How the country swung to the right

Vast swaths of the nation voted more Republican than in 2012, with Trump flipping a large number of counties.

Each county is a line

Swing is change in

margin from 2012

Color is winner

CLINTON

TRUMP

Thick stroke means

county flipped

from 2012

Data as of 7 a.m. Eastern

Swing is change in

margin from 2012

Each county is a line

Color is winner

CLINTON

TRUMP

Thick stroke means

county flipped from 2012

Data as of 7 a.m. Eastern

EAST

COAST

THE NORTHEAST

PENNSYLVANIA AND NORTH CAROLINA

Those bold red swings stretching from inland Maine through New Hampshire and into upstate New York are counties that flipped in Trump’s favor from 2012. Away from the large cities on the coast, these counties resemble the pattern seen widely, where cities voted slightly more Democratic, but suburbs and beyond swung way to the right.

Pennsylvania had voted for six Democratic presidential candidates in a row, but this year, most counties in the state voted more Republican than in 2012. North Carolina, on the other hand, was a reliably red state until Obama won it in 2008. Democrats hoped they could capture it this time around, but Trump won by four percentage points.

Maine

Rural counties

swinging to the

Republicans

R.I.

N.H.

Mass.

Vt.

Conn.

N.J.

N.Y.

Del.

Md.

THE GREAT LAKES

The Midwest is where Trump redrew the electoral map. States like Michigan and Wisconsin were considered favorable to Clinton, but instead swung to Trump mostly due to voters in mid-sized counties outside the major cities. The most striking change occurred in counties along the junction of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. In this farm country, Trump’s message to people left behind helped him seize a significant advantage.

Pa.

Va.

N.C.

W.Va.

S.C.

Fla.

Atlanta area

Ga.

Ohio

Ky.

Mich.

THE DEEP SOUTH

Ind.

Voters across Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia predictably voted Republican, but in no dramatic fashion. Rapidly urbanizing counties around Atlanta swung hard to the left for Clinton. She flipped three counties in this area that Obama lost in 2012.

Ala.

Tenn.

Ill.

Wis.

Miss.

Huge swing

to the right in

these areas

Mo.

Ark.

La.

Iowa

Minn.

Okla.

Kan.

Tex.

N.D.

S.D.

Neb.

N.M.

Colo.

ALONG THE BORDER

People closest to where Trump said he would build a wall consistently voted against him, all the way from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean.

Wyo.

Mont.

Ariz.

Utah

UTAH

Idaho

The reason you’re seeing counties in Utah swinging has a simple answer: Evan McMullin. The three-way contest with the independent conservative candidate in this state reduced the Republican margin, even though Clinton wasn’t competitive.

Nev.

Orange County

Calif.

Wash.

THE WEST

Ore.

Even though early voting suggested a historic Hispanic turnout in Nevada, Clinton won the two largest counties in the state by a slightly slimmer margin than Obama did in 2012. California became even more Democratic: Clinton won Orange County, which hasn’t gone for a Democrat since Franklin Roosevelt. In the Pacific Northwest, a pocket of rural counties between Seattle and Portland swung toward Trump.

WEST

COAST

EAST

COAST

THE NORTHEAST

PENNSYLVANIA AND NORTH CAROLINA

Those bold red swings stretching from inland Maine through New Hampshire and into upstate New York are counties that flipped in Trump’s favor from 2012. Away from the large cities on the coast, these counties resemble the pattern seen widely, where cities voted slightly more Democratic, but suburbs and beyond swung way to the right.

Pennsylvania had voted for six Democratic presidential candidates in a row, but this year, most counties in the state voted more Republican than in 2012. North Carolina, on the other hand, was a reliably red state until Obama won it in 2008. Democrats hoped they could capture it this time around, but Trump won by four percentage points.

Maine

Rural counties

swinging to the

Republicans

R.I.

N.H.

Mass.

Vt.

Conn.

N.J.

N.Y.

Del.

Md.

THE GREAT LAKES

The Midwest is where Trump redrew the electoral map. States like Michigan and Wisconsin were considered favorable to Clinton, but instead swung to Trump mostly due to voters in mid-sized counties outside the major cities. The most striking change occurred in counties along the junction of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. In this farm country, Trump’s message to people left behind helped him seize a significant advantage.

Pa.

Va.

N.C.

W.Va.

S.C.

Fla.

Atlanta area

Ga.

Ohio

Ky.

THE DEEP SOUTH

Mich.

Voters across Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia predictably voted Republican, but in no dramatic fashion. Rapidly urbanizing counties around Atlanta swung hard to the left for Clinton. She flipped three counties in this area that Obama lost in 2012.

Ind.

Ala.

Tenn.

Ill.

Wis.

Miss.

Huge swing

to the right in

these areas

Mo.

Ark.

La.

Iowa

Minn.

Okla.

Kan.

Tex.

N.D.

S.D.

Neb.

ALONG THE BORDER

People closest to where Trump said he would build a wall consistently voted against him, all the way from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean.

N.M.

Colo.

Wyo.

Mont.

UTAH

Ariz.

The reason you’re seeing counties in Utah swinging has a simple answer: Evan McMullin. The three-way contest with the independent conservative candidate in this state reduced the Republican margin, even though Clinton wasn’t competitive.

Utah

Idaho

Nev.

Orange County

THE WEST

Calif.

Even though early voting suggested a historic Hispanic turnout in Nevada, Clinton won the two largest counties in the state by a slightly slimmer margin than Obama did in 2012. California became even more Democratic: Clinton won Orange County, which hasn’t gone for a Democrat since Franklin Roosevelt. In the Pacific Northwest, a pocket of rural counties between Seattle and Portland swung toward Trump.

Wash.

Ore.

WEST

COAST

THE NORTHEAST

Those bold red swings stretching from inland Maine through New Hampshire and into upstate New York are counties that flipped in Trump’s favor from 2012. Away from the large cities on the coast, these counties resemble the pattern seen widely, where cities voted slightly more Democratic, but suburbs and beyond swung way to the right.

PENNSYLVANIA AND NORTH CAROLINA

Pennsylvania had voted for six Democratic presidential candidates in a row, but this year, most counties in the state voted more Republican than in 2012. North Carolina, on the other hand, was a reliably red state until Obama won it in 2008. Democrats hoped they could capture it this time around, but Trump won by four percentage points.

THE GREAT LAKES

The Midwest is where Trump redrew the electoral map. States like Michigan and Wisconsin were considered favorable to Clinton, but instead swung to Trump mostly due to voters in mid-sized counties outside the major cities. The most striking change occurred in counties along the junction of Illinois, Wisconsin and Iowa. In this farm country, Trump’s message to people left behind helped him seize a significant advantage.

THE DEEP SOUTH

Voters across Alabama, Mississippi and Georgia predictably voted Republican, but in no dramatic fashion. Rapidly urbanizing counties around Atlanta swung hard to the left for Clinton. She flipped three counties in this area that Obama lost in 2012.

ALONG THE BORDER

People closest to where Trump said he would build a wall consistently voted against him, all the way from the Gulf of Mexico to the Pacific Ocean.

THE WEST

Even though early voting suggested a historic Hispanic turnout in Nevada, Clinton won the two largest counties in the state by a slightly slimmer margin than Obama did in 2012. California became even more Democratic: Clinton won Orange County, which hasn’t gone for a Democrat since Franklin Roosevelt. In the Pacific Northwest, a pocket of rural counties between Seattle and Portland swung toward Trump.

The peaks and valleys of Trump and Clinton’s support

Clinton won in urban counties, while Trump won everywhere else.

Each county

is a triangle

Height

is total

votes cast

Width is margin

in net votes

Color is winner

Thick stroke is

county won

in a landslide

(50%+)

CLINTON

TRUMP

Data as of 7 a.m. Eastern

Each county is a triangle

Height

is total

votes cast

Color is winner

CLINTON

TRUMP

Thick stroke is county won

in a landslide (50%+)

Width is margin

in net votes

Data as of 7 a.m. Eastern

EAST

COAST

THE NORTHEAST

THE URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

To no one’s surprise, Clinton won decisively in the Northeast Corridor. Those cities provided huge margins for her from Boston to Washington. Trump’s most notable big-city win was in Suffolk County on Long Island. While Trump didn’t win in the most urban counties, he held a significant edge in suburban counties.

Nationwide, Clinton won the urban core overwhelmingly, but Trump won 75 percent or more of everything else from suburbs to rural counties.

Maine

R.I.

Conn.

N.H.

Vt.

Mass.

THE GREAT LAKES

N.Y.

Clinton’s large wins in Midwestern cities like Cleveland and Detroit weren’t enough to offset the Trump margins from many more smaller cities and counties. For example, Clinton won seven of Ohio’s 88 counties. She lost the area around Dayton, a medium-sized city that voted for Obama in 2012.

Del.

Pa.

Md.

Raleigh

South Florida

Va.

N.C.

Charlotte

Orlando

W.Va.

Fla.

Detroit

S.C.

Tampa

Ohio

Ga.

Atlanta

FLORIDA

Mich.

Clinton held her own in Democratic strongholds in South Florida and Orlando, but Trump flipped St. Petersburg by a slim margin. Trump pulled away with large wins up and down both coasts in areas growing with retirees.

Ind.

Ky.

Chicago

Milwaukee

Tenn.

Ala.

Ill.

Miss.

Wis.

La.

Twin Cities

Ark.

Minn.

Mo.

Houston

Iowa

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Kan.

Okla.

Tex.

N.D.

Neb.

S.D.

Denver

N.M.

Colo.

TEXAS AND THE PLAINS

Compared to Trump’s wins in the South, his margins in rural counties in the Great Plains were much higher, consistently winning by more than 50 percentage points. These counties are tiny, but combined, they handed him easy wins through the region.

Wyo.

Mont.

Ariz.

Utah

THE SOUTHWEST

Maricopa County bucks the trend of urban areas voting for Democrats. Like Romney in 2012, Trump narrowly carried the county, netting him by far his largest single county win. The county includes the urban voters in Phoenix but even more conservative suburban voters.

Idaho

Nev.

Los Angeles

Calif.

Wash.

Seattle

Portland

WEST

COAST

Ore.

Bay Area

EAST

COAST

THE NORTHEAST

THE URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

To no one’s surprise, Clinton won decisively in the Northeast Corridor. Those cities provided huge margins for her from Boston to Washington. Trump’s most notable big-city win was in Suffolk County on Long Island. While Trump didn’t win in the most urban counties, he held a significant edge in suburban counties.

Nationwide, Clinton won the urban core overwhelmingly, but Trump won 75 percent or more of everything else from suburbs to rural counties.

Maine

Boston

R.I.

N.H.

Mass.

Vt.

Conn.

New York City

Philadelphia

N.J.

N.Y.

THE GREAT LAKES

Del.

Clinton’s large wins in Midwestern cities like Cleveland and Detroit weren’t enough to offset the Trump margins from many more smaller cities and counties. For example, Clinton won seven of Ohio’s 88 counties. She lost the area around Dayton, a medium-sized city that voted for Obama in 2012.

Md.

Rochester

Pa.

Raleigh

Buffalo

Va.

South Florida

N.C.

Charlotte

Orlando

Cleveland

W.Va.

S.C.

Detroit

Fla.

Columbus

Tampa

Ga.

Ohio

Flint

Atlanta

Cincinnati

FLORIDA

Ky.

Clinton held her own in Democratic strongholds in South Florida and Orlando, but Trump flipped St. Petersburg by a slim margin. Trump pulled away with large wins up and down both coasts in areas growing with retirees.

Mich.

Indianapolis

Louisville

Grand Rapids

Chicago

Ind.

Nashville

Ala.

Milwaukee

Tenn.

Madison

Ill.

Memphis

St. Louis

New Orleans

Wis.

Miss.

Twin Cities

Little Rock

Mo.

Ark.

La.

Des Moines

Iowa

Kansas City

Minn.

Houston

Tulsa

Dallas-Ft. Worth

Omaha

Okla.

Lincoln

Oklahoma City

Wichita

Austin

Kan.

San Antonio

Tex.

N.D.

S.D.

Neb.

TEXAS AND THE PLAINS

Compared to Trump’s wins in the South, his margins in rural counties in the Great Plains were much higher, consistently winning by more than 50 percentage points. These counties are tiny, but combined, they handed him easy wins through the region.

Colorado

Springs

Denver

N.M.

Colo.

El Paso

Albuquerque

Wyo.

Mont.

Phoenix

THE SOUTHWEST

Tucson

Salt Lake City

Maricopa County bucks the trend of urban areas voting for Democrats. Like Romney in 2012, Trump narrowly carried the county, netting him by far his largest single county win. The county includes the urban voters in Phoenix but even more conservative suburban voters.

Ariz.

Utah

Missoula

Las Vegas

Idaho

Boise

San Diego

Nev.

Los Angeles

Spokane

Calif.

Reno

Wash.

Seattle

Sacramento

Portland

Ore.

WEST

COAST

Bay Area

THE NORTHEAST

To no one’s surprise, Clinton won decisively in the Northeast Corridor. Those cities provided huge margins for her from Boston to Washington. Trump’s most notable big-city win was in Suffolk County on Long Island. While Trump didn’t win in the most urban counties, he held a significant edge in suburban counties.

THE URBAN-RURAL DIVIDE

Nationwide, Clinton won the urban core overwhelmingly, but Trump won 75 percent or more of everything else from suburbs to rural counties.

THE GREAT LAKES

Clinton’s large wins in Midwestern cities like Cleveland and Detroit weren’t enough to offset the Trump margins from many more smaller cities and counties. For example, Clinton won seven of Ohio’s 88 counties. She lost the area around Dayton, a medium-sized city that voted for Obama in 2012.

FLORIDA

Clinton held her own in Democratic strongholds in South Florida and Orlando, but Trump flipped St. Petersburg by a slim margin. Trump pulled away with large wins up and down both coasts in areas growing with retirees.

TEXAS AND THE PLAINS

Compared to Trump’s wins in the South, his margins in rural counties in the Great Plains were much higher, consistently winning by more than 50 percentage points. These counties are tiny, but combined, they handed him easy wins through the region.

Geography proves to be a crucial determining factor of how people vote. The urban classification of the counties reveals the parties' startling extremes.

Percent lead in

counties won

Number of

counties

Urban cores

68

+72.5%

Suburbs

367

+49.3%

368

Medium-sized city

+49%

356

+70.2%

Small city

637

+73.3%

Very small city

1,299

+84.6%

Rural

Percent lead in

counties won

Number of

counties

50%

Urban cores

68

+72.5%

Suburbs

367

+49.3%

368

+49%

Medium-sized city

356

+70.2%

Small city

637

+73.3%

Very small city

+84.6%

1,299

Rural

Clinton won almost 90 percent of urban cores, while Trump won the vast majority – between 75 and 90 percent – of suburbs, small cities and rural areas. Though these latter geographies are more sparsely populated, they were home to the majority of voters this election.

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