people in their mid-30s (Becki Newton, Zachary Knighton, Nate Torrence and Meera Rohit) who wind up sharing a townhouse in Queens.

“Younger”

Tuesday, March 31

10 on TV Land

New series from “Sex and the City” creator Darren Star stars Sutton Foster (“Bunheads”) as a 40-year-old woman who says she is 26 in order to get a job and must now pull it off. Co-stars Hillary Duff and Debi Mazar.

“Masterpiece: Wolf Hall”

Sunday, April 5

on PBS

A six-episode adaptation of two of Hilary Mantel’s acclaimed novels (“Wolf Hall” and “Bringing Up the Bodies”), about the rise of Thomas Cromwell (and death of Sir Thomas More) during Henry VIII’s reign in the 1500s.

“A.D.”

Sunday, April 5

9 on NBC

Twelve-hour miniseries from Mark Burnett and Roma Downey (“The Bible”) about the people whose lives were changed after the death of Jesus.

“Daredevil”

Friday, April 10

on Netflix

The streaming network joins the superhero biz. Stars Charlie Cox (“Boardwalk Empire”) as Matt Murdoch, a blind lawyer whose heightened senses help his nighttime gig as crimefighter.

“The Messengers”

Friday, April 10

9 on The CW

Drama series about five people whose lives are altered by the impact of a meteor. It turns out they are now angels of the apocalypse and it’s up to them to prevent Satan (a.k.a. “The Man”) from triggering a malevolent rapture.

“MTV Movie Awards”

Sunday, April 12

9 on MTV

Live from L.A.’s Nokia Theatre; hosted this year by Amy Schumer.

“American Experience: Last Days in Vietnam”

Tuesday, April 28

9 on PBS

Rory Kennedy’s documentary about the chaos that took over during the American evacuation of Saigon in 1975.

“Kurt Cobain: Montage of Heck”

Monday, May 4

9 on HBO

Produced by Frances Bean Cobain, the first fully authorized documentary about the Nirvana singer, with access to archives of recordings, artwork, personal footage and more.

“Grace and Frankie”

Friday, May 8

on Netflix

A new comedy starring Lily Tomlin and Jane Fonda as two women whose husbands ran off together.

“Wayward Pines”

Thursday, May 14

9 on Fox

In this 10-part suspense drama based on Blake Crouch’s best-selling books, Matt Dillon stars as a Secret Service agent searching for two agents who went missing in the mysterious town of Wayward Pines, Idaho. He soon finds himself trapped in a “Twilight Zone”-like realm from which he can’t escape. Co-stars Terrence Howard, Melissa Leo, Carla Gugino, Toby Jones and Juliette Lewis. First episode is directed by M. Night Shyamalan, who is also an executive producer on the show.

“Late Show With David Letterman”

Wednesday, May 20

11:35 on CBS

Dave’s last show.

“Texas Rising”

Monday, May 25

on History

Three-night, eight-hour miniseries about the Texas Revolution and the rise of the Texas Rangers, starring Bill Paxton (as Gen. Sam Houston), Ray Liotta, Jeffrey Dean Morgan and Olivier Martinez (as Santa Anna). From the people who brought us “Hatfields & McCoys.”

“Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell”

on BBC America

A series based on Susannah Clarke’s novel.

“The Whispers”

on ABC

A paranormal drama.

“Killing Jesus”

on National Geographic

A dramatization of Bill O’Reilly’s best-seller.

“Odd Mom Out”

on Bravo

A scripted comedy.

“The Expanse”

on Syfy

A futuristic conspiracy thriller.

“Cucumber” and “Banana”

on Logo

Two matching dramas from the creator of “Queer as Folk” which explore the life of a British man and his younger friends.

Returning this season

Still worth a look

“The Amazing Race”

Wednesday, Feb. 25

9:30 on CBS

“American Idol”

Wednesday, returned Jan. 7

8 on Fox

“ The Americans”

Wednesday, Jan. 28

10 on FX

“Archer”

Thursdays, returned Jan. 8

10 on FX

“The Bachelor”

Mondays, returned Jan. 5

8 on ABC

“Banshee”

Fridays, returned Jan. 9

10 on Cinemax

“Bates Motel ”

Monday, March 9

9 on A&E

“Black Sails”

Saturday, Jan. 24

9 on Starz

“Bones”

Thursday, March 26

8 on Fox

“The Blacklist”

Sunday, Feb. 1

post-Super Bowl on NBC

“Broad City”

Wednesdays, returned Jan. 14

10:30 on Comedy Central

“Broadchurch”

Wednesday, March 4

10 on BBC America

“Call the Midwife”

Sunday, March 29

8 on PBS

“Celebrity Apprentice”

Sundays, returned Jan. 4

9 on NBC

“Comedy Bang! Bang!”

Fridays, returned Jan. 9

11 on IFC

“Community”

Tuesday, March 17

streaming on Yahoo

“Cougar Town”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 6

10:30 on TBS

“Downton Abbey”

Sundays, returned Jan. 4

9 on PBS

“Duck Dynasty”

Wednesdays, returned Jan. 7

9:30 on A&E

“Episodes”

Sundays, returned Jan. 11

10:30 on Showtime

“The Fall”

begins streaming on Jan. 16

on Netflix

“The Following”

Monday, March 2

8 on Fox

“Friday Night Tykes”

Tuesday, Jan. 20

9 on Esquire

“Game of Thrones”

Sunday, April 12

9 on HBO

“Geneology Roadshow”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 13

on PBS

“Girls”

Sundays, returned Jan. 11

9 on HBO

“Glee”

Fridays, returned Jan. 9

9 on Fox

“The Haves and the Have Nots”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 6

9 on OWN

“Helix”

Fridays, returned Jan. 16

10 on Syfy

“Hell’s Kitchen”

Tuesday, March 3

8 on Fox

“House of Cards”

begins streaming Feb. 27

on Netflix

“House of Lies”

Sundays, returned Jan. 11

10 on Showtime

“Inside Amy Schumer”

date to be announced

on Comedy Central

“Justified”

Tuesday, Jan. 20

10 on FX

“Kroll Show”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 13

10:30 on Comedy Central

“Looking”

Sundays, returned Jan. 11

10 on HBO

“Love Thy Neighbor”

Wednesdays, returned Jan. 7

9 on OWN

“Mad Men”

Sunday, April 5

10 on AMC

“The Musketeers”

Saturdays, returned Jan. 17

9 on BBC America

“Mythbusters”

Saturdays, returned Jan. 10

9 on Discovery

“The Night Shift”

Monday, Feb. 23

10 on NBC

“Nurse Jackie”

Sunday, April 12

9 on Showtime

“Outlander”

Saturday, April 4

9 on Starz

“Parks and Recreation”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 13

8 on NBC

“Restaurant Startup ”

Tuesdays, returned Jan. 13

10 on CNBC

“Shameless”

Sundays, returned Jan. 11

9 on Showtime

“Shakespeare Uncovered”

Friday, Jan. 30

on PBS

“Silicon Valley”

Sunday, April 12

10:30 on HBO

“Sirens”

Tuesday, Jan. 27

10 on USA

“Suits”

Wednesday, Jan. 28

10 on USA

“Survivor”

Wednesday, Feb. 25

8 on CBS

“Turn: Washington’s Spies”

date to be announced

on AMC

“Ultimate Survival Alaska”

Sundays, returned Jan. 4

9 on National Geographic

“Undateable”

Tuesday, March 17

9 on NBC

“Veep”

Sunday, April 12

10:30 on HBO

“Vice”

Friday, March 6

11 on HBO

“Vikings”

Thursday, Feb. 19

10 on History

“Wahlburgers”

Wednesdays, returned Jan. 7

10 on A&E

“The Walking Dead”

Sunday, Feb. 8

9 on AMC

“Workaholics”

Wednesdays, returned Jan. 14

10 on Comedy Central

Photos: Backstrom: Sergei Bachlakov/Fox, Fortitude: A Tiger Aspect Production/Fifty Fathoms Production for Sky Atlantic and Pivot, Fresh Off the Boat: Bob D'Amico/American Broadcasting Companies, Inc., Battle Creek: Cliff Lipson/CBS, Better Call Saul: Ursula Coyote/AMC, Odyssey: Virginia Sherwood/NBC

Design and production by Emily Chow, Caitlin Moore, Mitch Rubin and Veronica Toney.

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