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The in-state share drops at universities

In-state enrollment as a share of total enrollment, 2004 to 2014

The University of Alabama had the largest decline in the share of in-state freshmen, a 36-point drop.

There were declines of 20 or more points at UC-Berkeley and UCLA, Idaho State University and the flagships of South Carolina, Missouri, Oregon and Arkansas.

There were also drops from 15 to 19 points at Michigan State, Ohio State, Purdue, Stony Brook, Colorado School of Mines and the universities of Illinois, Iowa, Kentucky, Maine and Washington.

There were drops from 10 to 14 points at numerous other schools, including Penn State, Indiana University and the University of Oklahoma.

For of these universities, the share of total revenue provided through state appropriations declined during the same period.

The chart above shows all schools analyzed that had declines of at least two points. Pop-up captions for each school also show trends in the share of annual revenue that comes from state appropriations, a key gauge of public support.

At least three factors drive schools to look for students from out of state: volatile or declining state funding; stagnant school-age population within the home state; and a desire to bring geographic diversity to campus for educational reasons. Sometimes in-state enrollment totals remain steady or rise slightly, but the out-of-state population will grow far more.

The balance is almost unchanged at universities

In-state enrollment as a share of total enrollment, 2004 to 2014

The in-state share at some schools remained relatively constant because of policies that limit or cap out-of-state enrollment. That was true for the University of North Carolina and the University of Virginia.

Texas A&M University had the highest in-state share of any school analyzed. That reflects the population growth of Texas and the market within the state.

Some schools, such as Alaska-Anchorage, Rhode Island College and Rutgers-Newark, have high in-state enrollment because they don’t have a large national profile.

For of these universities, the share of total revenue provided through state appropriations declined during the same period.

The chart above shows schools for which the in-state share was unchanged, up one point or down one point.

The in-state share rises at universities

In-state enrollment as a share of total enrollment, 2004 to 2014

The in-state share grew at least two points at a dozen universities, among them the flagships of Florida, Georgia, Maryland and Tennessee.

The share at Hawaii-Hilo, a small school in the island state, grew 16 points.

The large growth at the University of the District of Columbia, 28 points, should be read with caution because UDC is very different from the others analyzed and is based in the nation’s capital. UDC serves students seeking four-year degrees but also operates a community college.

For of these universities, the share of total revenue provided through state appropriations declined during the same period.