$580

million

Raised by Trump, his
committees and the RNC

$480

million

Raised by Democratic
candidates and the DNC

Who’s winning the 2020 money race?

President Trump’s reelection effort has had a big head start over his Democratic rivals. Unlike his predecessors, Trump began raising money toward his reelection shortly after he was elected. The result: a fundraising machine that already has amassed more than $580 million toward his reelection and strengthening the Republican Party.

He draws contributions from wealthy backers as well as small-dollar donors from his loyal base of supporters giving money online.

That raises the stakes for Democrats, who still have a long way to go before they consolidate their donor energy behind one nominee who can close the money gap with Trump. There are signs that enthusiasm is building for Democrats: In the second quarter, the Democratic field together with the Democratic National Committee exceeded the amount raised by Trump, the Republican National Committee and the affiliated committees raising money for both.

Click on a column to sort the table.

Raised in Q2 Total raised Share from small donations Cash on hand

Bernie Sanders

$26M

 

$46M

 

60%

$27M

Burn rate: 41%

Elizabeth Warren

$19M

 

$36M

 

48%

$20M

Burn rate: 44%

Pete Buttigieg

$25M

 

$32M

 

49%

$23M

Burn rate: 29%

John Delaney

$8M

$7.8M in loans to own campaign

$26M

$24M in loans to own campaign

1%

$7M

Burn rate: 72%

Kamala Harris

$12M

 

$25M

 

39%

$13M

Burn rate: 47%

Joe Biden

$22M

 

$22M

 

38%

$11M

Burn rate: 48%

Kirsten Gillibrand

$2M

 

$15M

 

9%

$8M

Burn rate: 45%

Beto O'Rourke

$4M

 

$13M

 

55%

$5M

Burn rate: 59%

Amy Klobuchar

$4M

 

$13M

 

25%

$7M

Burn rate: 47%

Cory Booker

$5M

 

$12M

 

16%

$5M

Burn rate: 56%

Tulsi Gabbard

$2M

 

$6M

 

36%

$2M

Burn rate: 60%

Jay Inslee

$3M

 

$5M

 

45%

$1M

Burn rate: 77%

Andrew Yang

$3M

 

$5M

 

66%

$848k

Burn rate: 83%

Julián Castro

$3M

 

$4M

 

60%

$1M

Burn rate: 72%

Michael Bennet

$4M

 

$4M

 

19%

$2M

Burn rate: 37%

John Hickenlooper

$1M

 

$3M

 

15%

$836k

Burn rate: 74%

Marianne Williamson

$2M

 

$3M

 

65%

$548k

Burn rate: 81%

Steve Bullock

$2M

 

$2M

 

22%

$1M

Burn rate: 28%

Seth Moulton

$2M

 

$2M

 

15%

$724k

Burn rate: 63%

Bill de Blasio

$1M

 

$1M

 

9%

$729k

Burn rate: 33%

Tim Ryan

$889k

 

$889k

 

29%

$335k

Burn rate: 61%

Wayne Messam

$16k

 

$94k

 

30%

$31k

Burn rate: 67%

The second-quarter fundraising figures reported by the sprawling Democratic field of around two dozen candidates show us how the field is shaping up.

A handful of candidates are drawing the most attention among donors and potential primary voters. The candidates who raised the least amount spent most — if not all — of the money they raised in the second quarter, which doesn't bode well for their ability to survive the lengthy primary fight. These candidates entered the notoriously difficult fundraising months of July and August with limited funds, which means they will need to be more strategic and frugal in the coming months.

Raised in Q2 Total raised Share from small donations Cash on hand

Republican National Committee

$29M

$346M

47%

$37M

Trump fundraising committees

$59M

$190M

10%

$24M

Donald Trump

$9M

$47M

9%

$57M

Note: RNC data as of May 31.

Trump's haul is buoyed by his advantage as the incumbent backed by the national party committee. This means he can raise much larger amounts of money from wealthy donors to his campaign and the RNC.

Trump has also proved to be a successful small-dollar fundraiser. He constantly taps his online supporters through emails, texts and digital advertisements to give a few dollars at a time or to purchase Make America Great Again merchandise to show support for his presidency and his reelection.

$97

million

Raised by
Trump, his committees
and the RNC in Q2 up to May 31

$160

million

Raised by
Democratic candidates
and the DNC in Q2 up to May 31

On the Democratic side, donors largely sat on the sidelines waiting for the field to take shape.

As the DNC works to rebuild donors’ trust after an organizational reset following the 2016 election, party officials say they are rebuilding their fundraising capabilities so that they can pass on a stronger national party for the nominee in 2020 than they did in the last presidential election.

Anu Narayanswamy

Anu Narayanswamy is the data reporter for the national political enterprise and accountability team at The Washington Post, with a focus on money and politics.

Kevin Schaul

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

Brittany Renee Mayes

Brittany Renee Mayes joined The Washington Post as a general assignment graphics reporter in June 2018. She previously worked at NPR on the visuals team as a news applications developer.

About this story

Source: Federal Election Commission. The graphic does not include fundraising numbers for former congressman Joe Sestak, who began his campaign too close to the July 1 filing deadline. It also does not include Tom Steyer, who started his campaign after the deadline. Small donations refer to contributions of $200 or less.

Originally published April 16, 2019.

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