Where Tom went:

Restaurant

ABC Kitchen

An extension of ABC Carpet & Home, this picture in white from esteemed chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten tilts natural and luscious at lunch with cold-pressed juices, lemony crab toast, whole-wheat pizza scattered with spinach and goat cheese, and whimsies including pretzel-dusted squid. Lunch also yields a deal: three courses for $33.

35 E. 18th St

212-475-5829

www.abchome.com/eat/abc-kitchen

Restaurant

Aquavit

A rare and wonderful taste of Nordic cuisine from chef Emma Bengtsson in an austere Midtown setting, Aquavit entices fans with an exquisite herring sampler; Swedish meatballs with lingonberries; and kroppkakor (dumplings), along with the option of washing back a meal with potent house-made aquavit in a dozen intriguing flavors.

65 E. 55th St.

212-307-7311

www.aquavit.org

Restaurant

Balthazar

Ask a discerning local to name the restaurant that sums up New York, and “Balthazar” is the likely response. “It’s inspired by French brasseries, but very American, and it looks like it’s been around forever,” says no less than Eric Ripert, the chef of Le Bernardin. Of course, it’s cramped, and of course, it’s loud.

80 Spring St.

212-965-1414

balthazarny.com

Store

Bonnie Slotnick Cookbooks

A food fan could spend hours browsing in Slotnick’s homey shop in the East Village, which stocks a collection of more than 4,000 titles, a mix that includes old Sunbeam recipe pamphlets and menus from trains and ocean liners (along with vintage aprons and other culinary ephemera). Pets are welcome, as are children, who get a nook and a table of their own. Out back: a garden for reading.

28 E. Second St.

212-989-8962

www.bonnieslotnickcookbooks.com

Restaurant

Carbone

Bring an appetite, a fat wallet and a sense of humor to this over-the-top celebration of yesteryear’s red-sauce joints. Enough for two, the veal parm costs $64. But it’s the best marriage of meat, cheese and fried basil of your life, dropped off by a waiter who could have stepped out of a mob movie while Sinatra is singing “Love Is a Many-Splendored Thing.”

181 Thompson St.

212-254-3000

carbonenewyork.com

Bar

The Dead Rabbit

Honored at the Tales of the Cocktail conference this summer with two prestigious awards — World’s Best Bar and World’s Best Cocktail Menu — the Dead Rabbit unfolds across three floors in the Financial District.

30 Water St.

646-422-7906

www.deadrabbitnyc.com

Bakery

Dominique Ansel Bakery

The world knows Dominique Ansel as the creator of the cronut, the love child of a croissant and a doughnut that spawned countless imitators. Visitors to his slim bakery in SoHo can also testify to the pastry maven’s wonderful way with multi-flavored Mini-Me (miniature meringues), after-school cookie shots, “cotton-soft” cheesecake and kouign-amann.

189 Spring St.

212-219-2773

dominiqueansel.com

Market

Eataly

Celebrity chef Mario Batali, a partner in the project, has described this 50,000-square-foot emporium near Madison Square Park as a grocery store with tasting rooms. Birreria, one of several places therein to eat and drink, pours cask ales and serves fried sweetbreads with tuna sauce, among other lures, on Eataly’s rooftop.

200 Fifth Ave.

212-229-2560

www.eataly.com/us_en/stores/new-york

Store

Fishs Eddy

Whether you’re in the market for a sugar bowl labeled in Brooklynese (“shuguh”), vintage yokes for hanging pots and pans, or just a set of dinnerware or dish towels, this housewares emporium near Gramercy Park lets you fulfill your shopping list.

889 Broadway

212-420-9020

www.fishseddy.com

Store

Florence Prime Meat Market

Adam Rapoport, the editor of Bon Appétit, buys his meat here. So does Mimi Sheraton, the legendary food critic. Dressed with little more than family photos on the walls and sawdust on the floor, this slip of a butcher shop lives up to its name: The meat is prime, the steaks are dry-aged in-house and everything is cut to order. Florence’s claim to fame is its signature Newport, a triangle-shaped center cut of sirloin.

Five Jones St.

212-242-6531

(no Web site)

Restaurant

Franny’s

A Berkeley vibe courses through this neighborly Italian restaurant in Brooklyn, home to fine pastas and peerless Neapolitan pizzas baked in wood-fired ovens. Expect the cocktails to rock, the coffee to be fair-trade and the menus to be printed on recycled paper.

348 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn

718-230-0221

frannysbrooklyn.com

Restaurant

Ganesh Temple Canteen

Outftted with rows of folding chairs and metal tables, with religious cartoons playing on overhead TVs, this popular cafeteria in the basement of a temple in residential Flushing could pass for a church basement. But the aromas wafting from the kitchen whet an appetite for South Indian cooking. Crisp, kite-shaped crepes made from rice and lentils, and eaten with a choice of mild-to-wild vegetarian fillings, are a major draw.

45-57 Bowne St., Flushing

718-460-8493

www.nyganeshtemplecanteen.com

Restaurant

Gray’s Papaya

Count Ruth Reichl a fan of this round-the-clock hot dog joint with the juicy franks and lord-knows-what in the tropical drinks. “If you’re a New Yorker, it’s in your blood,” says the former editor of Gourmet. Songs have been written about the place, and more than a few TV and film characters have professed their affection.

2090 Broadway

212-799-0243

grayspapayanyc.com

Restaurant

Hometown Bar-B-Que

Billy Durney, a security agent turned pit master, does right by brisket, smoky baked beans and collard greens in a barn of a barbecue joint in Red Hook. The sleeper of the lot: pulled lamb. Pluses include live music Thursdays through Saturdays and margaritas sweetened with peaches.

454 Van Brunt St., Brooklyn

347-294-4644

www.hometownbarbque.com

Restaurant

Kang Ho Dong Baekjeong (Manhattan)

The New York food mafia’s choice for meat grilled at the table in Koreatown (Anthony Bourdain has been in), this is an outpost of a popular South Korean chain. (Another branch, in Flushing, is under different management.)

One E. 32nd St.

212-966-9839

baekjeongnyc.com

Store

Kalustyan’s

Name a spice you need, and Kalustyan’s has it. Roaming the aisles of this epic pantry in Murray Hill is like walking around the globe.

123 Lexington Ave.

212-685-3451

www.kalustyans.com

Deli

Katz’s Delicatessen

Don’t even think about waiter service. Part of the fun of a run to this icon on the Lower East Side is taking a ticket, getting in line, enjoying a gratis taste of the glorious pastrami/corned beef/brisket before it’s piled into a rye sandwich (say yes to the garlicky pickles) and finding a seat in the clattery dining room plastered with celebrity mug shots. Just remember to tip the counterman and wash back the feast with a fizzy egg cream.

205 E. Houston St.

212-254-2246

katzsdelicatessen.com

Restaurant

Le Bernardin

The restaurant that raised the bar for seafood establishments in the country when it opened almost 30 years ago continues to lead by example, thanks to chef Eric Ripert and a stellar crew of cooks, waiters and hosts. A recent repast netted charred calamari on a pool of Basque sauce, poached skate set against a golden kimchi broth, and a contemporary Pavlova with tropical fruit.

155 W. 51st St.

212-554-1515

www.le-bernardin.com

Bar

Maison Premiere

Possibly the most romantic bar in Brooklyn is the petite, U-shaped marble counter at which absinthe and oysters serve as the signatures. Imagine if the French Quarter were airlifted to Williamsburg. Better yet, order the French Roulette, a rival to the Sazerac, in the company of someone you care about.

298 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

347-335-0446

maisonpremiere.com

Restaurant

Marlow & Sons

One diner’s definition of perfection in Williamsburg: a table straddling inside and patio, weather permitting; a short menu of dishes, each intriguing in a different way (spicy yogurt with Sungold tomatoes and eggplant); and service that feels as if family is taking care of you. To order the brick-pressed chicken is to see why the classic has been on the list for more than a decade.

81 Broadway, Brooklyn

718-384-1441

marlowandsons.com

Restaurant

Momofuku Noodle Bar

Eleven years after it made its debut in the East Village and rocketed David Chang to world renown, the first of the Momofuko brands continues to thrill with its menu, slightly less for the signature bowls than for the buns (go for shrimp with spicy mayo).

171 First Ave.

212-777-7773

momofuku.com/new-york/noodle-bar

Store

Morgenstern’s Finest Ice Cream

New York’s “it” ice cream parlor delivers on its name with scoops of egg-free ice cream in true-tasting flavors. Spring for the breezy mint, the spicy Sichuan peppercorn or the heavenly angel food.

Two Rivington St.

212-209-7684

www.morgensternsnyc.com

Store

Murray’s

One of the premiere cheese stores in the country, this fragrant fixture in Greenwich Village since 1940 entices fromage fans with wares from around the world, in-store classes and just about everything (charcuterie, spreads) you’d want to eat with the house specialties.

254 Bleecker St.

212-243-3289

www.murrayscheese.com

Store

OddFellows Ice Cream Co.

A window behind the front counter lets visitors see the house draw, available in such fun flavors as miso-cherry and corn bread, being made in small batches. Popsicles for the over-21 set include strawberry daiquiri; the delicious waffle cones are made on site.

175 Kent Ave., Brooklyn

347-599-0556

www.oddfellowsnyc.com

Restaurant

Peter Luger’s

Arguably the most famous steakhouse in New York is in Brookyln. Here’s what you should know going in: The institution doesn’t take credit cards, the creamed spinach bests the German fried potatoes and the dry-aged porterhouse is the fan’s cut of choice. No need to commit that advice to memory; a no-nonsense waiter basically tells you what to order at the table of what could pass for a tavern.

178 Broadway, Brooklyn

718-387-7400

peterluger.com

Restaurant

Red Bowl Noodle Shop

Look no farther than the carryout window of the vast Red Bowl for instant street-food gratification: Among the finds is a plump Taiwanese sausage-within-a-sausage, its outer layer made from rice and playing the part of a bun.

40-52 Main St., Flushing

718-353-7683

(no Web site)

Restaurant

Russ & Daughters Cafe

“Regular or seltzer?” asks the server at this sit-down extension of the appetizing century-old store on the Lower East Side. Introduced last year, the cafe sports a retro look, with an old-fashioned soda fountain and backlit signs in black-and-white announcing sardines and rugelach. All good: chopped liver, pickled herring on pumpernickel, matzoh ball soup and -- cocktails!

127 Orchard St.

212-475-4881

www.russanddaughterscafe.com

Store

Sahadi's

A bazaar of Middle Eastern everything – seeds, spices, grains, coffee, halva -- watched over by a staff that treats everyone like a neighbor. If you try only one dish from the take-away section, make it a tub of the thick and garlicky hummus.

187 Atlantic Ave, Brooklyn

718-624-4550

www.sahadis.com

Restaurant

Shalom Japan

Chefs and owners Aaron Israel and Sawako Okochi merge their roots in a cozy corner space in South Williamsburg with a delightful hybrid menu that runs from glossy challah whose ingredients include sake lees to succulent pork chop schnitzel with tonkatsu. Among the drinks is the mezcal-fueled (ha!) L’Chaim Loca.

310 S. Fourth St., Brooklyn

718-388-4012

shalomjapannyc.com

Market

Smorgasburg (Williamsburg)

A spinoff of the popular Brooklyn Flea, Smorgasburg has been called “the Woodstock of Eating” by the New York Times. One hundred or so local vendors sell po' boys, pierogis, mofongo and one-bite cheesecakes against a stunning view of Manhattan on the Williamsburg waterfront. The long line in front of Goa Taco should tell you something: Coal-roasted pork belly and pickled red cabbage cradled in flaky paratha is amazing.

Kent Avenue and N. Seventh Street

(no number)

www.smorgasburg.com

Restaurant

Sushi Nakazawa

New York’s premiere omakase ($120 and worth every penny) commences in a hushed environment with a server introducing you to the condiments you’ll be tasting throughout the night, then sails on to some of the most pristine raw fish you can imagine. At the helm: Daisuke Nakazawa, an apprentice to the star of “Jiro Dreams of Sushi."

23 Commerce St.

212-924-2212

www.sushinakazawa.com

Restaurant

Tacos Morelos

Among food critic Robert Sietsema’s favorite pit stops in Jackson Heights is this dining room painted in the colors of the Mexican flag. The draws include a taco placero (“market taco”), stuffed with a rich chili relleno, and a liquor license -- rare, he says, for a non-gringo taqueria. Sí, the tortillas are made here.

94-13 37th Ave., Queens

347-832-0193

www.tacosmorelos.com

Store

Whisk

Whisks don’t begin to depict the scope here. The rambling housewares store also packs in Mason jars, cake stands, a nook devoted to cocktails, aprons, coffeemakers and Le Creuset pots in a rainbow of colors. Nice touch: a “Recipe of the Week,” available at the door.

231 Bedford Ave., Brooklyn

718-218-7230

www.whisknyc.com