Trash the unpopular enemy or praise the controversial leader? This slight tweak in a speech’s framing implies a very different situation. The former may indicate a party not ready to accept its nominee wholeheartedly, looking elsewhere for unification. The latter, a coalition ready to go all-in for its nominee.

[ A mighty challenge awaits Trump on Thursday night]

Most speeches given at the Republican National Convention have offered a bit of both Donald Trump love and Hillary Clinton hate. But the transcripts show the convention’s tone has shifted between emphasizing Clinton’s shortcomings and upping Trump’s qualifications, with the final night of speeches leaning heavily in the pro-Trump direction.

Below is an approximation of which framing each speaker emphasized, based on how frequently he or she mentioned Trump or Clinton’s name.

SPEECHES WITH MORE MENTIONS OF TRUMP

With major speeches focused on Clinton and Benghazi, many others praised Trump.

Before Trump accepted

the nomination, speakers lauded his management style and personality.

Thur.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Trump’s former rivals gave primarily anti-Clinton-

focused speeches.

Several lawmakers made the case against Clinton.

Speeches with MORE MENTIONS OF CLINTON

Speeches with MORE MENTIONS OF TRUMP

With major speeches focused on Clinton and Benghazi, many others praised Trump.

Before Trump accepted

the nomination, speakers lauded his management style and personality.

Thursday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Trump’s former rivals gave primarily anti-Clinton-

focused speeches.

Several lawmakers made the case against Clinton.

SPEECHES WITH MORE MENTIONS OF CLINTON

SPEECHES WITH MORE MENTIONS OF TRUMP

With major speeches focused on Clinton and Benghazi, many others praised Trump.

Before Trump accepted

the nomination, speakers lauded his management style and personality.

Thur.

Mon.

Tues.

Wed.

Trump’s former rivals gave primarily anti-Clinton-

focused speeches.

Several lawmakers made the case against Clinton.

Speeches with MORE MENTIONS OF CLINTON

Speeches ranged from resoundingly anti-Clinton — see Chris Christie’s thundering indictment of the former secretary of state’s record — to heaping praise on Trump, such as those given by Trump’s children and business partners.

Trump’s former primary rivals tended toward speeches against Clinton, and they mentioned Trump little in comparison. On Wednesday, Sen. Ted Cruz (Tex.) congratulated Trump on his victory in the primary, but left the stage amid a chorus of boos after he refused to deliver an endorsement.

[ Attempt for unity falls short as Cruz upstages Pence]

House speaker Paul D. Ryan (R-Wis.), who has criticized Trump in the past, mentioned the nominee only twice in his speech. Instead he spoke in broad terms about conservative ideas, saying “progressives deliver everything except progress.”

Trump business partner Tom Barrack laid out his thinking on this divide. “I have nothing negative thing to say about Hillary,” he said. “I have only amazing things to tell you about Donald.”

The chart below shows how each of the speakers struck that balance in their own speeches.

More mentions

of Clinton

More mentions

of Trump

Monday

Willie Robertson

Scott Baio

Smith, Geist and Tiegen, who all have personal connections to the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, spoke vehemently against Clinton.

Rick Perry

Marcus Luttrell

Patricia Smith

Mark Geist/John Tiegen

Antonio Sabato Jr.

Mary Ann Mendoza

Sabine Durden

Jamiel Shaw

Rep. Michael McCaul

David Clarke

Rep. Sean P. Duffy

Rachel Campos-Duffy

Darryl Glenn

Sen. Tom Cotton

Karen Vaughn

Sen. Jeff Sessions

Flynn praised Trump’s leadership and ended his speech by encouraging the audience to chant the nominee’s name.

Rudy Giuliani

Melania Trump

Michael Flynn

Sen. Joni Ernst

Jason Beardsley

Rep. Ryan Zinke

Tuesday

Sharon Day

Dana White

Gov. Asa Hutchinson

Leslie Rutledge

Republican party leaders Mitch McConnell and

Paul Ryan largely avoided saying Trump’s name, instead taking issue with Clinton.

Michael Mukasey

Andy Wist

Sen. Ron Johnson

Chris Cox

Natalie Gulbis

Sen. Mitch McConnell

Rep. Paul D. Ryan

Kevin McCarthy

Gov. Chris Christie

Tiffany Trump

Kerry Woolard

Donald Trump Jr.

Shelley Moore Capito

Ben Carson

Kimberlin Brown

Wednesday

Rick Scott

Four former candidates for this cycle’s Republican nomination chose to emphasize Clinton’s shortcomings.

Laura Ingraham

Phil Ruffin

Pam Bondi

Eileen Collins

Michelle Van Etten

Ralph Alvarado Jr.

Darrell Scott

Harold Hamm

Gov. Scott Walker

Lynne Patton

Sen. Marco Rubio

Sen. Ted Cruz

Eric Trump

Ted Cruz did not endorse Trump, instead telling his audience to “vote your conscience.”

Callista Gingrich

Newt Gingrich

Gov. Mike Pence

Thursday

Tony Perkins

Jerry Falwell, Jr.

Joseph Arpaio

Mark Burns

Fran Tarkenton

Brock Mealer

Rep. Marsha Blackburn

Thursday’s tone was almost entirely pro-Trump. Only RNC chair Reince Priebus mentioned Clinton more than his party’s nominee.

Gov. Mary Fallin

Lisa Shin

Reince Priebus

Peter Thiel

Tom Barrack

Ivanka Trump

More mentions of Clinton

More mentions of Trump

Monday

Willie Robertson

Smith, Geist and Tiegen, who all have personal connections to the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, spoke vehemently against Clinton.

Scott Baio

Rick Perry

Marcus Luttrell

Patricia Smith

Mark Geist/John Tiegen

Antonio Sabato Jr.

Mary Ann Mendoza

Sabine Durden

Jamiel Shaw

Rep. Michael McCaul

David Clarke

Rep. Sean P. Duffy

Rachel Campos-Duffy

Darryl Glenn

Flynn praised Trump’s leadership and ended his speech by encouraging the audience to chant the nominee’s name.

Sen. Tom Cotton

Karen Vaughn

Sen. Jeff Sessions

Rudy Giuliani

Melania Trump

Michael Flynn

Sen. Joni Ernst

Jason Beardsley

Rep. Ryan Zinke

Tuesday

Sharon Day

Dana White

Gov. Asa Hutchinson

Leslie Rutledge

Michael Mukasey

Republican party leaders Mitch McConnell and

Paul Ryan largely avoided saying Trump’s name, instead taking issue

with Clinton.

Andy Wist

Sen. Ron Johnson

Chris Cox

Natalie Gulbis

Sen. Mitch McConnell

Rep. Paul D. Ryan

Rep. Kevin McCarthy

Gov. Chris Christie

Tiffany Trump

Kerry Woolard

Donald Trump Jr.

Shelley Moore Capito

Ben Carson

Kimberlin Brown

Wednesday

Rick Scott

Laura Ingraham

Phil Ruffin

Four former candidates for this cycle’s Republican nomination chose to emphasize Clinton’s shortcomings.

Pam Bondi

Eileen Collins

Michelle Van Etten

Ralph Alvarado Jr.

Darrell Scott

Harold Hamm

Gov. Scott Walker

Lynne Patton

Sen. Marco Rubio

Sen. Ted Cruz

Eric Trump

Ted Cruz did not endorse Trump, instead telling his audience to “vote your conscience.”

Callista Gingrich

Newt Gingrich

Gov. Mike Pence

Thursday

Tony Perkins

Jerry Falwell, Jr.

Joseph Arpaio

Mark Burns

Fran Tarkenton

Brock Mealer

Thursday’s tone was almost entirely pro-Trump. Only RNC chair Reince Priebus mentioned Clinton more than his party’s nominee.

Rep. Marsha Blackburn

Gov. Mary Fallin

Lisa Shin

Reince Priebus

Peter Thiel

Tom Barrack

Ivanka Trump

More mentions

of Clinton

More mentions

of Trump

Monday

Willie Robertson

Scott Baio

Smith, Geist and Tiegen, who all have personal connections to the attacks in Benghazi, Libya, spoke vehemently against Clinton.

Rick Perry

Marcus Luttrell

Patricia Smith

Mark Geist/John Tiegen

Antonio Sabato Jr.

Mary Ann Mendoza

Sabine Durden

Jamiel Shaw

Rep. Michael McCaul

David Clarke

Rep. Sean P. Duffy

Rachel Campos-Duffy

Darryl Glenn

Sen. Tom Cotton

Karen Vaughn

Sen. Jeff Sessions

Flynn praised Trump’s leadership and ended his speech by encouraging the audience to chant the nominee’s name.

Rudy Giuliani

Melania Trump

Michael Flynn

Sen. Joni Ernst

Jason Beardsley

Rep. Ryan Zinke

Tuesday

Sharon Day

Dana White

Gov. Asa Hutchinson

Leslie Rutledge

Michael Mukasey

Andy Wist

Republican party leaders Mitch McConnell and

Paul Ryan largely avoided saying Trump’s name, instead taking issue with Clinton.

Sen. Ron Johnson

Chris Cox

Natalie Gulbis

Sen. Mitch McConnell

Rep. Paul D. Ryan

Rep. Kevin McCarthy

Gov. Chris Christie

Tiffany Trump

Kerry Woolard

Donald Trump Jr.

Shelley Moore Capito

Ben Carson

Kimberlin Brown

Wednesday

Rick Scott

Laura Ingraham

Four former candidates for this cycle’s Republican nomination chose to emphasize Clinton’s shortcomings.

Phil Ruffin

Pam Bondi

Eileen Collins

Michelle Van Etten

Ralph Alvarado Jr.

Darrell Scott

Harold Hamm

Gov. Scott Walker

Lynne Patton

Sen. Marco Rubio

Sen. Ted Cruz

Eric Trump

Ted Cruz did not endorse Trump, instead telling his audience to “vote your conscience.”

Callista Gingrich

Newt Gingrich

Gov. Mike Pence

Thursday

Tony Perkins

Jerry Falwell, Jr.

Joseph Arpaio

Mark Burns

Fran Tarkenton

Brock Mealer

Rep. Marsha Blackburn

Thursday’s tone was almost entirely pro-Trump. Only RNC chair Reince Priebus mentioned Clinton more than his party’s nominee.

Gov. Mary Fallin

Lisa Shin

Reince Priebus

Peter Thiel

Tom Barrack

Ivanka Trump

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