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Three nights of anti-lockdown violence in the Netherlands

More than 180 people were arrested on Monday in the Netherlands amid a third night of anti-government riots in response to a new curfew.

Dutch officials said Tuesday that they would not reverse the measure, which requires residents to be at home between 9 p.m. and 4.30 a.m., in an effort to stem rising coronavirus case numbers.

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“You don’t capitulate to people who smash shop windows,” Wopke Hoekstra, the country’s finance minister, said on Tuesday, adding that he did not consider the rioters to be legitimate protesters.

“Scum does this,” Hoekstra said, according to Dutch news agency ANP.

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An anti-lockdown protest in Amsterdam on Jan. 21.

Robin van Lonkhuijsen/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

Robin van Lonkhuijsen/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

A torched coronavirus testing facility in the Dutch village of Urk on Jan. 24.

Peter Dejong/AP

Peter Dejong/AP

Police in Amsterdam on Jan. 24.

Eva Plevier/Reuters

Eva Plevier/Reuters

The scene in Eindhoven on Jan. 24.

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Police in Eindhoven on Jan. 24.

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Riots first erupted across the Netherlands on Saturday evening after authorities announced new measures — including the strictest curfew in the Netherlands since World War II.

The nighttime restrictions added to a number of rules already in place in the country, where bars and restaurants have been closed since October, and schools and shops since December.

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

The government had recorded about 954,000 coronavirus infections and more than 13,500 deaths as of Tuesday.

Across the country, police officers came under attack and looters targeted stores, according to reports. Broadcaster NOS reported that 21 locations across the country had seen clashes over the past three days.

Rob Engelaar/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Firefighters extinguish a blaze in Rotterdam on Jan. 25.

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

An officer holds a baton and a shield in Rotterdam on Jan. 25.

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

A man is detained in Rotterdam on Jan. 25.

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Mannequins lie on a street in Rotterdam on Jan. 25.

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

People peer out from windows in Nijmegen on Jan. 25.

Sanne Derks/Getty Images

Sanne Derks/Getty Images

Justice Minister Ferd Grapperhaus said Tuesday that rioters would face significant legal action beyond a standard $115 fine for flouting coronavirus rules.

So far, the government has said it will not call in the army to quell the disorder. “The police are equipped for this,” Hoekstra said.

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In a video message released Monday, Rotterdam Mayor Ahmed Aboutaleb appealed for calm.

“Does it feel good that you have destroyed the city?” he said.

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Rotterdam on Jan. 26.

Koen van Weel/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Koen van Weel/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

A damaged tram station in Rotterdam on Jan 26.

Koen van Weel/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

Koen van Weel/ANP/AFP/Getty Images

A shop in Rotterdam on Jan. 26.

Koen van Weel/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Koen van Weel/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Workers board up a damaged supermarket in Rotterdam on Jan. 25.

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock

Marco De Swart/EPA-EFE/Shutterstock