At least five police officers were killed and seven were wounded. Officers fatally shot include Patrick Zamarripa, Brent Thompson, Michael Krol, Lorne Ahrens and Michael Smith. At least two civilians were injured.

Four and a half hours of terror

El Centro

College

1

4

2

Parking

garage

35E

DALLAS

12

Area of detail

Downtown

30

To Fort Worth

35E

Oak Cliff

3

2 miles

35E

DALLAS

Dealey

Plaza

12

Area of detail

Downtown

30

To Fort Worth

35E

Old Red

Museum

Oak Cliff

JFK

Memorial

Plaza

3

4

2 miles

1

El Centro

College

Bank of

America

Plaza

Parking

garage

2

The Sixth Floor

Museum

35E

Dealey

Plaza

DALLAS

12

Area of detail

Downtown

30

To Fort Worth

Old Red

Museum

35E

Oak Cliff

El Centro

College

JFK

Memorial

Plaza

4

1

3

2 miles

Bank of

America

Plaza

Parking

garage

2

1 After two hours of a peaceful protest march, shots are fired from above at about 9 p.m. local time and the roughly 800 marchers scatter.

2 Police and attacker exchange gunfire; the heaviest shooting occurred around El Centro College. A video shot from a nearby apartment shows a man with an assault-style rifle shooting an officer in the back at point-blank range. Police believe this gunman fled inside the college.

3 Three suspects were detained. At some point, police see two suspects with a camouflage bag climb into a black Mercedes and speed off. They were stopped in the Oak Cliff neighborhood. A third suspect, a woman, was arrested near the El Centro garage.

2 miles

35E

DALLAS

12

Area of detail

30

Mercedes

stopped

2 miles

35E

DALLAS

12

30

Area of detail

Downtown

30

To Fort Worth

35E

Mercedes stopped

4 At the college, a gunman kept SWAT officers at bay for three hours, during which he told a hostage negotiator that he wanted to kill white people. According to a college spokeswoman, the gunman apparently entered through broken windows or entrances in A Building, took stairs to the second floor of B Building and crossed to C Building. About 1:26 a.m., a loud blast was reported. Police said Micah Xavier Johnson, 25, died on the second floor of C Building after police detonated a bomb attached to a robot.

Police used a robot to deliver a bomb, killing the shooter

Robots have carried explosives to breach doors or clear obstacles, but experts say this may be the first time a robot was used by police to kill a suspect. Dallas Police Chief David Brown said officers sent in the robot after hours of negotiations had failed. The device was a remote-controlled robot made by Northrup Grumman, specifically a Remotec Andros Mark V-A1. The department bought it in 2008 for about $151,000. Police placed a pound of C-4 explosive and detonation cord on its extension arm, and two officers operated it.

A look at the Andros Mark 5A-1

Weight

790 pounds

1

Top speed

3.5 mph

2

3

4

43”

48”

Color surveillance camera with light, featuring 26x optical zoom and 12x digital zoom

1

Extendable arm is capable of lifting 60 pounds fully extended and 145 pounds when retracted

2

Gripper with ability to continuously rotate

3

4

Large wheels and tracks allow navigation of steep slopes and

stairs

Color surveillance camera with light, featuring 26x optical zoom and 12x digital zoom

A look at the

Andros Mark 5A-1

Extendable arm is capable

of lifting 60 pounds fully

extended and 145 pounds

when retracted

Gripper with ability

to continuously rotate

Large wheels and

tracks allow navigation

of steep slopes and

stairs

Weight: 790 pounds

Top speed: 3.5 mph

43”

48”

The shooter was ‘upset about the recent police shootings’

Johnson was an Army reservist who deployed to Afghanistan in 2013. During negotiations, Johnson told authorities he “wanted to kill white people, especially white officers,” Dallas Police Chief David Brown said. His Facebook page shows Johnson raising a single fist in the air, a symbol associated with the Black Power movement of the 1960s. Dallas police said a search of Johnson’s Mesquite, Texas, home revealed ”bomb-making materials, ballistic vests, rifles, ammunition, and a personal journal of combat tactics.”

Six officers in Texas have been shot and killed in 2016

Twenty-six officers have been killed in firearms-related incidents so far this year, including the five killed in the Dallas attack. This represents a 44 percent increase over the same time in 2015, a spokesperson for the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund said.

1

2

3

6

WA

ME

MT

ND

OR

MN

MA

ID

WI

NY

SD

WY

MI

PA

IA

NE

NV

OH

IN

IL

UT

CO

WV

CA

VA

MD

KS

MO

KY

NC

TN

OK

AZ

AR

NM

SC

AL

GA

MS

LA

AK

TX

FL

1

2

3

6

WA

ME

MT

ND

OR

MN

MA

ID

WI

NY

SD

WY

MI

PA

IA

NE

NV

OH

IN

IL

UT

CO

WV

CA

VA

MD

KS

MO

KY

NC

TN

OK

AZ

AR

NM

SC

AL

GA

MS

LA

AK

TX

FL

Update: A previous version of this map also included officer deaths from traffic-related and other causes.

The deadliest attacks for law enforcement since Sept. 11, 2001

The Dallas protest march shooting has been the deadliest attack for law enforcement since 72 officers were killed in the attacks on the World Trade Center on Sept. 11, 2001.

Number of officers dead in the

same attack (  ) or accident (  ).

Dallas

4

72

5

’90

’00

’10

Number of officers dead in the same attack (  ) or accident (  ).

Dallas

4

4

5

8

11

72

4

4

5

’90

’95

’00

’05

’10

’15

July 7, 2016: At least five Dallas law enforcement officers were killed and six wounded when a sniper opened fire at a protest over recent police shootings. Four Dallas police officers and one Dallas Area Rapid Transit officer were killed by a lone gunman perched atop “elevated positions,” officials said.

One shooter engaged in a violent three-hour standoff with SWAT members. Police have confirmed that he was killed. Three other individuals have been taken into custody.

Nov. 29, 2009: Four police officers were shot and killed in a coffee shop in a suburb of Tacoma, Wash., by Maurice Clemmons, a man with an extensive criminal history. The victims were Mark Renninger, Ronald Owens, Tina Griswold and Greg Richards, each with at least eight years of law enforcement experience.

A two-day manhunt ensued and several people were arrested for helping the suspect evade capture. Clemmons was eventually shot and killed by a police officer when he refused to follow orders.

March 21, 2009: Two officers were shot and killed at a traffic stop in Oakland, and two more were shot hours later in a showdown with the perpetrator, Lovelle Mixon. Officer John Hege and Sgt. Mark Dunakin had stopped Mixon for a traffic violation when he opened fire on the officers, killing Hege and severely wounding Dunakin. He fled on foot, prompting a manhunt that shut down sections of Oakland roadways.

An anonymous tip brought SWAT team members to an apartment building. Mixon opened fire again, killing Sgt. Ervin Romans and Sgt. Daniel Sakai. Mixon was killed.

Sept. 11, 2001: The single deadliest day for law enforcement in U.S. history happened on Sept. 11, 2001, with the attacks on the World Trade Center. Seventy-two officers were killed while responding to the attacks in lower Manhattan, and dozens more died later from illnesses related to working in the hazardous conditions at the site of destruction.

Among the law enforcement officers who died were 23 officers from the NYPD, 37 officers from the Port Authority and NJPD, one officer from the NYC Fire Department, one officer from the FBI and one officer from the U.S. Secret Service.

More stories

Five police officers killed in Dallas, seven others wounded during protest

The gunfire was followed by a standoff that lasted for hours with a suspect who told authorities “he was upset about the recent police shootings.”

Dallas Police chief lost son, former partner and brother to violence

Few people understand loss better than David Brown, the Dallas police chief who stood before television cameras Friday morning and said, “We are heartbroken.”