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Policy 2020

Which of these 2020 Democrats agrees with you most?

It’s finally 2020, and voters will soon begin choosing their preferred candidate for president. The Post has asked each Democratic candidate where they stand on more than 85 policy questions.

Now, it’s your turn to answer. Below are 20 questions we found particularly interesting, mostly because they reveal big differences between the remaining major candidates. We haven’t asked the campaigns about every topic, but this selection tries to cover a variety of issues. Answer as many as you like.

[We’re asking 2020 Democrats where they stand on key issues]

Since we first published this guide in November, new candidates have joined the race and several others have dropped out. We have included everyone polling at least 1 percent in The Post’s national polling average. This new version adds questions on such topics as gun control and the criminal justice system.

Of course, policy stances are just one reason to pick a candidate. But if you haven’t been paying close attention to the campaign yet (and even if you have), this quiz can help clarify: What do you think? And which Democrats — if any — agree with you?

Update (Jan. 13, 2020): The quiz was expanded to include 11 additional questions. The question on the criminal statute related to border crossing has been removed. After publishing, Bloomberg’s campaign provided additional answers to the questions included in this quiz. Those stances are now included here.

Update (Nov. 20): Steyer and Warren provided additional answers to the questions included in this quiz. Those stances are now included here.

Update (Nov. 21): The descriptions of the Trump administration’s border policy and a criminal statute related to border crossing have been clarified.

Update (Nov. 22): Klobuchar’s campaign confirmed her stance on adding Supreme Court justices. That stance is now included here. Also further clarified the descriptions of the Trump administration’s border policy and a criminal statute related to border crossing.

Brittany Renee Mayes

Brittany Renee Mayes joined The Washington Post as a general assignment graphics reporter in June 2018. She previously worked at NPR on the visuals team as a news applications developer.

Kevin Uhrmacher

Kevin Uhrmacher is a graphics editor for politics covering elections and public policy at The Washington Post.

Kevin Schaul

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

About this story

The Washington Post sent detailed questionnaires to every Democratic campaign asking whether they support various policies. We organized candidates with similar stances into groups using a combination of those answers, legislative records, action taken in an executive role and other public comments, such as policy discussion on campaign websites, social media posts, interviews, town halls and other news reports. This quiz includes everyone earning at least one percent in The Post’s national polling average as of January 13.

On paid family leave, candidates who support more than 12 weeks are considered in agreement with readers who choose 12 weeks for the final results table calculation. Those candidates would likely support 12 weeks of paid family leave even if they preferred more.

See something we missed? Let us know.

Curious about where candidates stand on another policy? Fill out this suggestion form.

Originally published Nov. 18, 2019.

Candidate illustrations by Ben Kirchner.

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