Part I, Section I

Prosecutors build murder cases on disputed Shaken Baby Syndrome diagnosis

Interview

Mother acquitted of shaking a baby: ‘I would have committed suicide’

Part I, Section II

Doctors who defend shaking diagnosis dismiss scientific challenges

Interview

Prosecutor: ‘The public should know that this can kill’

Graphic

The unsettled science of Shaken Baby Syndrome

Part I, Section III

Mother released from prison: ‘It hurts too bad to remember’

Video

After five years in prison, a young mother is set free

Part I, Section IV

In Maryland, a baby collapses and a babysitter is blamed

Part I, Section V

Prosecutor to jurors: ‘Healthy babies just don't die’

Part I, Section VI

But that year, the case took a significant turn.

Interview

Babysitter once sentenced to 20 years in prison: ‘I’m not gonna say that I killed somebody’

Graphic

A breakdown of the dismissed cases

Graphic

Map: Parents and caregivers accused of shaking nationwide

Interview

Former medical examiner: ‘Alleged cases of pure shaking are unusual’

Part II, Section I

Doctors who diagnosed Shaken Baby Syndrome now defend the accused

Interview

Doctor who helped introduce the hypothesis behind Shaken Baby Syndrome: ‘I don’t think innocent people should be in jail’

Part II, Section II

A child abuse diagnosis raises questions, doubts

Interview

Accident reconstruction specialist: ‘We need to apply the science’

Part II, Section III

Engineers: Falls could be more dangerous than shaking

Graphic

A biomechanical look at shaking

Graphic

How much acceleration can be generated by shaking a 22-pound crash-test dummy

Part II, Section IV

Doctor: ‘What could be right about getting it wrong?’

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Shaken science

A disputed diagnosis imprisons parents

Former medical examiner: ‘Alleged cases of pure shaking are unusual’

You are reading one part of an investigative series on the disputed Shaken Baby Syndrome diagnosis that has put people behind bars.

Jonathan Arden, a forensic pathologist and former D.C. medical examiner, has been investigating deaths for 30 years. He suggests that doctors should be careful when diagnosing Shaken Baby Syndrome because the symptoms used to make the diagnosis could have alternative causes.

(Video by Zoeann Murphy/The Washington Post)