immigration

Do you support a temporary freeze on all deportations?

Yes

Yes

Joe Biden

Former vice president

“Vice President [Biden] is absolutely committed to a 100 day moratorium on any deportations of people already in the United States,” his campaign and Latino Victory Fund said in a joint statement.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Elizabeth Warren (Dropped out)

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

Warren is no longer running for president. “I'm committed to in the first 100 days, stop all deportations until we get a chance to review them again,” Warren said in Feb. 2020. “And if this is, if these deportations that are on the table, the proposed ones, are not consistent with my policies, which means we don't scoop up family members, people who place no threat. People who are part of our communities, then they're not deported, they won't be deported. I want to put a complete halt until we can get that done.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Yes, with exceptions

Yes, with exceptions

Bernie Sanders (Dropped out)

U.S. senator, Vermont

Sanders is no longer running for president. Sanders's Nov. 2019 immigration plan said he would "institute a moratorium on deportations until a thorough audit of past practices and policies is complete." In Feb. 2020, his campaign manager said that such a policy would not cover a “violent criminal — violent criminals sit in jail or prison right now, upon their, the end of whatever sentence they may currently have, they would be deported.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

No

No

Mike Bloomberg (Dropped out)

Former New York mayor

Bloomberg is no longer running for president. “While [Bloomberg] wouldn't freeze deportations, he will swiftly replace the Trump administration's indiscriminate deportations and raids with sensible immigration enforcement priorities that promote public safety and national security,” a campaign spokesperson told The Post.

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Mike Bloomberg
Bloomberg

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Pete Buttigieg (Dropped out)

Former mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg is no longer running for president. Buttigieg's administration “will implement a process to review the current administration's deportation decisions. [He] will also review the current administration’s immigration policies and implement appropriate changes, including greater oversight and transparency,” his immigration plan said. He did not answer this question by publication.

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Tulsi Gabbard (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard is no longer running for president. Gabbard did not answer this question by publication.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Amy Klobuchar (Dropped out)

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar is no longer running for president. “While she jump-starts negotiations for comprehensive immigration reform with the stated goal of passing it within the first year, Senator Klobuchar will undo attempts by the Trump Administration — many of which have been blocked by courts — to deport DREAMers and immigrants who are living, working and succeeding here under Temporary Protected Status and Deferred Enforcement Departure,” her first 100 days plan said. Klobuchar did not answer this question by publication.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Tom Steyer (Dropped out)

Billionaire activist

Steyer is no longer running for president. Steyer did not answer this question by publication.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tom Steyer
Steyer

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Background ICE statistics show that the agency removed 267,258 people from the country in fiscal 2019, up from 240,255 people in fiscal 2016. In response, immigration activists and some candidates have said they want deportations suspended for a time.

The Post is sending detailed questionnaires to every Democratic candidate asking for their stances on various issues. See all the issues we’ve asked about so far.

See our other questions on immigration:

How candidate positions were compiled

The Washington Post sent a detailed questionnaire to every Democratic campaign asking whether it supports various changes to U.S. immigration and border security policy. Candidates with similar stances were organized into groups using a combination of those answers, legislative records, action taken in an executive role and other public comments, such as policy discussion on campaign websites, social media posts, interviews, town hall meetings and other news reports. See something we missed? Let us know.

This page will update as we learn more about the candidates’ plans. We also will note if candidates change their position on an issue. At initial publication, this page included major candidates who had announced a run for president. If a candidate dropped out after a question was published here, their stance is included under the "Show former candidates" option. If they dropped out before a question was first published, the Post did not reach out to get their stance.

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Candidate illustrations by Ben Kirchner.