The Internet works by chopping data into chunks called packets. Each packet then moves through the network in a series of     hops.

Sender

Entering the network

Each packet hops to a local Internet service provider (ISP), a company that offers access to the network -- usually for a fee.

Modem

Wireless

router

Taking flight

The next hop delivers the packet to a long-haul provider, one of the airlines of cyberspace that quickly carrying data across the world.

BGP

These providers use the Border Gateway Protocol to find a route across the many individual networks that together form the Internet.

Finding a route

This journey often takes several more hops, which are plotted out one by one as the data packet moves across the Internet.

Bad information

For the system to work properly, the BGP information shared among routers cannot contain lies or errors that might cause a packet to go off track – or get lost altogether.

Recipient’s ISP

Arrival

The final hop takes a packet to the recipient, which reassembles all of the packets into a coherent message. A separate message goes back through the network confirming successful delivery.

The Internet works by chopping data into chunks called packets. Each packet then moves through the network in a series of     hops.

Entering the network

Each packet hops to a local Internet service provider (ISP), a company that offers access to the network -- usually for a fee.

Sender

Modem

Wireless

router

Taking flight

The next hop delivers the packet to a long-haul provider, one of the airlines of cyberspace that quickly carrying data across the world.

BGP

These providers use the Border Gateway Protocol to find a route across the many individual networks that together form the Internet.

Finding a route

This journey often takes several more hops, which are plotted out one by one as the data packet moves across the Internet.

Bad information

For the system to work properly, the BGP information shared among routers cannot contain lies or errors that might cause a packet to go off track – or get lost altogether.

Recipient’s ISP

Arrival

The final hop takes a packet to the recipient, which reassembles all of the packets into a coherent message. A separate message goes back through the network confirming successful delivery.

The Internet works by chopping data into chunks called packets. Each packet then moves through the network in a series of     hops.

Sender

Wireless

router

Modem

Entering the network

Each packet hops to a local Internet service provider (ISP), a company that offers access to the network – usually for a fee.

Taking flight

The next hop delivers the packet to a long-haul provider, one of the airlines of cyberspace that quickly carrying data across the world.

BGP

These providers use the Border Gateway Protocol to find a route across the many individual networks that together form the Internet. This journey often takes several more hops, which are plotted out one by one as the data packet moves across the Internet.

Bad information

For the system to work properly, the BGP information shared among routers cannot contain lies or errors that might cause a packet to go off track – or get lost altogether.

Recipient’s ISP

Arrival

The final hop takes a packet to the recipient, which reassembles all of the packets into a coherent message. A separate message goes back through the network confirming successful delivery.