TOTAL DELEGATES

1,237 to win

DONALD

TRUMP

EVERYONE

ELSE

678

delegates

735

delegates

Delegate totals as of March 18

TOTAL DELEGATES

1,237 to win

DONALD TRUMP

EVERYONE ELSE

678 delegates

735 delegates

Delegate totals as of March 18

Following a strong showing in the first half of March, Donald Trump is the far-and-away favorite to win the Republican nomination.

At this point, the best hope for those remaining in the field, Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, is to win enough delegates to prevent Trump from clinching the nomination, and force a contested convention. That scenario hinges on whether Trump, or the other candidates together, can reach the needed 1,237 delegates.

[Wild card for Trump: Who gets to be a convention delegate?]

After primaries and caucuses in 29 states and some territories, the rest of the field is just ahead of Trump in delegates. But Trump is well positioned to win large pools of delegates in the second half of the primary calendar.

Going into the convention in July, Trump will be the Republican nominee (most likely) or no one will be. If it’s the latter, delegates will probably take part in multiple rounds of voting to select a nominee. Here’s a look at the delegate battlegrounds so far and the road ahead.

[Republicans adjusted rules for their primaries after 2012, and it’s helping Trump]

The remaining delegates

The first half of the primary calendar was a mixed bag for the anti-Trump effort. Trump won most contests but showed some weaknesses in the West and Midwest, where Cruz, Kasich and Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.), who has since dropped out of the race, picked up some victories. Ultimately, the field was unable to stop Trump’s momentum. That could spell trouble going forward, since states are no longer required to allocate their delegates proportionally. This rule could help Trump win the nomination, perhaps just before the very end of the primary season on June 7.

909 remaining delegates

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

Note: 91 unbound delegates in upcoming contests are not included.

MARCH

APRIL

MAY

JUNE

5

19

26

3

10

17

24

7

22

909 remaining delegates

Note: 91 unbound delegates in upcoming contests are not included.

The home states

The most important contests in the race against Trump were Rubio and Kasich’s home states: Florida and Ohio. Kasich was able to pull off a win in Ohio, but Rubio lost badly to Trump in Florida, leading him to suspend his campaign.

LOST

WON

Florida

Ohio

99 delegates

66 delegates

Winner-take-all

Winner-take-all

Rubio

Kasich

99 delegates

Florida

Winner-take-all

LOST

Rubio

66 delegates

Ohio

WON

Winner-take-all

Kasich

Six more winner-take-all states are still up for grabs.

[Rubio’s demise marks the last gasp of the Republican reboot]

The South

Almost every Southern state has voted, and all but two were wins for Trump. Cruz did not win some of the key states he needed to prevent Trump’s advance, but he was able to win his home state of Texas, as well as neighboring Oklahoma. The biggest remaining Southern contests are Maryland on April 26 and West Virginia on May 10.

MARYLAND

WEST VIRGINIA

38 delegates

34 delegates

Hybrid system

Hybrid system

The field’s best shot in these states.

Cruz

These states reward winners heavily at the statewide and congressional district levels.

The field’s best shot in these states.

38 delegates

Maryland

Hybrid system

34 delegates

WEST

VIRGINIA

Cruz

Hybrid system

These states reward winners heavily at the statewide and congressional district levels.

If Cruz is to win the nomination, or at least keep Trump from doing so, he must do well in contests that are far less favorable to his brand of conservatism.

[Cruz says he has a path to victory over Trump, but he needs help soon]

The Midwest

The Cruz campaign has targeted the April 5 primary in Wisconsin and its 42 delegates. But Kasich’s Midwestern appeal and Trump’s wins in nearby Illinois and Michigan, could spell trouble. Indiana, which votes May 3, has the most remaining delegates available in the Midwest. Cruz’s best chance to peel delegates from Trump here may be in South Dakota (May 10) and Nebraska (June 7), two winner-take-all states with 65 delegates between them.

WISCONSIN

INDIANA

42 delegates

57 delegates

Hybrid system

Hybrid system

SOUTH DAKOTA

NEBRASKA

29 delegates

36 delegates

Winner-take-all

Winner-take-all

Cruz

Kasich

42 delegates

WISCONSIN

Hybrid system

57 delegates

INDIANA

Hybrid system

Kasich

29 delegates

SOUTH DAKOTA

Winner-take-all

36 delegates

Cruz

NEBRASKA

Winner-take-all

The West

The West will host more of the remaining contests than any other region, with eight states left to vote there. Tuesday’s Arizona and Utah primaries are the next big test for the field. Trump is favored to win all of Arizona’s 58 delegates, but Utah’s caucuses appear to be in play for Cruz, who won the primary in neighboring Idaho. Cruz can win all of Utah’s 40 delegates if he can get more than 50 percent of the vote.

It may come down to the June 7 primaries, including the big Western prize, California. If Trump hasn’t locked up the nomination by then, the Golden State could be his ticket. It could also be an important final piece in the field’s effort to stop him, coupled with three winner-take-all contests the same day.

UTAH

MONTANA

27 delegates

40 delegates

Winner-take-all

Proportional

with trigger

NEW MEXICO

California

24 delegates

172 delegates

Proportional

Hybrid system

Cruz

40 delegates

UTAH

Proportional, with a

chance to be winner-take-all

27 delegates

MONTANA

Winner-take-all

24 delegates

NEW MEXICO

Proportional

Cruz

172 delegates

California

Hybrid system

[The Republican race may come down to California. Here’s how that would look.]

If the race remains close until the end, focus will shift to the more than 150 unbound delegates going to Cleveland in July. Some of these delegates will come from Pennsylvania, where 54 of the state’s 71 delegates are not committed to a certain candidate. Depending on their state’s rules, some of the delegates won by Rubio will also be free to support any of the remaining candidates, which means they could become a powerful group for Trump, Cruz or Kasich to persuade.

Related coverage

[Delegates: The race to the GOP nomination]

[Obama is increasingly involved in the 2016 presidential campaign]

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