New shows

Quarry

Quarry

A

Fleabag

Fleabag

A-

Insecure

Insecure

A-

Divorce

Divorce

B+

Good Girls Revolt

Good Girls Revolt

B+

High Maintenance

High Maintenance

B+

This Is Us

This Is Us

B+

Timeless

Timeless

B+

American Housewife

American Housewife

B

Designated Survivor

Designated Survivor

B

The Exorcist

The Exorcist

B

The Great Indoors

The Great Indoors

B

Pitch

Pitch

B

Speechless

Speechless

B

Frequency

Frequency

B-

Falling Water

Falling Water

C+

Graves

Graves

C+

Lethal Weapon

Lethal Weapon

C+

MacGyver

MacGyver

C+

Westworld

Westworld

C+

The Good Place

The Good Place

C

Conviction

Conviction

C-

No Tomorrow

No Tomorrow

C-

Bull

Bull

D+

Pure Genius

Pure Genius

D+

Kevin Can Wait

Kevin Can Wait

D

Son of Zorn

Son of Zorn

D

Berlin Station

Berlin Station

D-

Man With A Plan

Man With A Plan

F

Notorious

Notorious

F

Quarry

A

Premiere date: Friday, Sept. 9

Time: 10 on Cinemax

Nothing’s better for a TV critic than falling in love with a show that didn’t sound like much on paper. Cinemax’s lean and mean new eight-episode drama “Quarry,” based on Max Allan Collins’s crime novels, is about Mac Conway (“Prometheus’s” Logan Marshall-Green), a Marine who comes home to Memphis from Vietnam in 1972 and finds little opportunity for a veteran of an unpopular war — so he reluctantly becomes a hired gun for an enigmatic crime boss who calls himself The Broker (Peter Mullan).

See? Describing “Quarry” only makes it sound like one more cable drama about a difficult man drawn into a world of despicable, murderous people. Created and written by Michael D. Fuller and Graham Gordy (with Greg Yaitanes as showrunner/director), “Quarry” instead comes to life as soon as you turn it on, with a heartbreaking sense of soul, a strong ear for dialogue and an array of supporting players (including “Justified’s” Damon Herriman) who lend the show an impressive degree of grit, gallows humor and suspense.

Marshall-Green, however, delivers a superb performance as the emotionally and mentally wounded Mac; he is matched scene for smoldering scene by Jodi Balfour, who plays his wife, Joni. Moreover, the show’s set direction and period details are impressively flawless, whether depicting the ’70s-era blues-rock scene and riots over school busing, or the small things, down to the pull tabs ripped off beer cans and the Scripps-Howard lighthouse logo on the front page of the Memphis Press-Scimitar.

“Quarry’s” knack for conveying moral ambiguity and its mastery of setting remind me of another very good show that took forever to catch on: It was about a cancer-stricken chemistry teacher in Albuquerque who started cooking meth to make money. Don’t wait for the buzz that may or may not arrive — move “Quarry” to the top of your watch list now.

Fleabag

A-

Premiere date: Friday, Sept. 16

Time: on Amazon streaming

British writer and actor Phoebe Waller-Bridge plays the title role in this funny, highly profane but surprisingly poignant dramedy (originally a stage play) about a sexually compulsive woman in London.

At first, Waller-Bridge’s character (we only ever know her as Fleabag) seems to exist as a vessel for satirical prurience, constantly breaking the fourth wall to deliver a cutting insight about sex or the men she’s having it with. Bit by bit, we begin to see how her habits (not merely sexual) affect her relationships with her successful older sister, Claire (Sian Clifford), her ex-boyfriend (Hugh Skinner), her father (Bill Paterson) and her mean-spirited stepmother (“Broadchurch’s” Olivia Colman). More deeply, Fleabag is still grieving the death of her best friend and business partner, Boo (Jenny Rainsford), with whom she owned a small cafe that is about to go under.

“Fleabag” is only six episodes long (just like another fiercely funny, London-set Amazon comedy, “Catastrophe”), but story-wise, it accomplishes as much or more as most premium cable comedies do in 10 episodes. Romping along with our protagonist/narrator, we begin to see the fragility behind her vicious wit and uninhibited personality; Waller-Bridge masterfully portrays someone who pretends to live without shame while being quietly consumed with guilt. At a silent, all-female yoga retreat with her sister, Fleabag is irresistibly tempted to spy on a men’s workshop next door, where the participants work out their misogynistic feelings by yelling “SLUT!” at a female effigy. It’s as if they’re calling out her name. “Fleabag” starts off like a dirtier “Bridget Jones’s Diary,” but it soon develops into a more nuanced and heartbreaking (still humorous) novella about a person trying to find her truest self.

Insecure

A-

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 9

Time: 10:30 on HBO

Almost as fun as watching Issa Rae’s pointed and endearing HBO comedy “Insecure” will be watching as white critics, cultural observers and other television connoisseurs fall over themselves (and their words) to “explain” it. Even HBO treads clumsily in press materials for the show, saying it “touches on a variety of social and racial issues that relate to the contemporary black experience.”

Well, duh. But enjoying the show doesn’t have to be complicated. What’s happened is that the TV biz has finally (and meaningfully) begun to correct a lack of diversity behind the camera as well as in front of it; this fall adds a few other dramas and comedies (including Donald Glover’s FX comedy, “Atlanta”) that feel like a step in the right direction, so long as we don’t overthink (or oversell) it. At its best, “Insecure” doesn’t try to be groundbreaking. It’s about black people in the southern part of L.A. County (think Inglewood, not Compton) the way “Curb Your Enthusiasm” is about white Jews in West L.A. — whatever culture-specific jokes you don’t get, you’ll grasp by context and feel smarter for it.

Rae plays a character called Issa who works at an insipidly named nonprofit organization (“We Got Y’all), which helps minority teenagers; Issa is the only black person among a staff of woefully insensitive white people who think they’re doing the world a big favor. Her best friend, Molly (Yvonne Orji), is a successful law-firm associate trying too hard to nab the qualified, eligible man that suits her notion of success. While Molly hunts, Issa is bored by her long-term boyfriend, Lawrence (Jay Ellis), and begins a flirtatious relationship with an old flame.

See, I told you: “Insecure” is simple, funny and authentic. Who needs another 2,000 words to say so?

Divorce

B+

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 9

Time: 10 on HBO

With its dreary winter setting and poisonously mean mood, “Divorce” is sure to be a letdown for some viewers, particularly fans of Sarah Jessica Parker’s “Sex and the City” era of fizz and fun, which is, as this series makes sharply clear, far behind us. Once you’re over that hump, this 10-episode dramedy created by Sharon Horgan (one half of Amazon’s hilarious hit “Catastrophe”) begins to reveal itself as something more than just the doleful story of one couple’s dissolution.

Parker is terrifically on point as Frances Dufresne, whose husband, Robert (Thomas Haden Church), discovers that she’s been having an affair and kicks her out of the Hudson Valley, N.Y., house they share with their two children. He also throws her iPhone in the trash, which I keep pointing out to others as proof that “Divorce” is not set in the 1970s or ’80s — the show’s pallid tones and classic FM soundtrack can make it seem that it’s set in some pitiable past. Nope, it’s set in a pitiable now.

“Divorce” struggles at first with tone, leavened somewhat by comically absurd supporting characters (including “Saturday Night Live” alum Molly Shannon as a friend of Frances’s who pulls a gun on her own husband during a 50th birthday party). Another problem is Haden Church, who has been gifted and cursed with exactly one acting style, which, while initially grating, becomes an asset as a viewer begins to understand the depth of Robert’s insecurity and bluster. As Robert and Frances work through the stages of parting (counseling, mediation and acquiring venomous legal counsel), there are momentary — almost obligatory — glimmers by the sixth episode that love might prevail.

But who are we kidding? “Divorce” is best when it sticks to its title.

High Maintenance

B+

Premiere date: Friday, Sept. 16

Time: 11 on HBO

It’s interesting to see how pot humor, pot narratives and even pothead stereotypes evolve as laws against marijuana possession begin to ease. “High Maintenance,” an already well-regarded web series that has quietly upgraded to HBO (appropriately slotted after “Real Time With Bill Maher”), is a step in the right direction away from Cheech & Chong tropes, choosing instead to show the drug’s ubiquity — an almost banal occurrence in the lives of its users.

Created by husband-wife team Ben Sinclair and Katja Blichfeld, “High Maintenance” stars Sinclair as “The Guy,” an exceptionally laid-back New York weed dealer who makes bicycle deliveries to a diverse array of clients. The show is a series of vignettes about the customers — from an unhappy couple (Lee Tergesen and Amy Ryan) who break the rules of their swingers’ group; to a gay man (Max Jenkins) trapped by his co-dependent friendship with his female roommate (Helene Yorke); to a youth-seeking retiree (Peter Friedman) who lives downstairs from his uptight yuppie daughter and son-in-law. We meet elderly Chinese immigrants, a Muslim college student, a reclusive son grieving the loss of his sick mother, and a young woman who is ruinously obsessed with her social-media persona. One story is even told from the perspective of a dog who falls in love with its hired walker (Yael Stone).

The common thread, of course, is the marijuana, which neither increases nor decreases the happiness in its users; it’s simply another form of brief release from the human condition, which “High Maintenance” portrays with subtly observed skill. Near the end of this six-episode ride, we learn a little more about The Guy himself; beneath his hipster front, he’s carrying some pain, too.

This Is Us

B+

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 20

Time: 10 on NBC

Finally, a worthy proposal for the vacant lot where “Parenthood” once stood: “This Is Us,” from the writer and directors of the 2011 film “Crazy, Stupid, Love,” seems at first to be about a bunch of random people; they all share an important connection, but NBC really, really doesn’t want those of us who’ve seen the show to reveal it. I have every faith that viewers will figure it out for themselves within about 10 minutes of the first episode.

Milo Ventimiglia and Mandy Moore star as a married couple on the verge of becoming parents — her water breaks on his birthday. Speaking of birthdays, we meet Kevin (Justin Hartley), the often-shirtless beefcake star of a dreadful sitcom called “The Manny,” who is having existential doubts on his 36th birthday. His twin sister, Kate (Chrissy Metz), is down in the dumps, too, dragging herself to a support group for obese people where she meets a man named Toby (Chris Sullivan), who asks her out on her first date in ages. Meanwhile, in some other town, a successful businessman named Randall (Sterling K. Brown from “The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story”) is also turning 36 and receives personal information he’s hunted for his whole life.

As I said, they made us do the TV critics’ pinky-swear, so no more details. And while I’d like to see another few episodes to make sure, there’s something comfortably gooey right away about “This Is Us,” reminding us once more that amid all the high-functioning detectives, emergency-rescue personnel and secret-agent superheroes covered in cryptic tattoos, there are very few network dramas aimed at viewers who are simply interested in everyday people and how they feel. This is us, saying thanks for noticing.

Timeless

B+

Premiere date: Monday, Oct. 3

Time: 10 on NBC

This is a TV show in an admirably old-fashioned sense of the word, with a tight, action-packed pilot episode that is casually fun and intriguingly executed. There’s also a thought-provoking science-fiction premise that doesn’t clumsily reach for the profoundly metaphorical.

Abigail Spencer (“Rectify”) stars as Lucy Preston, a history professor summoned by the government to help out with a highly classified crisis: A determined criminal named Garcia Flynn (“ER’s” Goran Visnjic) has stolen our top-secret time machine and for some reason taken it to New Jersey in May 1937 — the time and place of the Hindenburg airship crash.

What, why? (How?) Never mind — off we go! Teamed up with a rakish ex-soldier (Matt Lanter as Wyatt Logan) and a geek scientist (Malcolm Barrett as Rufus Carlin), Lucy takes the lab’s spare time machine (the clunkier beta model) to 1937 to stop Flynn before he significantly alters history. Arriving there (or then) is a visual treat, with the kind of period details that only a network budget can buy, even though Rufus nervously points out that traveling to any point earlier than about 1980 sounds like a losing proposition to a black man like himself.

A coyly convoluted plot kicks in, as our gang tussles with bad guys aboard the Hindenburg. I won’t tell you if it still blows up or not, but I did like “Timeless’s” kicker, when Lucy returns to the present day to discover that even the slightest futzing with history has profound (and personal) paradoxical consequences, which set a tone for further travels with her team. (Amelia Earhart’s disappearance! Abe Lincoln’s assassination!) Along the way, I hope they land in an era when viewers were less overwhelmed with choices and a clever show like this stood a better chance.

American Housewife

B

Premiere date: Tuesday, Oct. 11

Time: 8:30 on ABC

Katy Mixon (“Mike & Molly”) makes easily enjoyable work out of creator Sarah Dunn’s comedy about a rebellious stay-at-home mom who resents her skinny peers in status-conscious Connecticut. The first episode spends an uncomfortable amount of time fixated on weight: Mixon, as a character named Katie Otto, is upset to learn that her neighbor across the way, known as “Fat Pam,” is moving, which will leave Katie with the distinction of being “the second fattest woman in Westport,” the one the yoga-toned moms all pay the same compliment: “You’re so real.”

Luckily, the shtick shifts. “American Housewife” is at its best during scenes of Katie’s daily life with her nerdy husband, Greg (Diedrich Bader), who happens to adore her plus-size figure, and her three children, who prove once more that ABC (with its Disneyfied intuition about such things) has a remarkable knack for casting snarky sitcom kids: a daughter, Taylor (Meg Donnelly), is on the verge of converting into a Stepford teen; a son, Oliver (Daniel DiMaggio), has political views that land to the right of Alex P. Keaton; and an adorable daughter, Anna Kat (Julia Butters), exhibits an obsessive-compulsive disorder of the delightful David Sedaris variety.

The show benefits from the current cultural backlash against flawless families and Pinterest perfection. There’s also a sharply written scene when Katie confronts the budding Ayn Rand fan in her midst, forcing Oliver to donate to food drives and help the homeless, even as he logically points out that being conservative is his true identity: “If I said I was a girl inside, you’d let me go to school in a dress!” Good point, but it nevertheless gives Katie sweet satisfaction to make him suffer.

Designated Survivor

B

Premiere date: Wednesday, Sept. 21

Time: 10 on ABC

This is the fall show everyone in Washington keeps asking about, with visions dancing in their heads of Jack Bauer kicking butt in the White House. One episode into “Designated Survivor” may not convince these “24” fans that their beloved Kiefer Sutherland is now a deskbound, rookie POTUS. But once you’re over that hump, the show certainly makes a compelling case for its premise.

Sutherland stars as Tom Kirkman, a smart but ineffectual HUD secretary who, on the morning of the president’s State of the Union address, is asked to tender his resignation, with one final indignity: He must watch the address from a bunker as the “designated survivor,” the Cabinet secretary who stays safely behind while everyone else attends the speech, just in case.

As viewers doubtless know by now, a massive explosion destroys the Capitol, and minutes later, Kirkman (still wearing his Cornell hoodie) is sworn in as president with his wife, Alex (“Californication’s” Natascha McElhone), at his side and a West Wing and Pentagon full of doubters. That includes Kal Penn as a dubious junior speechwriter who gets an hour to write Kirkman’s first and most important live address.

Sutherland clearly relishes the chance to play an urban-policy wonk who has to dig deep to find the courage to lead a nation in crisis. It would take another two episodes at least (not available for this review) to determine where creator David Guggenheim and his writers will take things from here: Is it a Sorkin-esque policy drama heavy on code-red threat levels? A family drama? (The Kirkmans, of course, come with a disobedient Trouble Teen.) An action thriller? All of the above? The dust may take time to settle, but dammit, Chloe, we don’t have much time!

The Exorcist

B

Premiere date: Friday, Sept. 23

Time: 9 on Fox

No one’s outdone William Friedkin’s 1973 masterful movie adaptation of William Peter Blatty’s novel about the pernicious demon who sent a man of the cloth tumbling down the Georgetown steps. Fox’s new series based on the movie isn’t intent on outdoing the classic so much as borrowing its frigid style, which it gets essentially correct in the first episode.

In the show, set in the bleakest, most dead-leaf-strewn portrayal of Chicago ever, Alfonso Herrera (“Sense8”) stars as Father Tomás What-a-Waste, the handsome pastor of a parish that’s losing congregants and crumbling apart. Geena Davis co-stars as Angela Rance, a wealthy CEO who attends the church with her two daughters (Brianne Howey and Hannah Kasulka) and a husband (Alan Ruck) who suffers from early-onset dementia. Angela is convinced a presence has moved into their home (no surprise that the devil still loves a multistory townhouse) and asks Father Tomás to check it out.

Certain visions and spooky feelings lead Tomás to Father Marcus Keane (“Flesh and Bone’s” Ben Daniels) at some kind of dormitory for wayward priests. Marcus, having suffered defeat during his last exorcism (cue the flashbacks and twisty-neck effects), brusquely declines and scoffs at the younger priest’s innocence, which of course means he’ll soon dust off his stole and bring the holy water to join Tomás. Can green vomit and levitation be far behind?

Perhaps not. The producers seem deadly serious about delivering something that both honors and deviates from the franchise; they say the show won’t necessarily become a procedural possession-o’-the-week series. Whatever’s going on in the Rance house is apparently a harbinger of a larger conflict between good and evil. The dogs howl; the crows gather. “The Exorcist” is back in business.

The Great Indoors

B

Premiere date: Thursday, Oct. 27

Time: 8:30 on CBS

The most intense generational tussle of our era is thought to exist between baby boomers and their millennial offspring, while the usually overlooked Generation X gets to enjoy the fray from the sidelines. But that’s not necessarily so, as this clever sitcom demonstrates. Joel McHale (“Community,” “The Soup”) is spot on as Jack, a seasoned travel/adventure journalist for Outdoor Limits magazine, who is called back to Chicago headquarters by his boss, Roland (Stephen Fry), who has decided to solve declining circulation woes by shuttering the print edition and focusing on the digital audience.

Jack’s long-form nonfiction days are behind him as he is put in charge of a hyperwired millennial staff of content providers (including “Superbad’s” Christopher Mintz-Plasse), who curate listicles and slide shows and interview one another for their daily podcasts. Digs at millennial stereotypes abound here (everyone gets a trophy; bursting into tears at the slightest hint of criticism; a comfort dog brought to the office every day). But a few zingers are hurled Jack’s way, too, making it clear that 45 is the new Methuselah. It all rings just true enough to be fairly funny; the pilot episode comes across as a way to poke harmless fun across the divide.

Or so I thought: At a press preview in August, the producers and writers of “The Great Indoors” came in for some sharp words from millennial TV critics, who didn’t appreciate the parts of the show that made fun of millennials for getting easily upset or offended. Yes, that’s right: They’re offended at the notion that they’re easily offended. Don’t you love it? I say the writers should double down and make these ninnies cry every week. It’s good medicine to learn how to be mocked.

Pitch

B

Premiere date: Thursday, Sept. 22

Time: 9 on Fox

Like a 90-minute inspirational sports movie squished down to a 43-minute TV pilot, “Pitch” is in a big hurry to run with our emotions and soar, opening its tale on the day that Ginny Baker (“Under the Dome’s” Kylie Bunbury) becomes the first female major league baseball player when she’s called up to pitch for the San Diego Padres. Executive producers Dan Fogelman and Rick Singer have done an admirable job of showing us what this moment in history would feel like; comparisons to Jackie Robinson abound as little girls flood the ballpark to cheer on their hero.

All eyes are on Ginny, especially the hot glare of the media. Though the Padres’ front-office is over the moon about ticket sales (Mark Consuelos plays the general manager, and Bob Balaban plays the billionaire owner), the clubhouse greets Ginny with predictably sexist scorn, perhaps best personified in the dismissiveness of Mike Lawson (Mark-Paul Gosselaar), the team’s catcher and longtime star, who senses a threat to his own celebrity status.

Adhering to the sports-story narrative, Ginny must suffer the lows before she experiences a high. When her first game is a disaster, the team manager (Dan Lauria) is ready to send her back down. Perseverance kicks in, as do flashbacks to the one man Ginny can never please — the father (Michael Beach) who has been riding her to do better since she was a child. All the tropes are present and accounted for, but they’re beautifully played out. In fact, “Pitch” tells its story in such a full way that it leaves only one obvious question unanswered: What could the second episode possibly be about?

Speechless

B

Premiere date: Wednesday, Sept. 21

Time: 8:30 on ABC

What a sweet thing “Speechless” is, a comedy starring Minnie Driver as Maya DiMeo, a mother of three who keeps moving her family around town until she finds a suitable school district that will meet the needs of her eldest son, JJ (Micah Fowler), who has cerebral palsy and communicates by moving his head to direct a light at a display board attached to his motorized wheelchair.

Yes, this is a show with Good Intentions and Something Important to Say about people who are different, which may well get in the way of its primary goal — to be very funny. But the writers and producers of “Speechless” wisely decided to give the DiMeo family an array of eccentricities and an honest policy of saying whatever is on their minds. Driver brings the right energy and sets the overall mood as a mother who won’t take no for an answer when it comes to JJ’s rights; John Ross Bowie, as her husband, Jimmy, offers a nice counterbalance as a casual, laid-back dad. The DiMeos’ two younger children, Ray (Mason Cook), who is tired of changing schools, and Dylan (Kyla Kennedy), an energetic daughter who longs to break records on the track team, remind their parents that they have their own needs.

A viewer can tell from the pilot episode that the cast and producers of “Speechless” are focused on getting this right; they don’t want to cut corners when it comes to JJ’s abilities, nor should they underestimate the ability of Fowler, who actually has cerebral palsy, to play the role with range and nuance. That all seems to take care of itself in the pilot; the trick now is to really take chances in further episodes with the sharper and potentially shocking comedy.

Frequency

B-

Premiere date: Wednesday, Oct. 5

Time: 9 on CW

This ghost-in-the-machine crime drama, inspired by the 2000 movie, is about a New York homicide detective, Raimy Sullivan (Peyton List), who starts hearing the voice of her father, Frank (Riley Smith), via his old ham radio in the garage. That’s a surprise, seeing as how Frank was murdered in October 1996 while working as an undercover cop. Raimy, who was 8 when her father died, is skeptical at first, but it eventually occurs to both of them that they are communicating across some sort of wrinkle in time.

Using their spooky link, Raimy tries to change her father’s fate, which we all know is a bad idea, especially those of us who watched the premiere of NBC’s “Timeless” a couple of weeks before “Frequency’s” premiere. (Tell us, readers of the near future: Has “Timeless” already been canceled? I hope not.) Long story short, it all becomes a big tangle of time spaghetti, unleashing a serial killer who had been dormant for two decades. I suppose Raimy Then and Raimy Now have a lot of work cut out for themselves, with the help of Dead Dad and Not-Dead Dad.

“Frequency’s” concept was mildly intriguing in theaters, and it’s mildly intriguing now, even with an extra layer or two of mushy TV-style goop on top of the story’s basic hokeyness. List and the other cast members give convincing enough performances, while creator Jeremy Carver (whose work includes writing for “Supernatural” and co-creating Syfy’s “Being Human”) is well attuned to the CW audience’s fondness for a perfectly average, cleanly comprehensible TV show. It’s no one’s idea of provocative television, but I’ll bet it quickly becomes someone’s favorite show.

Falling Water

C+

Premiere date: Thursday, Oct. 13

Time: 10 on USA

Something tells me that a Venn diagram of the people who like to talk about their dreams and the people who love a long, loopy, conspiratorial TV drama would make for a lot of common shade. USA’s “Falling Water” (alas, it’s not a Frank Lloyd Wright miniseries) is probably just the sort of thing for people who like a show that always (and stylishly) keeps them permanently perplexed. Not in the “Mr. Robot” way — more in the “Sense8” or “Heroes” way, in which a group of unrelated people eventually figure out their eerie common denominator, piecing together a larger narrative.

So it is that three New Yorkers (Lizzie Brochere, David Ajala and Will Yun Lee) are all having scraps of the same disturbing dreams, even though they seemingly have no connection — one is a highly sought fashion trendspotter; one is a homicide detective; one is the security expert at a Wall Street firm. Their dreams involve phantom birth, maternal detachment, runaway buses and the word “Topeka”; subliminal notions that may be rooted in shocking facts and could unlock some useful power. When it comes to dreams, don’t forget the long, dark hallway, which, in this show, tends to be even longer and darker.

To its credit, “Falling Water” is meticulously visualized, with a story that works extra hard to set a mood between lucid dreaming and wakefulness, and a script that is appropriately lean. The only thing that’s crystal clear is that this won’t be a short trip, so it’s up to a viewer to decide if the show is languorously absorbing or just painfully slow. Two episodes in, my vote goes to painfully slow, while certain others may be tantalized by “Falling Water’s” many secrets.

Graves

C+

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 16

Time: 10 on Epix

Held to the political comedy standards of, say, HBO’s brutally funny “Veep,” Epix’s new 10-episode dramedy “Graves” can’t stand up. But if we lower the bar a bit and think of some of those cutesy political fantasy movies of the 1990s (“Dave,” for example, and parts of “The American President”) that still strike a chord with viewers in a broadly populist sense . . . well then, this just might work.

Part of “Graves’s” problem is that it reads too bluntly as a lefty dream come true, in which a former two-term Republican president (Nick Nolte as Richard Graves) gets a wild hair (and reads a Slate article that calls him the worst president in history) and realizes that his staunchly conservative policies made life hell for ordinary Americans.

From his retirement ranch in Santa Fe, N.M., Graves sets off to make eccentric amends, much to the chagrin of his popular wife, Margaret (Sela Ward), who is considering a run for Senate, and the exasperation of his fawning assistant, Isaiah Miller (Skylar Astin). The former president goes on the cable news show of Laura Wolf (Nora Dunn), who’s made her career lambasting him, and apologizes for his anti-immigration tirades. At a charity speech to cancer survivors, he admits he cut funds that should have gone to research.

It’s an interesting spree — strewn with cameos from Jake Tapper, Rudy Giuliani, Bill Richardson and more — and Nolte seems to make more of the role than the scripts offer. But “Graves” is also somewhat leaden and obvious in its first two episodes, replete with a rebellious former first daughter (Helene Yorke) and a first son (Chris Lowell) who never felt loved. It’s another First Family comedy where the funny parts feel overexerted.

Lethal Weapon

C+

Premiere date: Wednesday, Sept. 21

Time: 8 on Fox

Another week, another retro reboot — this time of the Mel Gibson-Danny Glover movie franchise that began in 1987, about a wildly unconventional cop who is mismatched with a by-the-book partner. From there, a thousand cop-buddy movies would flow.

The basics in Fox’s new version are still intact, but series creator Matt Miller and his team also seem to see potential in adding to “Lethal Weapon’s” strings section, particularly when it comes to the heartache of the Gibson character, Martin Riggs (now played by “Rectify’s” Clayne Crawford), an ex-Navy SEAL and El Paso narcotics detective who is grieving the sudden death of his pregnant wife in a car accident. With nothing left to lose, Riggs moves to Los Angeles, where a connection gets him paired with career LAPD detective Roger Murtaugh (Damon Wayans), husband of a powerful defense attorney (Keesha Sharp) and father to three, including a baby daughter.

Riggs and Murtaugh meet at a hostage situation, where Murtaugh gets his first clue that his partner has a death wish. “Charlie’s Angels” rebooter McG directs the pilot and serves as an executive producer, which gives “Lethal Weapon” a colorful (if nonsensical) sense of stunt-centric razzmatazz and other violations of the laws of physics — at one point a car chase ends up in the middle of a downtown Grand Prix race. Ridiculous, yes, but it’s a show that is honest about itself, with a surprisingly endearing performance from Crawford. The question, of course, is: Did the world really need another “Lethal Weapon”? One was probably coming anyhow, either to the multiplex or a network lineup, whether audiences wanted it or not. I promise you, we could have done a lot worse.

MacGyver

C+

Premiere date: Friday, Sept. 23

Time: 8 on CBS

Yes, it’s that “MacGyver,” reimagined here as a millennial version of Angus “Mac” MacGyver (Lucas Till of the recent “X-Men” movies), an MIT grad who defused bombs during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and now works for the clandestine “Department of External Services” for the U.S. government. He and his team (George Eads, Tristin Mays) are assigned to do whatever it takes to save the world, over and over.

In typical “MacGyver” fashion, producers waited until the last minute to share the first episode with critics — and it’s a doozy, complete with MacGyver’s cheesy new Hillary Clinton hairstyle (the original MacGyver’s ’80s mullet would have been preferable) and remedial voice-over narration as he puts the full range of his resourcefully improvisational hacking skills to the test, preventing terrorists (one of them his ex-girlfriend) from deploying a stolen bioweapon. After motorboat chases, shootouts and a moment where MacGyver clings to the landing gear on a private jet, it all naturally comes down to a few remaining seconds on a timer wired to a bomb. MacGyver, as we all know, does his best work at 00:00:05 or less.

Some of us won’t be able to watch “MacGyver” without feeling like we’re getting a lobotomy with an unwound paper clip; others will be delighted by this energetic, easygoing update. It’s scheduled to air before the season premiere of “Hawaii Five-O,” a reboot that was also initially greeted with scoffs and is now going on seven years. So you might want to get used to this new Mac.

The Good Place

C

Premiere date: Monday, Sept. 19

Time: 10 on NBC

Michael Schur’s credits as a producer, writer and co-creator include “The Office,” “Brooklyn Nine-Nine” and “Parks and Recreation.” Not bad. His latest creation, however, an afterlife comedy called “The Good Place,” needs some work — at least judging from the first few episodes.

Kristen Bell (“House of Lies,” “Veronica Mars”) stars as a coldhearted snake named Eleanor Shellstrop, who dies suddenly and finds herself transported to the Good Place, a euphemistic term for a heaven-like arrangement, fastidiously overseen by Michael (Ted Danson), the cheerful architect of the cookie-cutter Pleasantville where Eleanor has been assigned. What’s more, she gets to spend eternity with her actual soul mate, Chidi (William Jackson Harper), and bask in the eternal sunshine earned by those who lived virtuous lives. Clearly a mistake has been made, and Eleanor needs to straighten up her act (and her attitude) before Michael finds out and sends her to the Bad Place.

If there’s a purgatory for mediocre comedies that are built on wobbly premises, then that’s where this should go. A viewer will spend too much time grappling with the show’s intent (what might it be saying about the various ideas and beliefs people have about the afterlife?) and not enough time laughing. I’ll save you some time: There is no message and very few laughs, either. Bell’s character immediately comes off as a grating presence, and Danson seems miscast as the easily flustered angelic goody-goody. Still, Schur and company may turn this dud into a rainbow. Remember that hardly anyone thought “Parks and Rec” would rise to greatness after its first episode; a little faith may eventually bring reward. (Moves to Thursdays at 8:30 on Sept. 22.)

Conviction

C-

Premiere date: Monday, Oct. 3

Time: 10 on ABC

Hayley Atwell (“Marvel’s Agent Carter”) stars in this formulaic legal drama as Hayes Morrison, a talented lawyer who did time in the White House as the first daughter. Tabloid attention still hounds her as she lives up to (or down to, as the case may be) her party-girl image. In the pilot episode, she starts her morning in a Manhattan jail cell on a cocaine possession charge and ends it with a new job, courtesy of New York’s politically ambitious D.A., Conner Wallace (Eddie Cahill), who offers her a deal: Take over as head of his wrongful-convictions division or face the drug charges.

Unable to refuse, Hayes takes the job. Bossing around a deeply resentful staff of underlings, she digs in on cases where the person who went to jail may be innocent. “This isn’t about justice,” Hayes replies when the D.A. touts the nobility of the task. “This is about selling yourself as caring, passionate, electable.” (She forgot Google-able, so let me save you the trouble: Cahill had a recurring role on “Friends” — yes, omg, it’s Tag!)

The premise might work better in the hands of writers determined to weave together procedural crime stories and high-powered characters with a light, intelligent touch, “Good Wife”-style, gracefully volleying between court cases and political maneuverings. “Conviction,” co-created by Liz Friedman and Liz Friedlander, prefers the blunt approach, in strict accordance with ABC’s predictably melodramatic house style for one-hour dramas. The edits from scene to scene can feel more like amputations than quick cuts.

“Conviction” also assumes that viewers are ready to break our own personal land-speed records for following along with a new show; we might as well be watching it on fast-forward. Why the sprint? The only thing waiting at the finish line for a show this average is cancellation.

No Tomorrow

C-

Premiere date: Tuesday, Oct. 4

Time: 9 on CW

This unspeakably cutesy romantic drama (based on a Brazilian series from 2012) is about a woman named Evie (Tori Anderson) who has a boring job and a boring boyfriend and a boring family who nags her for not being married yet. She has a chance run-in with an angelically attractive neighborhood hipster, Xavier (“Galavant’s” Joshua Sasse), who tells her he’s calculated that an asteroid the size of Mount Everest will collide with Earth in eight months and 12 days. Unable to convince the world of his discovery, Xavier is dedicated to spending his remaining days crossing items off his YOLO list, and that most certainly does not include working. Evie can’t help but be tempted to quit her own job and join him.

Not to sound like the world’s biggest fuddy-duddy, but the first episode of “No Tomorrow” plays too easily as millennial claptrap. It can sometimes seem as if they all want to quit their jobs and climb Machu Picchu (Xavier has already crossed that off his list). They’re too good for everyday existence — and they’ve got the Instagram pictures to prove it. While Evie succumbs to Xavier’s charms and leaps into dune buggies and up on stage to karaoke some Whitesnake, a less impressionable viewer begins to wonder why Xavier gave up so quickly on trying to alert the world of its doom. Is he a fraud? (I don’t trust him — he wears too many turquoise rings, for starters.) Is he wrong about the asteroid? Is he even real?

Now there’s a thought: There would be more to love about “No Tomorrow” if we slowly got the idea that Evie is imagining this whole thing from a place of heavy medication, in a padded room somewhere.

Bull

D+

Premiere date: Tuesday, Sept. 20

Time: 9 on CBS

This drama is based on the applied uses of courtroom psychology, in which high-dollar experts and consultants advise attorneys (defense attorneys, mostly) on how to select and manipulate juries. That doesn’t necessarily mean “Bull” is to be believed — a lot of it is a crock, in just the way audiences have come to expect from a CBS procedural.

Michael Weatherly, seeking refuge from 13 seasons on “NCIS,” is weirdly miscast here as the confident Dr. Jason Bull, a psychologist who gets remarkable results. Sporting chunky horn-rimmed glasses and delivering most of his lines in a low monotone as if he’s been cast as a suave Batman, Weatherly lacks just the sort of animal magnetism he’s been told to project. Or maybe it’s the deeply cynical, unctuous nature of the work his character does: “ ‘Innocent until proven guilty’ is ‘Two all-beef patties, special sauce, lettuce, cheese, pickles, onions on a sesame-seed bun,’ ” Bull tells the attorney of a rich-kid murder defendant in the pilot episode. “It’s the old jingle.”

Whatever. There’s probably an interesting show to be made about this line of work, but “Bull” quickly lapses into the standard prime-time bull. And talk about an old jingle: Whether a CBS drama grants special talents to a detective or a computer hacker, you can be sure that character will be briefly, ritually flustered or surprised (usually at the 31-minute mark) but never outwitted or emotionally stricken or . . . well, fill in any sort of pain or reckoning that would carry over to the next episode.

“Bull” is ostensibly based on the early work of Dr. Phil McGraw, the syndicated daytime talk-show host, who used to help attorneys read juries and serves as an adviser to this show. No wonder it’s got a whiff of malarkey.

Kevin Can Wait

D

Premiere date: Monday, Sept. 19

Time: 8:30 on CBS

“Kevin Can Wait” kicks off the official first week of the fall TV season and simultaneously takes the biggest possible step backward, looking like a sitcom that belongs in the fall 1997 lineup. Its star, Kevin James, is sitcom royalty at CBS, after nine hit seasons of “The King of Queens,” so naturally the network is thrilled to have him back. It really doesn’t matter what sort of sitcom this is, so long as it’s the CBS-iest sitcom possible.

This time James plays newly retired police officer Kevin Gable, looking forward to spending more time with his wife, Donna (Erinn Hayes), kids and his other retired-cop buddies. Kevin is thrown a curve (if you could call it that) when the garage apartment he was hoping to earn extra income on will instead be occupied, rent-free, by his 20-year-old daughter, Kendra (Taylor Spreitler), and her surprise fiance, an app-designing techie named Chale (Ryan Cartwright). That means Kevin is now hunting for a new job. If it was another kind of show, I’d be eager to hear Kevin kvetch, Archie Bunker-style, about the Black Lives Matter movement and other police-related topics; based on the pilot shown to critics this summer, that doesn’t seem to be in store.

I’m not opposed to “Kevin Can Wait” on any particular principle (not even the pernicious fat husband/petite wife trope that used to get other critics so worked up), nor am I immune to James’s appeal. But I am let down that CBS reserves so much of its schedule for serving rice pudding laced with a sedative. Rise up, citizens of nursing homes and waiting rooms! Rise up and demand funnier shows! Or rise up and at least change the channel.

Son of Zorn

D

Premiere date: Sunday, Sept. 11

Time: 8 on Fox

This excruciatingly one-note animation/live-action hybrid comedy is filled with jokes that seem more automated than written, at least in the pilot episode. Jason Sudeikis turns in a bare-minimum performance as the voice of Zorn, an 8-foot-tall ’80s cartoon warrior from the island of Zephyria, who catches a plane to the human world of Orange County, Calif., in an attempt to reconnect with his 17-year-old son, Alangulon (Johnny Pemberton), a nerdy high school senior who prefers to be called Alan.

Cheryl Hines co-stars as Zorn’s ex-wife, Edie, who has put her barbarian days way behind her. “Did you get bangs?” she asks Zorn when he rings her doorbell.

“Remember the time we had that fivesome with the mountain trolls?” Zorn asks her, perhaps hoping to rekindle a spark.

“That was the old me,” she sighs, and introduces him to her fiance, Craig (Tim Meadows), but Zorn still thinks he has a chance to woo her. (“Don’t act like you’ve never ridden a death hawk, Edie,” Zorn reminds her. “I was 19,” she replies. “I was coked out of my mind.”) The rapport is sometimes witty (the laughs are merely smirks), and the mixing of animation and live-action surprisingly hasn’t come all that far since the Roger Rabbit days. The humans involved still look like they’re trying to figure out the dynamics of acting with a co-star who isn’t really there.

Zorn decides to stay (for as long as Fox will air him, I suppose), finding an apartment and getting a cubicle job where, he says, his superior (Artemis Pebdani) “dresses exactly like a woman.” That’s because she is a woman. It’s just one more way “Son of Zorn” ceaselessly hammers home its protagonist’s vain disregard for our eco-conscious, tech-driven, diverse culture. It gets old the minute it starts.

Berlin Station

D-

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 16

Time: 9 on Epix

With plenty of “Homeland” envy and almost none of its momentum or appeal, this 10-episode attempt by cable movie channel Epix to get back into the original drama game is an espionage thriller that immediately runs long on trench coats and short on thrills. It’s about a CIA agent, Daniel Miller (Richard Armitage), who accepts a clandestine assignment from his superiors: Take a job in the Berlin office to see if an inside source is responsible for leaking classified secrets via an online whistleblower who goes by the name “Thomas Shaw.”

There’s a fine line between telling your viewers too much and respecting their intelligence enough to figure it out. This is a show that wants to be complex but winds up being convoluted instead. There are moments in the first two episodes where even the dutiful cast members (including “True Blood’s” Michelle Forbes and “Olive Kitteridge’s” Richard Jenkins) read their lines professionally but have a look on their faces like they don’t understand what the hell any of it means. (Many of the plot threads resemble “Homeland’s” season in Berlin last year, a fact that doesn’t seem like plagiarism so much as lack of imagination.)

One of the reasons it’s difficult to keep up is that “Berlin Station” is boring, as is its central character. As the spy we’re supposed to be rooting for, Armitage might as well be a cardboard cutout. If you want cable viewers to find you on a busy Sunday night and stick with you, you’re going to have to do better than this.

Notorious

F

Premiere date: Thursday, Sept. 22

Time: 9 on ABC

Honestly, instead of watching this, why not just remove your brain, put it in a jar and admire it from the couch? That’s one way of trying to dissuade you from watching this ill-spirited and possibly corrosive drama — but of course now I’ve piqued your interest, haven’t I?

Ostensibly based on the real-life back-scratching between high-profile L.A. lawyer Mark Geragos and longtime “Larry King Live” executive producer Wendy Walker, “Notorious” skids right off the cliff with the concept. Here, lawyer Jake Gregorian (Daniel Sunjata) and Julia George (Piper Perabo), the producer of a news show called “Louise Herrick Live,” manipulate and exploit the travails of his celebrity clients for mutual benefit: She gets big exclusives and ratings, and he gets to plant reasonable doubts and perform damage control on behalf of his clients. Between them they’ve got zero ethics (legal or journalistic); the show quite happily pretends such principles never existed. It’s depressing to think about how many viewers will agree.

It’s amazing how many different scenes creators/writers Josh Berman and Allie Hagan packed into the pilot episode — with Julia having a fling with a federal judge and Jake rushing around to defend a high-tech billionaire accused of killing a teenager in a hit-and-run, while also advising a city councilman on how to contain old fraternity photos that feature a Confederate flag — and still found time for all the humpin’ around and other setups and subplots.

It’s an exhausting hour, and if it was a plate-spinning act, I’d give it a rave. But it’s a prime-time drama that leans too heavily on flash and trash without having the common decency to be ironic. Just a wink from the actors to let us know that they realize it’s junk — it’s all I ask.

Good Girls Revolt

B+

Premiere date: Friday, Oct. 28

Time: on Amazon streaming

Updated Oct. 27: The pilot episode, which Amazon shared with all of its Prime subscribers some months ago, had moments that verged on feminist ham. But now that I’ve seen five more episodes, I’m quite taken with this drama about a gender showdown at a Newsweek-like magazine in 1970. Click here to read my full review.

Man With a Plan

F

Premiere date: Monday, Oct. 24

Time: 8:30 on CBS

Updated Oct. 25: If you accidentally find yourself watching “Man With a Plan,” which stars Matt LeBlanc (forever Joey) as Adam, a contractor who takes on added parenting and household duties when his wife returns to work, I would recommend supplying your own layer of alternate reality: Imagine that this particleboard sitcom is in fact part of a lost season of Showtime’s “Episodes,” in which “Matt LeBlanc” (played by LeBlanc, in a nicely meta turn) winds up landing yet another sitcom that exists mainly to employ actors, writers and producers — and thus consciously squanders all the critical goodwill he gained by playing a version of himself on an ironic premium cable comedy.

Further episodes might get funnier, but from all appearances, “Man With a Plan” is one of those shows that, when you reach to shut it off, the person on the other side of the hospital curtain divider will feebly groan, “Hey, I was watching that.”

Pure Genius

D+

Premiere date: Thursday, Oct. 27

Time: 10 on CBS

Updated Oct. 25: A rare and probably untreatable case of a premise that comes off far more creepy than it intends, “Pure Genius” (created by “Parenthood’s” Jason Katims) is about a Bay Area research hospital built by a wealthy tech titan, James Bell (Augustus Prew), to eliminate the red tape that stands between traditional medicine and cutting-edge techniques. At Bunker Hill, terminally ill patients are admitted free and treatments are experimental.

A newly hired surgeon, Walter Wallace (Dermot Mulroney), is a little skeeved out by Bell’s renegade approach, where patients are promised miracles and the staff relies heavily on TV’s infamous “whatever technology” — the floor-to-ceiling transparent touch screens and other gizmos that seem about 20 years ahead of their time and run on the same never-crashing OS seen in iterations of “CSI” and “24.” It doesn’t take long for Dr. Wallace to investigate the source of Bell’s exuberant involvement in the daily caseload: the billionaire’s secret hope that his top-notch recruits will find a cure for his own rare condition, which will rob him of all motor skills if untreated.

”Pure Genius” contains a message that still needs to be smoothed out. (One is reminded of stories of how Steve Jobs shunned traditional medicine as cancer consumed him.) “Pure Genius” hints at the conflict between Silicon Valley triumphalism and medical ethics, full of promises that can’t be kept (in one scene a mother communicates with a daughter in a vegetative coma using nifty new telepathy helmets), but stopping just short of sinister. It would have been more interesting if Dr. Wallace discovered he was being kept in the hospital beyond his will. Alas, “Pure Genius” is a show that means to inspire, not frighten.

Westworld

C+

Premiere date: Sunday, Oct. 2

Time: 9 on HBO

Condensed from Hank Stuever’s review published Sept. 29:

HBO's “Westworld” is the fall season’s big head-scratcher, dogged by production delays and reshoots. It’s deep and brooding, but it’s the wrong kind of deep and it’s a style of brooding that’s already been brooded a thousand times, especially in the sci-fi genre. Visually, “Westworld” (based on Michael Crichton’s 1973 movie) is a gorgeous and occasionally captivating treat, yet it’s wrapped up in a story that is astringent and sterile. Its creators, Jonathan Newton and Lisa Joy, have touted "Westworld's" philosophical bent as a selling point — exploring, per Joy's description of the show, "what it means to be human, from the outside in. . . . It’s a meditation on consciousness — the blessing and the burden of it."

In other words, class, “Westworld” is a big, fat homework assignment. The only fun here, if you can call it that, might be watching HBO burn some serious moola. Set in some distant future, the show is about a vacation resort in the American boonies, where guests arrive by bullet train and pay (according to one customer) $40,000 a day to ride a locomotive into the desert West of the 1880s. In the ersatz frontier town of Sweetwater, a citizenry of lifelike cyborgs — known to their makers as "hosts" — provide a Sensurround John Wayne experience, following a nearly limitless array of preprogrammed story lines and dialogue that includes all manner of frontier criminality and sin.

Evan Rachel Wood stars as Dolores, the oldest working robot on the premises, who begins to show signs of recognition that her perception of reality doesn’t add up. That's really what “Westworld” seems to be plodding toward: some larger message that things are never what they seem, particularly where technology is involved.

What else is on

Looks interesting

“Abandoned”

Fridays

9 on Viceland

Skateboarder Rick McCrank explores empty malls, schools, racetracks and even an entire abandoned town in this traveling docuseries.

“Loosely, Exactly Nicole”

Mondays

10:30 on MTV

Comedian Nicole Byer (“Girl Code”) stars in this dramedy about a young woman who moves to West Hollywood.

“Mary + Jane”

Mondays

10 on MTV

Comedy about two best friends who look for ways to improve their weed-delivery business in Los Angeles.

“Atlanta”

Tuesdays

10 on FX

Donald Glover created and stars in this flawlessly detailed dramedy about a man trying to get by in an impoverished Atlanta suburb, where he offers to manage his cousin’s fledgling rap career.

“Queen Sugar”

Tuesdays

10 on OWN

Drama series from producer/director Ava DuVernay, Oprah Winfrey and Melissa Carter about estranged siblings who inherit their family’s Louisiana sugar cane farm. In her review, The Post’s Bethonie Butler called the show “a rich and powerful portrait of a black American family.”

“StartUp”

on Crackle streaming

Ten-episode drama about three Miami tech entrepreneurs who create a controversial digital currency — and a crooked FBI agent (“Sherlock’s” Martin Freeman) who is intent on taking them down.

“A Season With Florida State Football”

Tuesdays

10 on Showtime

Weekly docuseries chronicles the team’s season.

“Better Things”

Thursdays

10 on FX

“Louie” writer and co-star Pamela Adlon’s well-written series about a single L.A. mother of three daughters and the awkward situations she endures, particularly as an aging actress in Hollywood.

“One Mississippi”

on Amazon streaming

Tig Notaro’s dry wit and personal experiences make for a little too dry dramedy about a breast-cancer survivor who returns to her coastal Mississippi home town after her mother’s sudden death.

“The Contenders: 16 for ’16”

Tuesdays

check local listings on PBS

Eight-episode documentary looks at past presidential bids over the past 50 years, including campaigns of Howard Dean, Shirley Chisholm, Mitt Romney, Michael Dukakis, Jesse Jackson, John McCain, Pat Buchanan, Ross Perot and so on.

“Taking Fire”

Tuesdays

10 on Discovery

Five-part docuseries recounts, in soldiers’ own words and helmet footage, deployment and combat in a Taliban-held valley in northeast Afghanistan.

“Legends of Chamberlain Heights”

Wednesdays

10:30 on Comedy Central

Animated comedy about three high school freshmen — Grover, Milk and Jamal — who dream of basketball superstardom even though they’re stuck benchwarming.

“68th Primetime Emmy Awards”

Sunday, Sept. 18

8 on ABC

Jimmy Kimmel hosts the increasingly competitive awards show. Looks good for FX’s “The People v. O.J. Simpson,” but will “The Americans” also at last get some love?

“The Case Of: JonBenet Ramsey”

Sunday, Sept. 18

8:30 on CBS

Two-part docuseries re-examines the shocking (and still unsolved) murder of the child beauty-pageant competitor who was found dead in her family’s Boulder, Colo., home the day after Christmas 1996. Part 2 airs Sept. 19 at 9 p.m. (You’re not seeing things — this is the third JonBenet-related program to air this month.)

“WWII’s Most Daring Raids”

Sunday, Sept. 18

9 on Smithsonian Channel

Six-part docuseries looks back at some of World War II’s most dangerous commando raids, using first-person testimony, historical expertise and video-game-style graphics.

“Three Days of Terror: The Charlie Hebdo Attacks”

Monday, Sept. 19

8 on HBO

Documentary recounts the horrifying ISIS attacks in January 2015 that began at the editorial offices of the satirical Paris-based newspaper Charlie Hebdo and continued as police hunted the assailants.

“Capital”

Monday, Sept. 19

on Acorn TV streaming

From the makers of “Broadchurch” and “Humans,” a British drama about the lives of neighbors who each begin to receive menacing postcards.

“Defying the Nazis: The Sharps’ War”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

9, check local listings on PBS

Documentary from Ken Burns and Artemis Joukowsky III about a couple who rescued children during World War II.

“Strut”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

9 on Oxygen

Reality series produced by Whoopi Goldberg about transgender models.

“Easy”

Thursday, Sept. 22

on Netflix streaming

Eight-episode anthology series about an array of Chicago residents and their daily lives. Cast includes Hannibal Buress, Orlando Bloom, Malin Akerman, Marc Maron, Gugu Mbatha-Raw, Aya Cash, Dave Franco and more.

“Debate Wars”

Thursday, Sept. 22

on Seeso streaming

Michael Ian Black hosts a competition that pits comedians/improvisers against each other to debate some pressing issues.

“Audrie & Daisy”

Friday, Sept. 23

on Netflix streaming

Documentary examines the ripple effects on schools and communities when a sex crime is caught on camera in a world of social-media bullies and other modern forms of shame.

“Iliza Shlesinger: Confirmed Kills”

Friday, Sept. 23

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up special from a comedian who sees endless absurdity in modern gender roles and mating rituals.

“Van Helsing”

Friday, Sept. 23

on Syfy

Horror-action drama set in the near future about vampire hunter Vanessa Helsing (Kelly Overton), who has the unique genetic ability to turn vampires back into humans. Acclaimed playwright Neil LaBute serves as showrunner.

“Gringo: The Dangerous Life of John McAfee”

Saturday, Sept. 24

9 on Showtime

Documentary about tech entrepreneur John McAfee, who developed a successful compter-security software company and later started living a quasi-gangster lifestyle in Central America.

“Agatha Christie’s ‘And Then There Were None’”

Monday, Sept. 26

on Acorn TV streaming

Three-episode adaptation of the beloved novel about a dinner party on an island at which the guests begin disappearing.

“Frontline: The Choice 2016”

Tuesday, Sept. 27

9, check local listings on PBS

The venerable news-documentary series turns its attention to the causes and symptoms of this most unusual election year.

“Channel Zero”

Tuesday, Sept. 27

9 on Syfy

Horror anthology series based on stories that are published and passed around online (a.k.a. “creepypasta”). This tale is about a man’s obsession with a kiddie TV show in the 1980s and the frightening influence it may have had on him.

“Aftermath”

Tuesday, Sept. 27

10 on Syfy

Drama starring Anne Heche follows a family through a series of post-apocalyptic events that wipe out most of the planet.

“Big Brother: Over the Top”

Wednesday, Sept. 28

10 on CBS All Access

As part of its streaming subscriber service, All Access, CBS launches this new, more interactive version of “Big Brother” with 10 new houseguests.

“Crisis in Six Scenes”

Friday, Sept. 30

on Amazon streaming

Woody Allen tries his hand at a miniseries, about a suburban family in the 1960s. In addition to Allen, the cast includes Miley Cyrus, Elaine May, Lewis Black, Joy Behar and Becky Ann Baker.

“Marvel’s Luke Cage”

Friday, Sept. 30

on Netflix streaming

Another piece of Netflix and Marvel’s master plan to build out the Defenders team (along with Daredevil, Jessica Jones and Iron Fist), this 13-episode season tells the story of Luke Cage (Mike Colter), a man who is trying to rebuild his life in Harlem after a failed experiment left him with superhuman strength and impenetrable skin.

“Amanda Knox”

Friday, Sept. 30

on Netflix streaming

Documentary about the closely watched trial of an American college student who was accused of murdering her roommate in Italy.

“America Divided”

Friday, Sept. 30

9 on Epix

Five-part docuseries produced by Norman Lear, Shonda Rhimes and Common looks at inequality across the country in housing, education, health care, labor, criminal justice and the political system.

“29th Annual Hispanic Heritage Awards”

Friday, Sept. 30

10, check local listings on PBS

Telecast of awards show scheduled to be held Sept. 22 at Washington’s Warner Theatre. Honorees include Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor; author Junot Diaz; actress/singer Angelica Maria; and Latin music star J Balvin.

“Versailles”

Saturday, Oct. 1

10 on Ovation

George Blagden (dear, departed Athelstan from History’s “Vikings”) stars as King Louis XIV in this rich, 10-episode treat for Francophiles. It opens in 1667, when Louis, facing betrayal and danger, decides to relocate his court to a luxe hunting lodge outside Paris — the future palace of Versailles.

“Regina Spektor: A Soundstage Special”

Sunday, Oct. 2

11 on WETA

The singer-songwriter, whose music shows up in a lot of prestige television shows (including the “Orange Is the New Black” theme), performs in Chicago.

“Class Divide”

Monday, Oct. 3

8 on HBO

Documentary zeros in on gentrification and inequality in New York on a West Chelsea neighborhood block where a private school sits across from low-income public housing.

“Independent Lens: Best of Enemies”

Monday, Oct. 3

9, check local listings on PBS

Documentary revisits the legendary televised 1968 debate over politics and the election between two leading public intellectuals who were also bitter rivals: William F. Buckley Jr. and Gore Vidal.

“Yours, Mine or Ours”

Monday, Oct. 3

10 on Bravo

Reality series features L.A. real-estate expert Reza Farahan (“Shahs of Sunset”) and interior designer Taylor Spellman counseling couples who are about to move in together and don’t know whose house and furnishings to keep.

“Hotel Impossible: 5-Star Secrets”

Monday, Oct. 3

11 on Travel

Reality/travelogue series visits famous five-star properties and looks at the details that make them so exceptional.

“Total Bellas”

Wednesday, Oct. 5

8 on E!

Reality series about the WWE’s twin sister sensations, Nikki and Brie Bella.

“Catching Kelce”

Wednesday, Oct. 5

9 on E!

Icky but irresistible reality series in which Travis Kelce, the dashing tight end for the Kansas City Chiefs, romances 50 eligible women (yes, FIFTY, but he quickly eliminates 30 of them) in hopes finding one who suits him. There’s a pretty rich moment in the first episode when he accuses one of the women of being too focused on her “brand.” (She forgot his is the only brand that matters here.)

“Clash of the Corps”

Wednesday, Oct. 5

11 on Fuse

Eight-part docuseries goes behind the scenes of Drum Corps International and the heated competitions on the junior drum corps scene.

“I Heart Radio Music Festival”

Wednesday, Oct. 6

8 on CW

Part one of a scheduled Sept. 23-24 concert in Las Vegas, featuring U2, Drake, Sia, Twenty One Pilots and more. Continues Friday night with Sting, Usher, Ariana Grande, Florida Georgia Line, Tears for Fears and more.

“The 13th”

Friday, Oct. 7

on Netflix streaming

Documentary from Ava DuVernay (also opening in select theaters today) focuses on the 13th Amendment, which abolished slavery and involuntary servitude except as a punishment for a crime and contrasts that with the mass incarceration of black Americans in the present day and an ever-growing prison industry.

“The Swap”

Friday, Oct. 7

8 on Disney

A teenage girl and boy who are friends (Peyton List and Jacob Bertrand) find that they’ve switched bodies, “Freaky Friday”-style, after mutually kvetching about how the opposite gender has it easier.

“Dream On”

Friday, Oct. 7

check local listings on PBS

Documentary from comedian/commentator John Fugelsang sets out to examine the history and present-day status of the American Dream.

“My Life Is a Telenovela”

Friday, Oct. 7

10 on We TV

Reality series follows a group of Miami actors and actresses who work in the demanding and competitive world of telenovelas.

“Autumn in the Vineyard”

Saturday, Oct. 8

9 on Hallmark

Movie about a man and a woman who each have a legal claim to a vineyard and attempt to split it down the middle — when really the answer to their dilemma lies in romance. (Duh.)

“Freakish”

Monday, Oct. 10

on Hulu streaming

Teen drama about a bunch of high school students serving Saturday detention who are trapped at school when a fire at a nearby chemical plant becomes deadly — and changes the town in frightening ways.

“Vice News Tonight”

Monday, Oct. 10

7:30 on HBO

A new half-hour nightly newscast, only this time done the Vice way.

“Ben & Lauren: Happily Ever After?”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

8 on Freeform

Reality series further plumbs the post-“Bachelor” life and relationship of Ben Higgins and Lauren Bushnell.

“The Letter”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

9 on Freeform

Reality series encourages participants to anonymously tell their best friend, in a letter, all the things she or he really needs to hear.

“The Gary Owen Show”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

9:30 on BET

Reality series about a comedian dubbed “America’s honorary black comedian.” (He’s white.)

“Money, Power, Respect”

Thursday, Oct. 13

on We TV, check listings

Another reality series about the “glamorous yet cutthroat” business of making hip hop music.

“Haters Back Off”

Friday, Oct. 14

on Netflix streaming

Dramedy by and starring Colleen Ballinger-Evans as Miranda Sings, an untalented pop star whose baffling rise originates with her belief that she was born to be famous and it’s up to the rest of the world to realize it. Co-stars “The Office’s” Angela Kinsey as Miranda’s mom.

“Goliath”

Friday, Oct. 14

on Amazon streaming

Drama from “Boston Legal” creator David E. Kelley about a washed-up lawyer (Billy Bob Thornton) who tries to come back from the bottom. Co-stars William Hurt and Maria Bello.

“Wolf Creek”

Friday, Oct. 14

10 on Pop

Six-episode horror series based on a hit Australian film about a 19-year-old American tourist who finds herself targeted by a serial killer. After she survives his attack, she decides to get revenge.

“Southwest of Salem: The Story of the San Antonio Four”

Saturday, Oct. 15

8 on Investigation Discovery

Documentary re-examines the 1994 conviction of four women for sexually assaulting two girls. Twenty years later, the women say they were falsely accused in a wave of homophobia and rumors of witchcraft.

“Pumpkin Pie Wars”

Saturday, Oct. 15

9 on Hallmark

Movie that’s probably not as violent as it sounds, given that it’s Hallmark. Actually it’s about rival bakery owners who’ve competed in the county’s pumpkin-pie contest for years. Now their adult children are falling in love.

“Masterpiece: The Durrels in Corfu”

Sunday, Oct. 16

8, check local listings on PBS

Drama series (six parts) based on Gerald Durrell’s “My Family and Other Animals.”

“Killing Reagan”

Sunday, Oct. 16

8 on National Geographic Channel

Another dramatization of one of Bill O’Reilly’s assassination books, this time about the 1981 attempt on President Reagan’s life by John Hinckley Jr. Tim Matheson stars as Ronald Reagan; Cynthia Nixon co-stars as Nancy Reagan.

“Eyewitness”

Sunday, Oct. 16

10 on USA

Ten-episode drama about a violent crime as seen from the perspective of those who witnessed it. Based on the Scandinavian series “Øyevitne.”

“Chance”

Wednesday, Oct. 19

on Hulu streaming

“House M.D.” star Hugh Laurie’s new drama, a 10-episode series based on Kem Nunn’s novel about a San Francisco neuropsychiatrist, Dr. Eldon Chance (Laurie), who finds himself in a violent and dangerous (and mentally unbalanced) world.

“CMT Artists of the Year”

Wednesday, Oct. 19

8 on CMT

How on Earth do country music stars find time to attend all these awards shows?

“The Rocky Horror Picture Show: Let’s Do the Time Warp Again”

Thursday, Oct. 20

8 on Fox

Laverne Cox (“Orange Is the New Black”) stars as Dr. Frank-N-Furter in this exuberantly faithful remake of the campy 1975 movie musical about a young couple who are stranded on the road and wind up meeting a bizarre array of sexually ambiguous alien visitors and their debaucherous friends. Tim Curry, who played Frank-N-Furter in the original, returns as the Narrator.

“Great Performances: Hamilton’s America”

Friday, Oct. 21

9, check local listings on PBS

Documentary follows the creation of the mega-smash Broadway musical that you’d still like to see someday.

“One & Done”

Friday, Oct. 21

9 on Showtime

Documentary about basketball prodigy Ben Simmons, who was drafted this year by the Philadelphia 76ers.

“Joe Rogan: Triggered”

Friday, Oct. 21

on Netflix streaming

Another stand-up comedy from the guy who used to get people to eat bugs.

“Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency”

Saturday, Oct. 22

9 on BBC America

Drama series adapted from Douglas Adams’s novels, in which a murder case pairs a loner (Elijah Wood) with an unconventionally absurd detective (Samuel Barnett) who believes they are cosmically destined to solve cases together.

“Weiner”

Saturday, Oct. 22

9 on Showtime

Television premiere of the acclaimed documentary about the former congressman with the sexting problem and his attempt to run for mayor of New York a few years ago. “Engrossing, almost shamefully entertaining,” Post film critic Ann Hornaday wrote earlier this year.

“Jean of the Joneses”

Sunday, Oct. 23

7 on TV One

Original movie about a young woman who grew up in a multigenerational family of strong-minded women who’ve kept some secrets that are revealed after a tragedy.

“The Hate Card: Jorge Ramos Reporting”

Monday, Oct. 24

9 on HBO

Documentary from Mexican-born journalist Jorge Ramos, who examines what it means to be an American, particularly in light of how he was treated while covering the Donald Trump campaign.

“American Masters: Norman Lear — Just Another Version of You”

Tuesday, Oct. 25

9, check local listings on PBS

Documentary portrait of the legendary TV writer and producer. In her review of the film during its July theatrical release, Post critic Ann Hornaday gave it two out of four stars, noting that Lear’s “contributions are duly celebrated in [a] profile of a man who, at 93 [now 94], still has it gratifyingly together.”

“Adam Ruins Everything Election Special”

Tuesday, Oct. 25

10 on TruTV

The host of “Adam Ruins Everything” turns his eye to the 2016 campaign, to see if he can make it just that much worse for us.

“Hamilton’s Pharmacopeia”

Wednesday, Oct. 26

10 on Viceland

Travelogue based on the Vice docuseries in which host Hamilton Morris travels the world to check out unusual psychoactive drugs.

“Everest Air”

Wednesday, Oct. 26

10 on Travel

Six-part docuseries follows Mount Everest expert, adventurer and rescue medic Jeff Evans and his crew up the 29,029-foot peak.

“American Humane Association Hero Dog Awards”

Friday, Oct. 28

8 on Hallmark

An awards show for really, really good dogs.

“Bill Murray: The Mark Twain Prize”

Friday, Oct. 28

9, check local listings on PBS

Telecast of the Kennedy Center’s Oct. 23 salute to the actor who starred in “Groundhog Day,” “Caddyshack,” “Ghostbusters,” “Lost in Translation” and more.

“Tracey Ullman’s Show”

Friday, Oct. 28

11 on HBO

Six-episode sketch comedy series marks Ullman’s return to HBO, portraying an array of characters across the pond, including Dame Judi Dench and Angela Merkel.

“Paranormal Lockdown”

Monday, Oct. 31

9 on Destination America

Two-hour special in which ghost hunters lock themselves in a Yorkshire, England, house believed to be rife with violent poltergeists.

“People of Earth”

Monday, Oct. 31

9 on TBS

Comedy about a support group for people who’ve been abducted by aliens. Stars Wyatt Cenac (“The Daily Show”).

“Brief Encounters”

Monday, Oct. 31

on Acorn TV streaming

British dramedy about four women who get an eye-opening experience when they go to work for a company that sells lingerie and sex toys.

“Stan Against Evil”

Wednesday, Nov. 2

10 on IFC

Horror-comedy series stars John C. McGinley (“Scrubs”) as a disgruntled former sheriff of a New England town who reluctantly teams up with his successor (Janet Varney) to fight a plague of demons.

“The Crown”

Friday, Nov. 4

on Netflix streaming

From “The Queen” writer Peter Morgan comes this 10-episode drama about young Queen Elizabeth II (“Wolf Hall’s” Claire Foy), her marriage to Philip Mountbatten (“Doctor Who’s” Matt Smith) in 1947 and the events leading to her ascension to the throne in 1952.

“Dana Carvey: Straight White Male, 60”

Friday, Nov. 4

on Netflix streaming

Comedy special from the SNL alum who used to delight us with Church Lady and “choppin’ broccolayyyyy.”

“Karen Carpenter: Goodbye to Love”

Sunday, Nov. 5

9 on Reelz

Documentary about the sister half of the chart-topping 1970s sibling duo, and her death in 1983 after struggling for years with an eating disorder.

“Deep Water”

Monday, Nov. 7

on Acorn TV streaming

Four-part Australian crime thriller starring Yael Stone (“Orange Is the New Black”) and Noah Taylor (“Game of Thrones”) as a pair of detectives assigned to a brutal murder case.

“Soundbreaking: Stories From the Cutting Edge of Recorded Music”

Monday, Nov. 14

10, check local listings on PBS

Eight-episode docuseries explores the impact of recorded music on the modern world.

“Close to the Enemy”

Monday, Nov. 14

on Acorn TV streaming

Cold War drama (an original series from Acorn) about a retiring British army captain (Jim Sturgess) whose last assignment is to oversee a captured German scientist (August Diehl) who is working on a new engine for the royal air force.

“Black America Since MLK: And Still I Rise”

Tuesday, Nov. 15

8, check local listings on PBS

Two-part, four-hour documentary (Nov. 15 and 22) from Henry Louis Gates Jr. looks at the past 50 years of African American history, charting the progress made and obstacles that remain.

“Good Behavior”

Tuesday, Nov. 15

9 on TNT

In a wild departure from Lady Mary, “Downton Abbey’s” Michelle Dockery stars in this drama about a thief and con artist trying to get regain control of her life and her ill-advised actions — but not for long.

“Nightcap”

Wednesday, Nov. 16

8 on Pop

Ten-episode comedy series stars Ali Wentworth as a booker on a late-night talk show.

“Undercover”

Thursday, Nov. 17

on BBC America, check listings

Six-episode drama about a lawyer who is about to become England’s top public prosecutor, right as she’s struggling with a death-row case and worrying that her husband’s sordid past will become news.

“Beat Bugs”

Friday, Nov. 18

on Netflix streaming

Animated children’s series about singing insects answers the question of how else to further exploit the Beatles’ vast catalogue of beloved songs.

“Colin Quinn: The New York Story”

Friday, Nov. 18

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special from yet another SNL alum.

“Zero Days”

Saturday, Nov. 19

9 on Showtime

Television premiere of Alex Gibney’s well-reviewed documentary about the frightening outcomes of an all-out cyberwar.

“Marathon: The Patriots’ Day Bombing”

Monday, Nov. 21

on HBO

Documentary about the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing, as told through the individuals whose lives were affected.

“Search Party”

Monday, Nov. 21

11 on TBS

Week-long marathon premiere (through Nov. 25) of the entire season of this new dark comedy about four self-absorbed 20-somethings who get involved in the search for a college friend who has gone missing.

“Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life”

Friday, Nov. 25

on Netflix streaming

Lauren Graham and Alexis Bledel return to fictional Stars Hollow, Conn., as fans of the original “Gilmore Girls” (which ran from 2001 to 2007) lose their minds. Four 90-minute episodes update and put the official finishing touches on Amy Sherman Palladino’s beloved series.

“Michael Che Matters”

Friday, Nov. 25

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special from the co-host of SNL’s “Weekend Update.”

“Savage Kingdom”

Friday, Nov. 25

9 on Nat Geo Wild

Nature docuseries about wild predators in Africa. Narrated by Charles Dance (“Game of Thrones”).

“Dolly Parton’s Christmas of Many Colors: Circle of Love”

Wednesday, Nov. 30

9 on NBC

The cast from last year’s warmly received “Coat of Many Colors” returns for another tale drawn from Dolly’s girlhood memories — this time about a devastating event that affects the Parton clan, and the seeming miracle that follows as Christmas arrives.

“Incorporated”

Wednesday, Nov. 30

10 on Syfy

Futuristic thriller about a corporate drone (Sean Teale) who gets a revolutionary bent. Dennis Haysbert and Julia Ormand co-star.

“Mariah’s World”

Sunday, Dec. 4

9 on E!

On the one hand, it’s just another reality show that follows a celebrity around through what is supposedly her daily life. On the other hand, it’s Mariah Carey.

“The Level”

Monday, Dec. 5

on Acorn TV streaming

Six-part British crime drama from Acorn and ITV about a reputable detective (Karla Crome) who secretly covers for a drug trafficker (Philip Glenister) she has known since childhood.

“Reggie Watts: Spatial”

Tuesday, Dec. 6

on Netflix streaming

Comedy special from CBS’s “Late Late Show” bandleader.

“Hairspray Live!”

Wednesday, Dec. 7

8 on NBC

This year’s live musical from NBC is the Broadway hit about teenagers and integration in Baltimore in the early 1960s, based on the 1988 John Waters film. Harvey Fierstein reprises his Tony-winning role as Edna Turnblad. Other cast members include Martin Short, Kristin Chenoweth, Ariana Grande and Jennifer Hudson.

“Shut Eye”

Wednesday, Dec. 7

on Hulu streaming

Drama series about storefront psychics in Los Angeles and the organized crime syndicate that controls their lives.

“Captive”

Friday, Dec. 9

on Netflix streaming

Docuseries examines true-crime stories that involved hostage-taking.

“Critics’ Choice Awards”

Sunday, Dec. 11

8 on A&E

Awards show for the best TV shows and movies, as picked by broadcast critics. “Silicon Valley’s” T.J. Miller hosts.

“Great Performances: The Hollow Crown — The Wars of the Roses”

Sunday, Dec. 11

9, check local listings on PBS

Three-part film adaptations of Shakespeare’s “Henry VI” (I and II) and “Richard III.”

“Tony Bennett Celebrates 90: The Best Is Yet to Come”

Tuesday, Dec. 20

9 on NBC

Musical salute to the singer, who turned 90 in August.

“Gabriel Iglesias: I’m Sorry for What I Said When I Was Hungry”

Tuesday, Dec. 20

on Netflix streaming

Stand-up comedy special.

“The 39th Annual Kennedy Center Honors”

Tuesday, Dec. 27

9 on CBS

Telecast of the Dec. 4 ceremony, which will honor pianist Martha Argerich; actor Al Pacino; rock legends the Eagles; blues/gospel singer Mavis Staples; and singer-songwriter James Taylor.

Returning this season

Still worth a look

“2 Broke Girls”

Monday, Oct. 10

9 on CBS

“19-2”

Monday, Oct. 24

on Acorn TV

“48 Hours”

Saturday, Sept. 24

10 on CBS

“60 Minutes”

Sunday, Sept. 25

7:30 on CBS

“90 Day Fiance”

Sunday, Sept. 11

9 on TLC

“The Affair”

Sunday, Nov. 20

10 on Showtime

“America’s Funniest Home Videos”

Sunday, Oct. 2

7 on ABC

“American Horror Story: My Roanoke Nightmare”

Wednesday, Sept. 14

10 on FX

“Arrow”

Wednesday, Oct. 5

8 on CW

“Ash vs. Evil Dead”

Sunday, Oct. 2

8 on Starz

“Balls Deep”

Thursday, Oct. 27

10 on Viceland

“Below Deck”

Tuesday, Sept. 6

9 on Bravo

“The Big Bang Theory”

Monday, Sept. 19

8 on CBS

“Black Mirror”

Friday, Oct. 21

on Netflix

“Black-ish”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

9:30 on ABC

“The Blacklist”

Thursday, Sept. 22

10 on NBC

“Blindspot”

Wednesday, Sept. 14

8 on NBC

“Blue Bloods”

Friday, Sept. 23

10 on CBS

“Blunt Talk”

Sunday, Oct. 2

8:35 on Starz

“Bob’s Burgers”

Sunday, Sept. 25

7:30 on Fox

“Brooklyn Nine-Nine”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

8 on Fox

“Caught on Camera With Nick Cannon”

Friday, Sept. 23

8 on NBC

“Chicago Fire”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

10 on NBC

“Chicago Med”

Thursday, Sept. 22

9 on NBC

“Chicago P.D.”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

10 on NBC

“The Code”

Monday, Oct. 10

on Acorn TV

“Code Black”

Wednesday, Sept. 28

10 on CBS

“Comedy Bang! Bang!”

Friday, Oct. 28

11 on IFC

“Comic Book Men”

Sunday, Oct. 23

midnight on AMC

“Crazy Ex-Girlfriend”

Friday, Oct. 21

9 on CW

“Criminal Minds”

Wednesday, Sept. 28

9 on CBS

“DC’s Legends of Tomorrow”

Thursday, Oct. 13

8 on CW

“Dance Moms”

Tuesday, Sept. 6

9 on Lifetime

“Dancing With the Stars”

Monday, Sept. 12

8 on ABC

“Dateline”

Friday, Sept. 23

9 on NBC

“Documentary Now!”

Wednesday, Sept. 14

10 on IFC

“Don’t Be Tardy ...”

Wednesday, Sept. 14

10 on Bravo

“Dr. Ken”

Friday, Sept. 23

8:30 on ABC

“Drunk History”

Tuesday, Sept. 27

10:30 on Comedy Central

“Elementary”

Sunday, Oct. 2

10 on CBS

“Empire”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

9 on Fox

“Family Guy”

Sunday, Sept. 25

9 on Fox

“Fear the Walking Dead”

Sunday, Aug. 21

9 on AMC

“The Flash”

Tuesday, Oct. 4

8 on CW

“Fresh Off the Boat”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

9 on ABC

“From Dusk Till Dawn: The Series”

Tuesday, Sept. 6

9 on El Rey

“The Goldbergs”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

8 on ABC

“Gotham”

Monday, Sept. 19

8 on Fox

“Grey’s Anatomy”

Thursday, Sept. 22

8 on ABC

“Halt and Catch Fire”

Tuesday, Aug. 23

9 on AMC

“Hawaii Five-O”

Friday, Sept. 23

9 on CBS

“Hell’s Kitchen”

Friday, Sept. 23

8 on Fox

“Homeland”

Sunday, Jan. 15

9 on Showtime

“How to Get Away With Murder”

Thursday, Sept. 22

10 on ABC

“Impastor”

Wednesday, Sept. 28

10:30 on TV Land

“Jane the Virgin”

Monday, Oct. 17

9 on CW

“Last Man on Earth”

Sunday, Sept. 25

9:30 on Fox

“Last Man Standing”

Friday, Sept. 23

8 on ABC

“Law & Order: SVU”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

9 on NBC

“The Librarians”

Sunday, Nov. 20

8 on TNT

“Life in Pieces”

Thursday, Oct. 27

9:30 on CBS

“Longmire”

Friday, Sept. 23

on Netflix

“Lucifer”

Monday, Sept. 19

9 on Fox

“Madam Secretary”

Sunday, Oct. 2

9 on CBS

“The Man in the High Castle”

Friday, Dec. 16

on Amazon

“Manzo’d With Children”

Sunday, Sept. 11

9 on Bravo

“Marvel’s Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

10 on ABC

“Masterpiece: Indian Summers”

Sunday, Sept.11

10 on PBS

“Masterpiece: Poldark”

Sunday, Sept. 25

8, check local listings on PBS

“Masters of Sex”

Sunday, Sept. 11

10 on Showtime

“The Middle”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

8 on ABC

“The Mindy Project”

Tuesday, Oct. 4

on Hulu

“Modern Family”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

9 on ABC

“Mom”

Thursday, Oct. 27

9 on CBS

“Mozart in the Jungle”

Friday, Dec. 9

on Amazon

“Narcos”

Friday, Sept. 2

on Netflix

“Nashville”

Thursday, Jan. 5

9 on CMT

“NCIS”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

9 on CBS

“NCIS: Los Angeles”

Sunday, Sept. 25

8:30 on CBS

“NCIS: New Orleans”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

10 on CBS

“New Girl”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

8:30 on Fox

“Odd Couple”

Monday, Oct. 17

9:30 on CBS

“Once Upon a Time”

Sunday, Sept. 25

8 on ABC

“A Place to Call Home”

Thursday, Nov. 24

on Acorn TV

“Project Runway”

Thursday, Sept. 15

9 on Lifetime

“Quantico”

Sunday, Sept. 25

10 on ABC

“The Ranch”

Friday, Oct. 7

on Netflix

“Raised by Wolves”

Monday, Nov. 21

on Acorn TV

“Real Husbands of Hollywood”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

9 on BET

“The Real O’Neals”

Tuesday, Oct. 11

9:30 on ABC

“Rectify”

Wednesday, Oct. 26

10 on Sundance TV

“Red Oaks”

Friday, Nov. 11

on Amazon

“Rosewood”

Thursday, Sept. 22

8 on Fox

“The Royals”

Sunday, Dec. 4

10 on E!

“Salem”

Wednesday, Nov. 2

10 on WGN America

“Saturday Night Live”

Saturday, Oct. 1

11:30 on NBC

“Scorpion”

Monday, Oct. 3

9 on CBS

“Scream Queens”

Tuesday, Sept. 20

9 on Fox

“Secrets and Lies”

Sunday, Sept. 25

9 on ABC

“Shameless”

Sunday, Oct. 2

9 on Showtime

“Shark Tank”

Friday, Sept. 23

9 on ABC

“The Simpsons”

Sunday, Sept. 25

8 on Fox

“South Park”

Wednesday, Sept. 14

10 on Comedy Central

“Star Talk With Neil deGrasse Tyson”

Monday, Sept. 19

11 on National Geographic Channel

“Star Wars Rebels”

Saturday, Sept. 24

8:30 on Disney XD

“The Strain”

Sunday, Aug. 28

10 on FX

“Supergirl”

Monday, Oct. 10

8 on CW

“Supernatural”

Thursday, Oct. 13

9 on CW

“Superstore”

Thursday, Sept. 22

8 on NBC

“Survivor”

Wednesday, Sept. 21

8 on CBS

“Talking Dead”

Sunday, Oct. 23

10 on AMC

“Those Who Can’t”

Thursday, Oct. 6

10:30 on TruTV

“Through the Wormhole With Morgan Freeman”

Tuesday, Aug. 30

10 on Science Channel

“Tosh.0”

Tuesday, Sept. 27

10 on Comedy Central

“Transparent”

Friday, Sept. 23

on Amazon

“The Vampire Diaries”

Friday, Oct. 21

8 on CW

“Vikings”

Wednesday, Nov. 30

9 on History

“The Voice”

Monday, Sept. 19

8 on NBC

“The Walking Dead”

Sunday, Oct. 23

9 on AMC

“Younger”

Wednesday, Sept. 28

10 on TV Land

“You’re the Worst”

Wednesday, Aug. 31

10 on FXX

“Z Nation”

Friday, Sept. 16

8 on Syfy

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