President Trump signed an executive order on Jan. 27th temporarily barring entry to refugees and immigrants. In U.S. airports, customs officials detained and denied entry to individuals affected by the executive order.

A ruling by a federal judge in Seattle temporarily blocked the enforcement of the travel ban. The Trump administration appealed the ruling but a federal appeals court panel has maintained the freeze on President Trump’s immigration order, meaning previously barred refugees and citizens from seven Muslim-majority countries can continue entering the United States.

How the ban would impact different groups:

Citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

The State Department says previously banned travelers will be allowed to enter the United States. Those individuals with visas that were not physically cancelled may now travel if the visa is otherwise valid.

Dual nationals,

those who hold passports from more than one country

Citizens of one of the banned countries can enter if they present a valid passport from a non banned country.

Refugees around the world

The refugee program is suspended until further notice. The order suspends refugee entries for 120 days. Syrian refugees are barred indefinitely. More than 800 refugees considered “in transit” will be allowed in.

Green card holders, those who have legal residency in the United

States

The order does not apply to their entry into the United States, according to CBP.

Special Immigrant Visas holders

Iraqi translators who worked with U.S. troops will be given waivers.

Everyone who needs

to renew their visa

It suspends the waiver of visa interviews program at U.S. embassies and consulates around the world, requiring interviews for all visa applicants.

Dual nationals,

those who hold passports from more than one country

Citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

Citizens of one of the banned countries can enter if they present a valid passport from a non banned country.

The State Department says previously banned travelers will be allowed to enter the United States. Those individuals with visas that were not physically cancelled may now travel if the visa is otherwise valid.

Refugees around the world

Green card holders, those who have legal residency in the United States

The refugee program is suspended until further notice. The order suspends refugee entries for 120 days. Syrian refugees are barred indefinitely. More than 800 refugees considered “in transit” will be allowed in.

The order does not apply to their entry into the United States, according to CBP.

Special Immigrant Visas holders

Iraqi translators who worked with U.S. troops will be given waivers.

Some frequent travelers

The order suspends the Visa Interview Waiver Program, which allowed frequent visitors to the U.S. to skip an in-person interview at U.S. embassies and consulates. Now those interviews are required.

Citizens from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen

Dual nationals,

those who hold passports from more than one country

Refugees around the world

Green card holders, those who have legal residency in the United States

Some frequent travelers

The order suspends the Visa Interview Waiver Program, which allowed frequent visitors to the U.S. to skip an in-person interview at U.S. embassies and consulates. Now those interviews are required.

The refugee program is suspended until further notice. The order suspends refugee entries for 120 days. Syrian refugees are barred indefinitely. More than 800 refugees considered “in transit” will be allowed in.

The order does not apply to their entry into the United States, according to CBP.

The State Department says previously banned travelers will be allowed to enter the United States. Those individuals with visas that were not physically cancelled may now travel if the visa is otherwise valid.

Citizens of one of the banned countries can enter if they present a valid passport from a non banned country.

Special Immigrant Visas holders

Iraqi translators who worked with U.S. troops will be given waivers.

The order states the visa process “plays a crucial role” in stopping terrorists from entering the country. It mentions the Sept. 11, 2001, attacks as a key moment when the process failed. However, the hijackers were largely from Saudi Arabia – a country that is not on the travel ban. In addition, the ban does not include countries where people behind some of the most recent attacks were born. And despite the State Department deeming some countries like Pakistan and Afghanistan as “terrorist safe havens” in 2015, those nations didn’t make the list.

Is this executive order a ‘Muslim ban’?

The order doesn’t explicitly mention Muslims, Christians or any other religion, but it does give priority to refugees who belong to a religious minority. Trump’s later comments mentioned Christians in Syria as an example. In an interview with the Christian Broadcasting Network, Trump said it is “very tough” for Christians living in Syria to be accepted into the United States, a claim that remains questionable.

Trump has defended the executive order, saying that it is “not a Muslim ban” and played down concerns that the order has to do with religion. “This is about terror and keeping our country safe,” Trump said.

National security experts have criticized the president for alienating U.S. allies such as Iraq, where Iraqi interpreters who worked with U.S. troops previously have been given special visa preferences in the past.

The Pentagon launched an effort over the weekend to give them special consideration. On Tuesday, DHS clarified its stance and said special immigrant visa holders will be treated the same as green card holders. These individuals will now be allowed to board their flights to the U.S.

Those who frequently travel back and forth to the United States — such as business executives — will face another restriction: the suspension of the Visa Interview Waiver Program. The program allowed individuals to skip the in-person interview process at a U.S. consulate or embassy if they renew their visa often.

Now, repeat applicants who apply for a new visa must appear for an in-person interview.

How will the order impact the seven banned countries?

Country of concern

Sponsor of terrorism

TURKEY

SYRIA

LIBYA

AFGH.

IRAQ

IRAN

EGYPT

PAK.

SAUDI

ARABIA

CHAD

U.A.E.

OMAN

SUDAN

YEMEN

SOUTH

SUDAN

SOMALIA

ETHIOPIA

Detail

Kenya

Source: State Department

Country of concern

Sponsor of terrorism

ALGERIA

TURKEY

SYRIA

LIBYA

AFGH.

IRAQ

IRAN

NIGER

India

EGYPT

PAK.

SAUDI

ARABIA

U.A.E.

CHAD

OMAN

SUDAN

YEMEN

SOUTH

SUDAN

Detail

ETHIOPIA

CONGO

SOMALIA

Kenya

Source: State Department

Country of concern

Sponsor of terrorism

ALGERIA

TURKEY

SYRIA

LIBYA

AFGH.

IRAQ

IRAN

NIGER

EGYPT

PAK.

India

SAUDI

ARABIA

U.A.E.

CHAD

OMAN

SUDAN

YEMEN

SOUTH

SUDAN

Detail

ETHIOPIA

CONGO

SOMALIA

Kenya

Source: State Department

Visas from these seven countries, about 90,000 in total, were less than 1 percent of all U.S. visas given for permanent residence, as well as temporary travel, study and other reasons in 2015. This is the most current data available.

Iran, Iraq,

Libya, Somalia,

Sudan, Syria

and Yemen

0.8%

China

23.3%

TOTAL

11.4M

visas

Mexico

13.7%

Other

countries

Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia,

Sudan, Syria and Yemen

0.8%

China

23.3%

TOTAL

11.4M

visas

Other

countries

Mexico

13.7%

Of all the countries, Iran should have the most potential travelers affected by the ban. About half of the visas given in these seven countries were given to Iranians last year. The Post’s Fact Checker has more detail on this calculation.

Type of U.S. visas issued last

year in 7 affected countries

Fiscal 2015

Green

cards

Non-immigrant

(visitor, student, other)

Iran

42,542

Iraq

15,509

Syria

11,962

Yemen

7,668

Sudan

6,722

Libya

3,575

Somalia

1,409

0

20K

40K

Type of U.S. visas issued last year in 7 Affected countries

Fiscal 2015

Green

cards

Travel

(business, tourism)

Student

Other

0

10K

20K

30K

40K

42,542

Iran

Iraq

15,509

Syria

11,962

Yemen

7,668

Sudan

6,722

Libya

3,575

Somalia

1,409

0

10K

20K

30K

40K

What does it mean for refugees?

The country will not accept any refugees for the next four months, according to the order, while vetting procedures are reviewed. While the seven countries singled out for visa restrictions account for a relatively small portion of all visas, they were some of the biggest contributors of refugees to the United States in 2016.

On its way out of office, the Obama administration hoped the country would accept 110,000 refugees in fiscal 2017, which began in October. Admissions since then have kept pace to hit that ambitious goal, but Trump’s executive order cut the target by more than half, limiting it to 50,000 refugees. This means that while only a quarter of the fiscal year has transpired, the United States has already accepted about half of all the refugees it plans to accept in that time.

About 872 refugees who are considered to be in transit will be allowed to enter the country according to the Department of Homeland Security on Tuesday.

REFUGEE ADMISSIONS

BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN IN 2016

16,370

Congo

Syria

12,587

12,347

Burma

9,880

Iraq

9,020

Somalia

Bhutan

5,817

Iran

3,750

Afghanistan

2,737

Ukraine

2,543

Eritrea

1,949

Other

(including:

Sudan 1,428

Yemen 26

Libya 1)

7,994

ACCUMULATED REFUGEE

ADMISSIONS IN FISCAL YEAR 2017

50,000

Trump’s executive order determines 50,000 should be the limit of refugees in fiscal year 2017.

 

 

40,000

32,125

30,000

25,671

18,300

9,945

0

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

REFUGEE ADMISSIONS

BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN IN 2016

ACCUMULATED REFUGEE

ADMISSIONS IN FISCAL YEAR 2017

Trump’s executive order determines 50,000 should be the limit of refugees in fiscal year 2017.

 

 

50,000

16,370

Congo

40,000

Syria

12,587

32,125

30,000

12,347

Burma

25,671

9,880

Iraq

18,300

20,000

9,020

Somalia

Bhutan

5,817

9,945

Iran

3,750

10,000

Afghanistan

2,737

Ukraine

2,543

Eritrea

1,949

Other

(including:

Sudan 1,428

Yemen 26

Libya 1)

7,994

0

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

REFUGEE ADMISSIONS BY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN IN 2016

ACCUMULATED REFUGEE ADMISSIONS IN FISCAL YEAR 2017

Trump’s executive order determines 50,000 should be the limit of refugees in fiscal year 2017.

 

 

50,000

16,370

Congo

40,000

Syria

12,587

32,125

30,000

12,347

Burma

25,671

9,880

Iraq

18,300

20,000

9,020

Somalia

Bhutan

5,817

9,945

Iran

3,750

10,000

Afghanistan

2,737

Ukraine

2,543

Eritrea

1,949

Other

(including:

Sudan 1,428

Yemen 26

Libya 1)

7,994

0

OCT

NOV

DEC

JAN

Sources: White House, State Department, Refugee Processing Center, United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. Published Jan. 31.

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