Where Tom went:

Restaurant

Artisan Meat Share

It's charcuterie central from the meat-mad chef at Cypress, Craig Deihl, whose two-fisted sandwiches pack braunschweiger and Swiss cheese between slices of potato bread; and pâté, smoked ham, soy pickles and kimchi mayonnaise inside loaf-size steamed buns.

33 Spring St.

843-641-7299

artisanmeatsharecharleston.com

Bar

The Bar at Husk

Mere steps away from the mansion housing Husk restaurant, the rustic wood-and-brick bar is a celebration of brown water (bourbon and whiskey), punches, cider and other liquid pleasures.

76 Queen St.

843-577-2500

huskrestaurant.com

Bar

The Belmont

The lighting is dim, the bar is brown and the gentlemen behind it sport ties. While you revel in classic cocktails, movies are (silently) screened on the rear wall.

511 King St.

thebelmontcharleston.com

Restaurant

Bertha's Kitchen

Expect to wait in line, along with a cross section of blue collars and business suits, inside this bright blue soul food source in an industrial area. Warm corn bread, zesty fried chicken, peppery collard greens and brick-colored okra soup are your rewards.

2332 Meeting Street Rd.

843-554-6519

Market

Charleston City Market

A National Historic Landmark, this airy arcade of market stalls attracts fanny-packers and others in search of souvenirs: stone-ground grits, books by local authors and sweetgrass baskets originally made to separate husks from grains of rice on area plantations.

188 Meeting Pl.

843-937-0920

www.thecharlestoncitymarket.com

Store

Charleston Cooks

Want to replicate a taste of the low country at home? Sign up for a class at this one-stop shop for cooking utensils, cookbooks and mementos, including benne wafers.

194 E. Bay St.

843-722-1212

www.charlestoncooks.com

Market

Charleston Farmers Market

In historic Marion Square Park, just over 100 farmers and growers, prepared-food makers and craftspeople sell their wares at this award-winning market, open on Saturdays from April through November (plus some Sundays in May, June and December).

329 Meeting St.

843-724-7305

charlestonfarmersmarket.com

Restaurant

Dave's Carry-Out

Forget the carryout idea and eat your fried-to-order whiting, shrimp or pork chop at one of the handful of stools or card tables inside this bare-bones storefront; the best side dish is a chat with the cook in her open kitchen.

42 C Morris St.

843-577-7943

Restaurant/Bar

Edmund's Oast

On tap: 40 beers, some of them brewed on-site. This sweeping stage set of a Southern tavern also features a broad chef's counter that lets patrons watch their meals unfold. Try the chicken porridge, made with Carolina gold rice and blue crab.

1081 Morrison Dr.

843-727-1145

edmundsoast.com

Restaurant

Fig

Asked to name a favorite place to eat, locals inevitably reply "Fig," the gracious lair of chef Mike Lata. The cooking nods to Italy and France while using what's found in local waters and pastures. In your fish stew: rouille, but also Carolina gold rice.

232 Meeting St.

843-805-5900

eatatfig.com

Bar/Restaurant

The Gin Joint

Pad Thai popcorn? Duck empanadas? The cooks seem to have as much fun as the bartenders here, where the pre-Prohibition drinks list eschews anything made with vodka.

182 E. Bay St.

843-577-6111

theginjoint.com

Restaurant

Hominy Grill

If you have time for only one plate of shrimp and grits, make it chef Robert Stehling's recipe, laced with bacon and mushrooms and served beneath a pressed-tin ceiling and slow-circling fans.

207 Rutledge Ave.

843-937-0930

hominygrill.com

Restaurant

Husk

The most famous restaurant in the city, from the esteemed Sean Brock, a son of Virginia who first made a name for himself at McCrady's. Southern comfort can be found in pig ear lettuce wraps, pimento cheese crostini, "real" corn bread, and shrimp and grits.

76 Queen St.

843-577-2500

huskrestaurant.com

Restaurant

Leon's Fine Poultry & Oysters

The name steers you to the best of the menu: grilled oysters and spicy fried chicken. Garage doors and concrete floors hark back to the restaurant's earlier life as a car shop.

698 King St.

843-531-6500

leonsoystershop.com

Restaurant

Martha Lou's Kitchen

A pink shack with a big heart near the railroad tracks (hear the whistle?), Martha Lou's does soul food proud. Go for the bursting-with-juices fried shrimp or chicken, and don't miss the lima beans bolstered with smoked pork.

1068 Morrison Dr.

843-577-9583

marthalouskitchen.com

Restaurant

McCrady's

The dowager on the dining scene, McCrady's can trace its roots back more than 200 years. Such dishes as ember-grilled sunchokes with creamed lettuces and mint -- and a $115 tasting menu spanning three snacks and seven courses -- plant diners firmly in 2015.

2 Unit Alley

843-577-0025

mccradysrestaurant.com

Restaurant

Minero

Sean Brock does Mexican. Which means the tortillas are made from scratch, using heirloom corn ground twice a day, and the tacos include fried catfish with pickled-green-tomato tartar. Shrimp and masa grits with chili sofrito are untraditional but also wonderful.

155 E. Bay St.

843-789-2241

minerorestaurant.com

Restaurant

The Obstinate Daughter

Worth the 20-minute drive from Charleston: Frogmore chowder and spaghetti with local clams, presented in a second-floor nautical setting that sidesteps cliches.

2063 Middle St., Sullivan's Island

843-416-5020

theobstinatedaughter.com

Restaurant

The Ordinary

Anything but ordinary, this seafood attraction -- a sister to Fig set in a former bank -- impresses diners with its art deco bones and sublime surf. Cue the hush puppies stuffed with diver scallops and served with chowchow tartar sauce.

544 King St.

843-414-7060

eattheordinary.com

Store

Preservation Society of Charleston

The organization maintains a shop in its Victorian-era building stocked with low-country gift ideas, including cookbooks, maps of long-ago Charleston, biscuit mixes and oyster ceramic ware.

147 King St.

843-722-4630

preservationsociety.org

Restaurant/Store

Two Boroughs Larder

A reminder that this port city has a history of welcoming outside influences, this modern mom-and-pop is known for infusing local ingredients with foreign accents. (Hope for pork neck with Chinese greens.) For sale on the shelves: tea towels, farm eggs and Geechie Boy Mill grits, thoughtfully paired with a cast-iron skillet.

186 Coming St.

843-637-3722

twoboroughslarder.com

Restaurant

Xiao Bao Biscuit

An industry hangout serving Asian fusion, the good kind, in an old gas station. Make room for a Vietnamese-inspired vegetable terrine, Japanese-style cabbage pancakes and a mushroom egg roll that bridges China and the States.

224 Rutledge Ave.

xiaobaobiscuit.com