foreign policy

Do you support a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict?

Yes

Yes

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet “believes any steps taken by the United States must improve security in the region and preserve a pathway to direct talks between the Israelis and the Palestinians with the longstanding, bipartisan goal of two states living side by side in peace and security,” a campaign spokesperson told The Post.

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Michael Bennet
Bennet

Joe Biden

Former vice president

“Yes. A two-state solution is the only path to long-term security for Israel, while sustaining its identity as a Jewish and democratic state,” Biden told The Post. “It is also the only way to ensure Palestinian dignity and Palestinians’ legitimate interest in national self-determination. And it is a necessary condition to take full advantage of the opening that exists for greater cooperation between Israel and its Arab neighbors.”

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Joe Biden
Biden

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

“I am committed to finding a two-state solution so that Palestinians and Israelis have the dignity and security they deserve,” Booker told The Post.

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Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“Israel is an American ally. That relationship is stronger than one president or one prime minister,” Bullock told The Post. “Our military and economic relationship is important to maintain — and we will continue to strengthen the trade relationship with Israel. Above all, we will continue to seek a peace process that guarantees Israel’s security and creates a two-state solution in the region that allows Israel and the Palestinian people to live side by side.”

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Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

“Yes. The U.S. alliance with Israel and support for Israel’s security are fundamental tenets of U.S. national security policy, and will remain so if I am elected,” Buttigieg told The Post. “But this is not a zero-sum game. Israeli security and Palestinian aspirations are fundamentally interlinked. To visit the West Bank (as I did) and Gaza is to understand the fundamental need for a two-state solution which addresses the economic, security and moral rights of Palestinians who live there and Israeli citizens.”

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Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Apr. 8: “In abandoning our position as a good faith partner in the Middle East peace process, the Trump admin has enabled reckless actions like this from Netanyahu. US support for a two-state solution is on the line in November 2020. ”

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Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

“I do support a two-state solution but do not think it should be the position of the U.S. to predetermine what that agreement looks like,” Delaney told the Council on Foreign Relations. “The only way that lasting peace can be achieved in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict is if there are direct, bilateral negotiations between the two parties.”

Mar. 25: “I support a two-state solution and our alliance, and that is exactly what AIPAC has been fighting for, on a bipartisan basis, for decades.”

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John Delaney
Delaney

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

“Yes. I support peace negotiations that will result in self-determination, security and peace for the Israeli and Palestinian people alike,” Gabbard told The Post.

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Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris will “continue her unshakable support for Israel and work towards a two-state solution so that Palestinians and Israelis can govern themselves in security, dignity, and peace,” Harris's campaign website said.

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Kamala Harris
Harris

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar supports a two-state solution, her campaign told The Post.

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Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke supports a two-state solution, a campaign spokesperson told The Post. “A two-state solution that realizes the aspirations of the Palestinian people and addresses Israel’s legitimate security concerns is the only way to guarantee peace and the human rights and dignity of both Israelis and Palestinians,” he told the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

“Yes. There is no moral solution to this dispute that does not involve sovereign territory for both peoples,” Ryan told The Post.

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Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

Sanders supports a two-state solution, he told The Post. He backed a resolution in support of a two-state solution in June.

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Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Joe Sestak

Former U.S. representative, Pennsylvania

“Yes. This is an imperative both for the long-term security of Israel and the needs of the Palestinian people,” Sestak told The Post.

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Joe Sestak
Sestak

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

“Yes. I strongly support the two-state solution as the best way to address the Israeli-Palestinian conflict,” Warren told The Post.

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Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson supports a two-state solution, she told The Post. “The United States should have an equal and simultaneous support for both the legitimate security concerns of Israel, and the human rights, dignity and economic opportunities of the Palestinian people,” she told the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

“The only acceptable end to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict involves a two-state solution that allows both the Israeli and Palestinian people to have sovereign land and self-determination,” he told the Council on Foreign Relations.

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Andrew Yang
Yang

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Bill de Blasio (Dropped out)

Mayor, New York City

de Blasio is no longer running for president. De Blasio did not answer this question by publication.

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Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tom Steyer

Billionaire activist

Steyer did not answer this question by publication.

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Tom Steyer
Steyer

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Background Since Bill Clinton’s presidency, U.S. leaders have advocated for the creation of an autonomous Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza, a proposal known as the two-state solution. The Trump White House took a different approach in 2017, with a senior official telling reporters that the United States is open to that solution but did not want to impose it on the region. In 2018, Trump said that he personally liked the two-state solution, but that he was not committed to it. "If the Israelis and the Palestinians want one state, that's okay with me. If they want two-state, that's okay with me. I'm happy if they're happy," he said.

The Post is sending detailed questionnaires to every Democratic candidate asking for their stances on various issues. See all the issues we’ve asked about so far.

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How candidate positions were compiled

The Washington Post sent a detailed questionnaire to every Democratic presidential campaign asking whether it supports various changes to U.S. foreign policy. Candidates with similar stances were organized into groups using a combination of those answers, legislative records, action taken in an executive role, and other public comments, such as policy discussion on campaign websites, social media posts, interviews, town hall meetings and other news reports and surveys. See something we missed? Let us know.

We expect candidates to develop more detailed policy positions throughout the campaign, and this page will update as we learn more about their plans. We also will note if candidates change their position on an issue.

At initial publication, this page included major candidates who had announced a run for president and excluded any who had left the race. Wayne Messam, mayor of Miramar, Fla., reported $0 in spending during the 3rd quarter of 2019. As a result, he is no longer considered a "major candidate" in the Post's 2020 coverage and has been removed from this project.

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