}

Politics

Nevertheless she persisted: Elizabeth Warren ends campaign after drawing loyal female following

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Sen. Elizabeth Warren rose to national prominence as voice for consumers and families. She has a knack for understanding when her adversaries have gone too far — and famously turned a moment on the Senate floor where Republican Leader Mitch McConnell chastised her for doggedness into an early slogan. “Nevertheless, she persisted,” McConnell complained, a phrase that some women who attended Warren rallies had tattooed on their arms.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

On Thursday, Warren suspended her presidential campaign after a series of disappointing primary results weakened her once-promising campaign.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Warren sought to build a grass-roots movement and held hundreds of town-hall-style events across the country. In some places, thousands came to see her. A hallmark of her events was the “selfie line” where she would stay — for hours sometimes — to pose for a photo with every person who attended.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Warren built one of the largest and best-organized campaigns. She set herself apart from others by releasing a raft of policy papers, giving voters a detailed look at how she’d try to govern. The tactic had some shortfalls: She struggled for months to fully articulate her health-care plan. Despite the big crowds who came to see her, she was plagued by questions about whether she could beat President Trump.

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

On the campaign trail, Warren clearly delighted in meeting children. When she encountered little girls, she would lean down for a “pinkie promise,” telling them that she’s running for president because “that’s what girls do.”

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

“We didn’t reach our goal, but what we have done together — what you have done — has made a lasting difference,” Warren said in a phone call with her staff as she told them the campaign was ending. “It’s not the scale of the difference we wanted to make, but it matters — and the changes will have ripples for years to come.”

Melina Mara/The Washington Post

Melina Mara/The Washington Post