health care

Do you support giving the federal government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare?

Yes

Yes, supports

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet's "campaign website touts his 'Medicare X' health care plan, saying it "empowers the federal government to negotiate lower prescription drug prices for the first time, bringing down costs for tens of millions of Americans." He co-sponsored the Empowering Medicare Seniors to Negotiate Drug Prices Act.

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Michael Bennet
Bennet

Joe Biden

Former vice president

“Because Medicare covers so many Americans, it has significant leverage to negotiate lower prices for its beneficiaries. And it does so for hospitals and other providers participating in the program, but not drug manufacturers. Drug manufacturers not facing any competition, therefore, can charge whatever price they choose to set. There’s no justification for this except the power of prescription drug lobbying,” Biden’s health-care plan said. “The Biden Plan will repeal the existing law explicitly barring Medicare from negotiating lower prices with drug corporations.”

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Joe Biden
Biden

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

Booker is a Senate co-sponsor of the Affordable Medications Act. He is also a co-sponsor of Sanders’s latest Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act.

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Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“Rising prescription drug costs have been a major factor in making health care unaffordable for many Americans,” Bullock told The Post. “The federal government should step in to negotiate lower costs for all of us.”

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Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg supports giving the government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare, he told The Post.

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Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro supports giving the government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare, he told The Post.

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Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"Yes. 100%," Delaney told The Post.

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John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio (Dropped out)

Mayor, New York City

de Blasio is no longer running for president. “The federal government caving into big pharma by not allowing Medicare to negotiate lower drug prices is costing America's seniors billions of dollars per year,” de Blasio told The Post.

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Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard is a co-sponsor of the Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act.

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Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand (Dropped out)

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand is no longer running for president. Gillibrand is a Senate co-sponsor of the Affordable Medications Act. She is also a co-sponsor of Sanders’s latest Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act.

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Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

She has co-sponsored Sanders’s latest Medicare negotiation bill.

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Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper (Dropped out)

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper is no longer running for president. Hickenlooper supports giving the government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare, he told The Post.

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John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee (Dropped out)

Governor, Washington state

Inslee is no longer running for president. Inslee supports giving the government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare, he told The Post.

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Jay Inslee
Inslee

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar is a co-sponsor of the Affordable Medications Act. In January, she introduced the Empowering Medicare Seniors to Negotiate Drug Prices Act.

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Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

Messam supports giving the government the ability to negotiate drug prices for Medicare, he told The Post.

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Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton is no longer running for president. “Yes. As someone who benefits from negotiated drug prices at the VA, I face lower prices for my prescriptions. If it works for our veterans it should work for all Americans,” Moulton told The Post.

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Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

As a Texas congressman, he co-sponsored the Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act.

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Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

“Drug prices are out of control. We need to rein in Big Pharma's price gouging tactics and allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices,” Ryan said in a Facebook post.

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Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

In January, he introduced the Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act. He is also a co-sponsor of the Affordable Medications Act.

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Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. “I will do anything that is safe for patients — from negotiating prices to better enforcement of antitrust laws — to make prescription drugs more affordable, because prices are simply too high now for too many Americans,” Swalwell told The Post.

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Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

Warren is a co-sponsor of the Affordable Medications Act. She is also a co-sponsor of Sanders’s latest Medicare Drug Price Negotiation Act.

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Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

"Yes," Williamson told The Post.

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Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

“Absolutely,” Yang told The Post.

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Andrew Yang
Yang

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Background By law, the federal government is not allowed to negotiate lower prescription drug prices for seniors on Medicare, but lawmakers have pushed for legislation to give federal officials that ability, such as the Medicare Prescription Drug Price Negotiation Act in the House and the Affordable Medications Act in the Senate.

A February 2019 poll from the Kaiser Family Foundation found 86 percent of the public favors allowing the government to negotiate with drug companies to lower drug costs under Medicare.

How we compiled candidate positions

The Washington Post sent a detailed questionnaire to every Democratic campaign asking whether they support various health-care policies. We organized candidates with similar stances into groups using a combination of those answers, legislative records, action taken in an executive role and other public comments, such as policy discussion on campaign websites, social media posts, interviews, town halls and other news reports. See something that we missed? Let us know.

The page will update to reflect candidates’ positions as they become more clear. We expect candidates to develop more detailed policy positions throughout the campaign, and this page will update as we learn more about their plans. We will also note if candidates change their position on an issue. At initial publication, this page included major candidates who had announced a run for president or an exploratory committee by March 13. The Post will reach out to additional candidates as they enter the race and then include them here.