Photography

Cleaning up the damage and destruction at the U.S. Capitol

“We can now add Jan. 6, 2021, to that very short list of dates in American history that will live forever in infamy,” Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday night, hours after a riotous mob stormed the U.S. Capitol.

The evidence of that infamy was left for all to see inside the Capitol’s halls — broken glass, splintered wood, ransacked offices, a thin layer of fire-extinguisher residue coating the floors.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Scores of congressional personnel spent Wednesday night and Thursday morning working to restore the building to its usual splendor.

But some damage, physical and otherwise, will not be easily erased.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

A statue was defaced during the riot on Jan. 6 at the U.S. Capitol.

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Shattered windows and debris are seen Jan. 7, a day after rioters infiltrated the Capitol.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Junius Butler, normally a forklift operator for the Architect of the Capitol, helps clean up damage to the Capitol.

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Rioters breached the building and damaged statues and other areas.

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

Broken glass and litter left inside the Capitol by a pro-Trump mob.

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Workers clean up broken furniture at the Capitol on Jan. 7.

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

As rioters poured into the Capitol on Wednesday, it turned from a seat of government into a crime scene.

It became a place of deadly violence for the first time since 1998, when a gunman shot two Capitol Police officers.

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

On Wednesday, a police officer fatally shot 35-year-old Ashli Babbitt as she attempted to climb into the Speaker’s Lobby — an ornate corridor just behind the House chamber.

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

Broken windows at the entrance to the Speaker's Lobby off the House Floor.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Footprints are seen in the debris on the first floor of the Senate.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Richard Doerner, a museum specialist with the Senate Curator’s Office surveys damage done to the building.

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Litter left inside the Capitol left by rioters.

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Residue, likely from fire extinguishers discharged by rioters, on Senate office phones.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

A worker cleans the inside of the Capitol in the aftermath of the riot.

Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post

Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post

More damage inside the Capitol.

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Oliver Contreras for The Washington Post

Remnants of the riot at the West Front door.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Dried fire-extinguisher residue is seen on the floor of a corridor on the Senate side of the Capitol on Jan. 7.

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post

Rioters damaged doors and windows to gain entry to the Capitol.

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Workers clean the inside of the Capitol building.

Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post

Astrid Riecken for The Washington Post

A flag left behind by the pro-Trump mob in the Capitol.

Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

Olivier Douliery/AFP/Getty Images

Plastic covers a statue defaced during the riot.

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

A window was opened to bring in fresh air to the Capitol.

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

Bonnie Jo Mount/The Washington Post

Broken furniture on the first floor of the House.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

A “Don’t Tread On Me” flag is seen in a trash can at the Capitol.

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

Katherine Frey/The Washington Post

A Capitol Police officer is seen through a broken window on Jan. 7.

Matt McClain/The Washington Post

Matt McClain/The Washington Post

A Capitol Police officer on Jan. 7 passes damage and remnants from the infiltration of the Capitol.

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Yfrain Figueroa, right, and Raymond Andrew clean up damage.

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Amanda Andrade-Rhoades for The Washington Post

Garbage left on the East Front steps.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Workers pick up debris outside the Capitol.

Matt McClain/The Washington Post

Matt McClain/The Washington Post