Where 2020 Democratic candidates stand on the electoral college, court packing and changes to democracy

The Democratic Party’s 2020 presidential candidates have called for a number of changes to the rules of American democracy, backing plans to abolish the electoral college, eliminate the Senate filibuster and lower the voting age to 16, among other far-reaching proposals.

The push to reform U.S. democracy comes amid frustration among liberals about losing multiple presidential elections in which Democrats won the popular vote, as well as the successful effort by congressional Republicans to block President Barack Obama’s pick for the Supreme Court.

Republicans have assailed these ideas as attempts to tilt the playing field in Democrats’ favor, with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) calling a House proposal to make Election Day a federal holiday a “power grab.” But activists have pushed these questions to the forefront of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary.

Where the candidates stand

Here’s where the candidates stand on changes to the rules of U.S. democracy, based on their statements, voting records and answers to a questionnaire that was sent to every campaign.

Question 1 of 10

Eliminate it

Eliminate it

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet has run Facebook ads calling for an end to the electoral college. "The electoral college is outdated," the posts said. "Americans should directly elect our presidents."

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

“I believe very simply that, in presidential elections, the person with the most votes should be the president of the United States,” Booker said at a CNN town hall. “But I want to tell you, for us ever to get to a point where we can address that issue, we have got to win this next election under the rules that are there now.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

"It’s gotta go," Buttigieg told Post columnist Greg Sargent. "We need a national popular vote. It would be reassuring from the perspective of believing that we’re a democracy. But I also think it would be highly encouraging of voter participation on the national level."

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro tweeted support for a variety of voting changes in March, including eliminating the electoral college.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

“This is absolutely unprecedented, and I think it creates a huge question for our democracy. How is the president-elect going to proceed knowing that he had 2.3 million more people vote for his opponent,” de Blasio said in 2016, according to Politico.

Dec. 19: “Cast my Electoral College vote today. Still sick over a system that rejects the choice of a 2.8 million majority. End the E.C.!”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand supports eliminating the electoral college.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"It ought to be one person, one vote. The fastest way for this to happen is for other states to join Washington in a contract that we will vote our electoral ballots the way the popular vote goes, nationally. As soon as you get to a majority of states, you wouldn’t need a constitutional amendment."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

"It’s very rare that I will say this, but Donald Trump was correct. He once called the electoral college a ‘disaster for democracy.’ Boy, was he right," Messam told The Post. “If we believe [every vote counts], we shouldn’t have a system where a candidate can lose by three million votes and somehow be declared the winner. The electoral college forces candidates to cater to certain people in certain states. ... That doesn’t make for a good democracy, and we should do away with it and reform our elections.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

“We all know the obvious reason this needs to be replaced with a popular-vote system: In 2016, approximately 3 million more Americans voted for Hillary Clinton than Donald Trump, and yet, Trump is the president,” Moulton wrote in a Washington Post op-ed.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke told The Post that he supports eliminating the electoral college, and in the meantime, improving it by having states award electors proportionally. "That would force whoever the Democratic and Republican nominees are to campaign everywhere, not writing anyone off or taking anyone for granted."

Mar. 19: “I think there’s a lot of wisdom in that.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"I believe that it is hard to defend the current system in which one candidate receives 3 million votes less than his opponent, but still becomes president," Sanders told The Post. "Further, presidential elections cannot be fought out in just a dozen "battleground" states. I believe that we need to reexamine the concept of the electoral college." He later tweeted support for abolishing the electoral college.

Jul. 19: “Abolish the Electoral College.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell supports abolishing the electoral college, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"Full voting rights are key to ensuring working people across our country have a say in the direction America goes," Warren told The Post. "Every vote matters — and that’s why I have called for an end to the electoral college in favor of the national popular vote movement."

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

"Changes to the Constitution should not be taken lightly, but at this point there is too much of a risk to our democracy when the popular vote can be so easily overridden," Williamson told The Post. "Therefore, I do support the elimination of the electoral college."

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Open to eliminating

Open to eliminating

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

"I'm open to the discussion," Harris told Jimmy Kimmel. "I mean, there's no question that the popular vote has been diminished in terms of making the final decision about who's the president of the United States and we need to deal with that."

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar is open to eliminating the electoral college, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan “is open to eliminating the electoral college in favor of the popular vote, but believes the focus should instead be on the issues front and center on the minds of most Americans -- which are jobs, wages, and health care,” a campaign spokesman said.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Maintain it

Maintain it

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“No,” Bullock told The Post. “While it is troubling that in two of the last five elections the popular vote and the electoral college vote had different results, we need to focus on why Democrats aren’t winning some communities rather than scrap an institution that has been around since our nation’s founding. Even if we cobble together 271 electoral votes, we won’t be able to lead our nation forward if we aren’t including every community. The bigger issue is that we need to not just win, but govern.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"If I was starting from scratch, yes, but trying to abolish the electoral college now is impractical," Delaney told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

"While many of us are frustrated with the way the electoral college works ... there is no possibility of abolishing it in the near term," Hickenlooper told The Post. "So we need to focus on expanding the Democratic electorate — going into suburbs and rural areas."

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

"Abolishing the electoral college would be difficult and would wind up further favoring high-density high-population areas with big media markets that would be the focus of national campaigns," Yang told The Post. "It’s also a bad message to send that losing elections should be responded to by changing the rules set forward in our Constitution. That said, I do believe there are changes to be made to the way we select the president, including how electors are apportioned and implementing ranked-choice voting, that would improve our democracy."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

Biden did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard supports reforming the electoral college or exploring the Proportional Plan but doesn’t want to eliminate it, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

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Background Sen. Jeff Merkley (Ore.) introduced legislation that would replace the electoral college with a national popular vote. The measure would require a constitutional amendment. Several states have pushed an "interstate compact" in which states would agree to allocate their electoral votes to the candidate who wins the national popular vote, regardless of the winner in their state.

Question 2 of 10

Yes

Yes, eliminate it

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“I support eliminating the Senate filibuster,” Bullock told The Post. “Washington has become a place where talking has taken the place of doing. The Senate is broken and the partisan filibuster is impeding the functioning of good government by removing incentives to cooperate.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"I was the first Democratic candidate for the 2020 nomination to call for ending the filibuster. It is an arcane Senate rule that belongs in the dustbin of history," Inslee told The Post. "It is hard to take candidates seriously who say they want to pursue major climate change or health care legislation if they cling to senatorial privilege like the filibuster."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

"Sen. McConnell makes a mockery of the rules, and then whines when Democrats talk about changing them," Messam told The Post. "The current use of the filibuster isn’t what the Founders intended, as it is being misused to stop all legislative efforts. What Sen. McConnell has wrought is bad for Democracy, and I believe it should be removed."

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

“The filibuster is also holding us back, ensuring our laws don’t change with the will of voters,” Moulton wrote in a Washington Post op-ed. “Issues such as climate change won’t wait, and neither can we.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell supports eliminating the filibuster, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"We’re done with having two sets of rules," Warren announced on April 5. "When Democrats have the White House again, if Mitch McConnell continues to put small-minded partisanship ahead of solving the massive problems facing our country, then we should get rid of the filibuster." Warren had previously told The Post that she was open to the change.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Open to it

Open to it

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

“Both of these suggestions, I'm not taking off the table,” Booker said of changes to the filibuster and court packing. In a March Pod Save America interview, Booker explained that “We are heading that way" toward eliminating the filibuster but that GOP leadership "would have hurt people in my community” if the filibuster were not in place. He was one of 61 senators to sign a letter supporting the 60-vote filibuster threshold in 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

"We should consider it," Buttigieg told the Intercept. "I mean, that’s something the senators have to figure out but it’s got to be on the table because our sense of fair play among Democrats has bitten us far too many times for us to be naive about it."

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro is open to eliminating the filibuster, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

"That's another one that is important for us to look at how we solve this or make changes that are not based on partisanship," Gabbard told a reporter. "Often it is the party that is in the minority that is calling for bringing about those changes and then once they get into the majority then they say no, absolutely not, we're not going to change this."

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

"It’s a very important question. I want to weigh all the pros and the cons over the next few weeks," Gillibrand told Politico earlier this year. In 2017, she was one of 61 senators to sign a letter supporting the 60-vote filibuster threshold.

Jan. 22: “If you don't have 60 votes yet, it just means you haven't done enough advocacy and you need to work a lot harder.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Recently, Harris said she was "conflicted" about the filibuster. She was one of 61 senators to sign a letter supporting the 60-vote filibuster threshold in 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper’s campaign said he supports “amending the Senate rules on a case-by-case basis.”

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar is open to eliminating the filibuster, she told The Post. She was one of 61 senators to sign a letter supporting the 60-vote filibuster threshold in 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

"We should seriously consider getting rid of the filibuster," O'Rourke told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"I believe in filibuster reform and making it much harder for any one senator to bring the Senate to a halt," Sanders told The Post. "I also believe, as recent history has shown, that major legislation can be passed by majority vote through the budget reconciliation process." He had previously told CBS News he was “not crazy about getting rid of the filibuster.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Marianne Williamson

Author

"I believe that an individual Senator who strongly opposes a piece of legislation should be allowed to hold the floor for as long as she can stand," Williamson told The Post. "But given the unprecedented partisanship that Republicans have thrust on this country — exemplified by their refusal to even hold hearings on Merrick Garland — I do not believe that the Senate can function if legislation requires a super majority to pass. Thus, I believe that individual filibusters should continue to be an option, but that they be followed by a simple up or down, majority-wins vote."

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

"I would be open to it," Yang told The Post. "The filibuster is not in the Constitution which requires a supermajority for only very specific things like lifetime appointments and impeachment. There is a built-in system of checks and balances already without adding the filibuster. That said it should be everyone’s preference to get a clear majority of legislators on board for major legislation."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

No

No, do not eliminate it

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet was one of 61 senators to sign a 2017 letter supporting the 60-vote filibuster threshold.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"If we want to pass long-lasting, meaningful legislation, it should be done with a 60-vote majority," Delaney told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio does not support eliminating the filibuster, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan does not support eliminating the filibuster, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

Biden did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

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Background Senate rules effectively require 60 of 100 senators to support legislation for it to pass the chamber. This “supermajority” requirement makes it harder to pass bills through the Senate, empowering the chamber’s minority but making ambitious changes harder to enact. Senators have traditionally sought to protect the filibuster, but liberals argue that it allows relatively few states to thwart the popular will of the country and vital changes. Democrats are in the minority in the Senate, but are considering filibuster changes if they win back control.

Senate Republicans in 2017 used the "nuclear option" to require only a simple majority to approve Supreme Court nominations; Senate Democrats in 2013 did so to eliminate the 60-vote rule on federal judicial appointments and executive appointments.

Question 3 of 10

Open to it

Open to it

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

“Our Supreme Court is way out of whack,” Booker said in New Hampshire. “I’m not sure right now what the best way of accomplishing that balance is ... I don't have all the solutions, but I feel the same urgency you do. I'm taking nothing off the table. But right now I really worry about a race to the bottom.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“I’ve argued in front of the Supreme Court, and I want to believe that it isn’t a political entity and that it doesn’t take sides,” Bullock told The Post. “Mitch McConnell injected politics into the Supreme Court when he refused to hold a hearing for Merrick Garland, damaging the institution’s credibility in the eyes of the American people. I’m open to discussion on different ways we can depoliticize the Supreme Court, including expanding the court.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg's campaign told The Post on April 5 that he is open to adding justices to ‘pack’ the Supreme Court. "So, we definitely need to do structural reform on the Supreme Court. Adding justices can be part of the solution but not in and of itself, it’s not enough," Buttigieg told the Intercept. "What we’ve got to do is depoliticize it and one solution that I’ve been discussing in recent weeks is structuring it with 15 members but five of whom can only be seated by a unanimous consensus of the other 10."

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand told Politico that she is open to expanding the Supreme Court.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

“We are on the verge of a crisis of confidence in the Supreme Court,” Harris told Politico. “We have to take this challenge head on, and everything is on the table to do that.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"Mitch McConnell destroyed Americans’ faith in the Supreme Court to be fair and representative body by stealing a seat from Barack Obama and refusing to give Merrick Garland even a hearing. We must be thoughtful and considerate about any changes to the Supreme Court, but we also need to restore Americans’ faith in the court and restore the balance that McConnell broke. I'm open to any ideas and discussion on how to reset that balance."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“Make no mistake, the court is already packed,” Messam told The Post, speaking of Republicans’ decision to withhold a vote on an Obama nominee. “If Sen. McConnell chooses to play by a different set of rules, as he so often does, then so will I.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Court packing should "be on the table," Moulton told The Post. "You don't show up to a gun fight with a knife. You try to show up with a rocket."

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

“It’s not just about expansion, it’s about depoliticizing the Supreme Court,” Warren told Politico. “It’s a conversation that’s worth having.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

"I don’t believe it’s something that should be ruled out, particularly given the hyperpartisan behavior regarding Merrick Garland and recent Supreme Court appointments," Yang told The Post. "But I think other changes to the Supreme Court, such as imposing 18-year term limits, would be equally effective at making the court more modern and responsive and would introduce new justices on a regular timeline."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

No

No, does not support

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

“Having seen up close just how cynical and how vicious the tea party guys and the Freedom Caucus guys and Mitch McConnell have been, the last thing I want to do is be those guys,” Bennet told The Post at a coffee shop in March. “What I want to do is beat these guys so that we can begin to govern again.” Bennet slammed his head on the table four times when asked about other Democrats' embrace of court packing.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, but is open to other reforms, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

Delaney does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

“I do not think expanding the Supreme Court makes sense,” de Blasio told The New York Times.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, her campaign told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

"I’m concerned by the precedent this could set" Hickenlooper told The Post. "As President I could add 5 seats but the next Republican president might then add 6 more. I am concerned about the current conservative composition of the Court and the threat it poses to core values like reproductive rights and civil rights. I also condemn the refusal of the Republican Senate to give President Obama’s nominee, Judge Merrick Garland, a hearing or vote, and I would support reforms that require a vote on a president’s nominee within a set period."

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, his campaign told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"No," Sanders told The Post. "Once the process of packing the court starts, it could continue with each political party adding more judges when they have the power to do so."

Apr. 1: “My worry is that the next time the Republicans are in power, they’ll do the same thing. What may make sense is not term limits, but rotating them to the appeals court.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell told The Post that he wouldn’t consider it. “I don’t want to let these extraordinary times that President Trump has created lead us to too many extraordinary remedies, or for ideas like these to be alibis for failures to win and hold governing majorities,” he said.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson does not support adding seats to the Supreme Court, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

Biden did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

According to CBS News, Klobuchar's priority is getting fair and qualified judges through the existing system.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

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Background Liberals have increasingly called for the next Democratic president to unilaterally increase the number of Supreme Court justices. The left’s calls to do so grew after Senate Republicans’ successful attempt to block Merrick Garland, President Barack Obama’s 2016 nominee to the bench. President Franklin D. Roosevelt famously planned to pack the high court after its conservative members struck down parts of his popular legislative accomplishments, such as minimum wage increases. Roosevelt backed down from the plan after the court reversed its ruling on the minimum wage issue.

Question 4 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"I am for an 18-year term limit for Supreme Court justices," Delaney told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“I think lifetime appointments to the bench have warped the system, with each side picking younger, less experienced judges because they are hoping to hold seats for decades,” Messam told The Post. He backed a 15-year term limit.

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke’s voting rights plan calls for a constitutional amendment that would include “18-year terms for the Supreme Court, after which the justices would be permitted to serve on the federal courts of appeals.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

"When the nation was founded, life expectancy was much shorter, and justices would also frequently step down from the Court to pursue other endeavors. That’s no longer the case," Yang told The Post. "I’d support 18-year term limits, staggered every two years, so that each president would be guaranteed the appointment of two justices per term served. Seats vacated for other reasons could be filled through the current mechanism."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Open to it

Open to it

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

“It has piqued my mind,” Bennet told The Daily Beast. “We are now in a situation where, at least for the immediate future and maybe forever, we are going to put people on the Court by the barest partisan majority. We will have to have a president and the Senate from the same party [for a nominee to be confirmed]. That is an incredible distortion in our system and it hasn’t been the way it’s worked until now.” Term limits “could be an answer to it,” he said.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

"I think we need to fix the Supreme Court," Booker said on MSNBC. "I think I would like to start exploring a lot of options and we should have a national conversation. Term limits for Supreme Court justices might be one thing — to give every president the ability to choose three."

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

"Potentially. But it’s not a cure all because it creates some problems too," Buttigieg told the Intercept.

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro is open to Supreme Court term limits, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand has called adding Supreme Court justices, or imposing term limits on them, “interesting ideas that I would have to think more about.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

“We are on the verge of a crisis of confidence in the Supreme Court,” Harris told Politico. “We have to take this challenge head on, and everything is on the table to do that.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"Mitch McConnell destroyed Americans’ faith in the Supreme Court to be fair and representative body by stealing a seat from Barack Obama and refusing to give Merrick Garland even a hearing. We must be thoughtful and considerate about any changes to the Supreme Court, but we also need to restore Americans’ faith in the court and restore the balance that McConnell broke. I'm open to any ideas and discussion on how to reset that balance."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"[Republicans] changed the rules of the filibuster to steal a Supreme Court seat and have stuffed our courts to the brim with judges hostile to voting rights" Warren told The Post. "If Republicans are going to try to block us on key legislation or judges that we’re trying to move forward, then you better believe all the options are on the table."

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

No

No, does not support

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

Bullock does not support Supreme Court term limits, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper would not support term limits for Supreme Court justices, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

According to CBS News, Klobuchar's priority is getting fair and qualified judges through the existing system.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan does not support term limits for Supreme Court justices, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell told The Post he wouldn’t consider it. “I don’t want to let these extraordinary times that President Trump has created lead us to too many extraordinary remedies, or for ideas like these to be alibis for failures to win and hold governing majorities,” he said.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson does not support term limits for Supreme Court justices, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

Biden did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"I have to hear more discussion on this issue before commenting," Sanders told The Post. He seemingly referenced the proposal during the first Democratic debate, saying ”... I do believe that constitutionally we have the power to rotate judges to other courts.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Question 5 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet co-sponsored the Senate's version of the For the People Act, which would enact automatic voter registration, among other reforms.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Joe Biden

Former vice president

"We should have automatic registration. We should have it allowing everybody to vote," Biden told CBS News.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

In 2017, Booker tweeted that "America has a troubled history of voter suppression. It's time to reverse course." He called for several changes including automatic voter registration and early voting.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“Yes. We should be doing everything we can do to make it easier for people to vote — that includes making Election Day a National Holiday and implementing automatic voter registration and pre-registration for younger, civic-minded folks,” Bullock told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg has said he supports automatic voter registration.

Mar. 8: “#HR1 would expand our rights as voters with much needed reforms like automatic voter registration and transparency on dark money.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro tweeted support for a variety of voting changes in March.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"Voting is our most sacred democratic right and we should be making it easier to allow people to vote not finding ways to suppress it," Delaney told The Post. He co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act of 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio supports automatic voter registration, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand introduced the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019 and co-sponsored theRegister America to Vote Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris co-sponsored the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

During Hickenlooper's tenure, Colorado began automatic voter registration for anyone who interacted with the DMV and did not opt-out. The state also allows 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-registrer to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

Inslee signed automatic voter registration into law in his state in 2018.

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar introduced the Register America to Vote Act and co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act of 2017.

Feb. 10: “It is time to pass my bill to automatically register every young person to vote when they turn 18.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“We must ensure that every American can participate in our democracy,” Messam told The Post. “I believe we should make it easier to participate — not put up roadblocks.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton called for “a new voting rights act to enact automatic registration” on his campaign website.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

“Americans should not have to jump through hoops to exercise their fundamental right to vote. Being registered should be the default,” O'Rourke’s voting rights plan said. He committed to “spearhead a nationwide shift to automatic and same day voter registration.” He co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act of 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act of 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

Sanders co-sponsored the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell supports automatic voter registration, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"Election Day should be a holiday and voter registration should be automatic," Warren told The Post. She co-sponsored the Automatic Voter Registration Act of 2017 and the Voter Empowerment Act of 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson calls for automatic voter registration on her campaign website.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

Yang supports automatic voter registration, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

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Background House Democrats have passed legislation that would automatically register eligible U.S. citizens to vote, arguing that onerous registration requirements create barriers to voting. Fifteen states and Washington, D.C., already automatically enroll citizens to vote when they interact with a government agency, unless they opt out, according to the Brennan Center for Justice. Only 56 percent of the U.S. voting-age population cast ballots in the 2016 presidential election, according to the Pew Research Center, which placed the United States near the bottom among peer nations for voter turnout in nationwide elections.

Question 6 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet supports an Election Day holiday, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

"Voting is one of our most sacred duties and hard fought rights and Election Day should be recognized as a federal holiday,” Booker told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

Bullock supports an Election Day holiday, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg has backed the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which included a provision making Election Day a federal holiday when it was introduced. “Pete also supports other provisions to ensure full access for people with disabilities and low-income people that may not be provided by a holiday,” a campaign spokesman told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro tweeted support for a variety of voting changes in March.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"In Congress, I introduced Open Our Democracy Act, which, in addition to creating an independent redistricting commission, would make Election Day a federal holiday," Delaney told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio supports an Election Day holiday, his campaign told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard co-sponsored the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which included a provision making Election Day a federal holiday when it was introduced.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

"Let's make Election Day a federal holiday so you don't have to take time off work to exercise your rights," Gillibrand wrote on Instagram, backing the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Feb. 19: “There is no question that Election Day should be a national holiday.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper supports an Election Day holiday, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"Republican national voter suppression efforts, which has degraded voter turnout in communities of color across the country, illustrates the necessity of national mail-in paper ballots, mailed to voters 3+ weeks before Election Day," Inslee told The Post. "My state has adopted automatic voter registration, all mail-in paper ballot voting, with pre-paid postage, and it is a model for the country."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar expressed support for the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which included a provision making Election Day a federal holiday when it was introduced.

Mar. 8: “The House did its job, and now it's the Senate's turn.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

Messam told The Post that he supports making Election Day a national holiday. “But we also must remember that there are a great number of people, especially those at the lowest rung of the economic ladder, that may not be eligible for such a holiday,” he said. “That’s why we need mail-in-ballots and early voting.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton co-sponsored the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which included a provision making Election Day a federal holiday when it was introduced.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke's voting rights plan included a commitment to “call on Congress to establish a National Voting Day holiday,” expanded vote-by-mail and early voting and polling stations placed at “grand, iconic locations.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan co-sponsored the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which included a provision making Election Day a federal holiday when it was introduced.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

Sanders introduced the Democracy Day Act of 2015 to make Election Day a national holiday.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. “Yes, I support making Election Day a national federal holiday,” Swalwell told The Post. “And the nation should emulate California’s and other states’ successes with vote-by-mail and extended early voting.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"I also believe we need a constitutional amendment that protects the right to vote for every American citizen and to make sure that vote gets counted," Warren told The Post. "Election Day should be a holiday and voter registration should be automatic ... Early voting and vote by mail is necessary so no one has to choose between a paycheck or exercising their right to vote. "

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson calls for an Election Day holiday on her campaign website.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

In response to possible voting conveniences, such as an Election Day holiday, mail-in ballots and extended early voting, Yang told The Post, "Yes to all. It should be much easier to vote."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

"We’ve got to make it easier — not harder — for Americans to exercise their right to vote, regardless of their zip code or the color of their skin, and make sure we count every voter’s voice equally," Biden's campaign site said. His campaign had not returned answers by May 7.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

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Background Democrats have called for Election Day to be a national holiday, to make it easier for those who cannot secure time off from work to vote. The United States is one of the few democracies to vote on a weekday. Sunday is the most common election day around the world, according to Victoria Shineman, an assistant professor in the University of Pittsburgh political science department.

Question 7 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Joe Biden

Former vice president

"You should be a state," Biden said at a press conference with the D.C. mayor in 2015.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

Booker co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“Yes. Every American deserves to have a voice in our democracy,” Bullock told The Post. “When American citizens are denied basic representation, our whole country suffers. About 700,000 Americans live in the District of Columbia. They deserve the same kind of representation afforded to the rest of the nation.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg supports statehood for Washington, D.C., he tweeted in February.

Feb. 7: “Democracy is front and center right now, but some very important dimensions (like electoral college reform, DC statehood) get way too little attention. We must not become the first generation to see USA get less democratic versus more.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro tweeted support for a variety of voting changes in March, including statehood for Washington, D.C.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

Delaney co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio co-sponsored a resolution in favor of D.C. statehood in 2016.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper supports statehood for Washington, D.C., he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

Inslee supports statehood for Washington, D.C., he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“Taxation without representation is unfair. The people in D.C. deserves a voice and a vote,” Messam told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke supports D.C. statehood, he told The Post. He co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2017.

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

Sanders co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act in 2017 and backed D.C. statehood in a CNN town hall in February 2019.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell supports statehood for Washington, D.C., he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"We should admit DC as the 51st state," Warren told The Post. She co-sponsored the Washington, D.C. Admission Act.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson supports statehood for Washington, D.C., she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

Yang backed D.C. statehood in a tweet in December 2018.

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

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Background House Democrats’ set of proposed democracy reforms includes making the District of Columbia the 51st state in the union. The District has a larger population than two states and lacks voting members in Congress, and its residents pay more in federal taxes than roughly 20 states, The Post has reported. The measure is expected to be opposed by Republicans, as it is likely to lead to the election of two additional Democratic senators, shifting the partisan balance of the Senate.

Question 8 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

Delaney supports statehood for Puerto Rico, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio supports statehood for Puerto Rico, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"I’ve always supported statehood for Puerto Rico and D.C. People have got to have representation — 700,000 people in the District of Columbia is as large as Wyoming," Inslee told Vox.

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“The people of Puerto Rico have overwhelmingly voted to become a state. There is no good reason for them to continue to be treated as second-class citizens,” Messam told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton’s campaign website calls for “giving all Americans representation by granting statehood to Puerto Rico and D.C.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

“The people of Puerto Rico rightly demand that the United States government hear their voices,” a campaign spokesman told The Post. “[O’Rourke] supports the timely resolution of Puerto Rico’s political status by ensuring that the federal government acts in accordance with the democratically expressed will of the people of Puerto Rico, whether by an up or down vote on statehood or otherwise.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson supports statehood for Puerto Rico, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

The platform on Yang's campaign site backs Puerto Rican statehood, saying "Puerto Ricans overwhelmingly want to be a state, and we should endorse this and make it happen."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Let them decide

Let them decide

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet supports allowing Puerto Ricans to choose whether they want to join the union, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

Booker supports allowing Puerto Ricans to choose whether they want to join the union.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“This decision should be left to Puerto Ricans to decide,” Bullock told The Post. “I support the right of Puerto Rico’s residents to decide for themselves their future relationship with the United States.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

"If they want it," Buttigieg told the Intercept.

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro tweeted support for a variety of voting changes in March, including "self-determination for Puerto Rico."

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

In 2015, Gabbard co-sponsored the Puerto Rico Statehood Admission Process Act to allow for a vote on the island's admission as a state.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand supports allowing Puerto Ricans to choose whether they want to join the union.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper supports allowing Puerto Ricans to choose whether they want to join the union, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar supports allowing Puerto Ricans to choose whether they want to join the union, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

In 2015, Ryan co-sponsored the Puerto Rico Statehood Admission Process Act to allow for a vote on the island's admission as a state.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"I support the right of the people of Puerto Rico to decide their own future and governance," Sanders told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. “Yes, if that’s the will of the people living there,” Swalwell told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

"Puerto Rico has a right to determine the nature of its association with the United States and I will support the decision of the people of Puerto Rico," Warren told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

"I have always found Puerto Rico's current political status as something very bizarre. My word of advice to you, and all Puerto Ricans, is that you continue to fight hard until you reach your goal of equality, and we shall act," Biden said in 2015, according to the Orlando Sentinel. His campaign had not returned answers by May 7.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

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Background Rep. Darren Soto (D-Fla.) in March released legislation to make Puerto Rico, an island territory of the United States for more than a century, the 51st state in America. Puerto Rico elects a non-voting member of the U.S. House, but it does not have two senators or a vote in U.S. presidential general elections. (Puerto Rico does vote in both parties’ presidential primaries.) The island has been in an economic recession and debt crisis for more than a decade, and faces uneven support from the federal government.

Statehood is a divisive issue in Puerto Rico, although the current governor has been an adamant supporter of making the island the 51st state. A 2017 referendum on the statehood question was overwhelmingly approved but boycotted and derided as illegitimate by those in Puerto Rico opposed to statehood.

Question 9 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton supported a failed amendment to the For the People Act that would have lowered the voting age to 16 for federal elections.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan supported a failed amendment to the For the People Act that would have lowered the voting age to 16 for federal elections.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. Swalwell supports lowering the voting age for federal elections, he told The Post. “I recently voted on an amendment to H.R. 1 to allow those 16 and older to vote in federal elections.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

Yang supports lowering the voting age, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Open to it

Open to it

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“I am willing to consider this issue,” Bullock told The Post. “We should create more opportunities for young people to pre-register.

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

"I’m not sold on that but I think we could have the debate," Buttigieg told the Intercept. "Look the rationale from 21 to 18 made a lot of sense, young Americans who were old enough to be sent to war but weren’t allowed to vote. I think a lot of things change at 18 that are different things that change at 16 but I wouldn’t close off debate on the topic."

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro is open to lowering the voting age, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

De Blasio is open to lowering the voting age, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard supported a failed amendment to the For the People Act that would have lowered the voting age to 16 for federal elections.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

"I support local experimentation, such as the steps some localities have made to allow 16 year olds to vote on school board elections," Hickenlooper told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

"I am proud that Washington state has adopted early voting registration for 16 and 17-year olds," Inslee told The Post. "Having marched with young students striking on climate, I know this generation’s commitment and determination when it comes to fighting climate change. This is a new idea that I would think about."

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

"We should look into that and harnessing the full energy, interest and input of young people who are leading this country in so many ways and on so many issues," O'Rourke told The Post. His voting rights plan calls for “pre-registration for sixteen- and seventeen-year-olds.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"I favor doing everything we can to revitalize American democracy and bring more people into the political process," Sanders told The Post. "In terms of lowering the voting age I would be interested in seeing if there is interest in that at the local and state level, and how that plays out."

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson is open to lowering the voting age, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

No

No, does not support

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

Delaney does not support lowering the voting age, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“I think that 18 is the right age,” Messam told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet co-sponsored the PROVE Act, to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote. He did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Joe Biden

Former vice president

Biden did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

Booker did not provide an answer to this question. He co-sponsored the PROVE Act, to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris did not provide an answer to this question. She co-sponsored the PROVE Act, to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar did not provide an answer to this question. She co-sponsored the PROVE Act, to allow 16- and 17-year-olds to pre-register to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

Warren did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Question 10 of 10

Yes

Yes, supports

Michael Bennet

U.S. senator, Colorado

Bennet co-sponsored the Senate's version of the For the People Act, which would restore voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, among other reforms.

Candidate positions highlighted
Michael Bennet
Bennet

Cory Booker

U.S. senator, New Jersey

Booker told NPR, "This is a way, I think, that poor people especially - low-income people are being stripped of their democratic power."

Candidate positions highlighted
Cory Booker
Booker

Steve Bullock

Governor, Montana

“Absolutely,” Bullock told The Post. “In Montana, we’ve led the way by ensuring that voting rights are restored to formerly incarcerated people the second they’re finished serving their time. The rest of the country needs to meet that standard.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Steve Bullock
Bullock

Pete Buttigieg

Mayor, South Bend, Ind.

Buttigieg supports restoring voting rights for all formerly incarcerated people, his campaign told The Post. “Pete believes that as soon as someone is released, without any red tape, without any costs, they should be able to vote,” a campaign spokesman said.

Candidate positions highlighted
Pete Buttigieg
Buttigieg

Julian Castro

Former mayor, San Antonio

Castro supports restoring voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Julian Castro
Castro

John Delaney

Former U.S. representative, Maryland

"Unconditionally," Delaney told The Post. "Once they’ve served their time, their rights should be restored."

Candidate positions highlighted
John Delaney
Delaney

Bill de Blasio

Mayor, New York City

“We have to absolutely change our approach to get people to participate, we’ve got to open up the democratic process and encourage people,” de Blasio told NY1 after launching a registration effort at the Rikers Island prison.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bill de Blasio
de Blasio

Tulsi Gabbard

U.S. representative, Hawaii

Gabbard supports restoring voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tulsi Gabbard
Gabbard

Kirsten Gillibrand

U.S. senator, New York

Gillibrand introduced the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019, which guarantees formerly incarcerated individuals the right to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kirsten Gillibrand
Gillibrand

Kamala D. Harris

U.S. senator, California

Harris co-sponsored the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019 which guarantees formerly incarcerated individuals the right to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Kamala Harris
Harris

John Hickenlooper

Former governor, Colorado

Hickenlooper supports voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
John Hickenlooper
Hickenlooper

Jay Inslee

Governor, Washington state

Inslee supports voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Jay Inslee
Inslee

Amy Klobuchar

U.S. senator, Minnesota

Klobuchar supports voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Amy Klobuchar
Klobuchar

Wayne Messam

Mayor, Miramar, Fla.

“Absolutely,” Messam told The Post. “If you have paid your debt to society, then you should regain all the rights available to you as a citizen.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Wayne Messam
Messam

Seth Moulton

U.S. representative, Massachusetts

Moulton co-sponsored the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which would restore voting rights to pepole who have completed felony sentences.

Candidate positions highlighted
Seth Moulton
Moulton

Beto O'Rourke

Former U.S. representative, Texas

O'Rourke supports restoring voting rights for formerly incarcerated individuals, he told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Beto O'Rourke
O'Rourke

Tim Ryan

U.S. representative, Ohio

Ryan co-sponsored the For the People Act of 2019, also know as H.R. 1, which would restore voting rights to pepole who have completed felony sentences.

Candidate positions highlighted
Tim Ryan
Ryan

Bernie Sanders

U.S. senator, Vermont

"If people have paid their debt to society, they deserve the right to vote," Sanders told The Post. He co-sponsored the Voter Empowerment Act of 2019 which guarantees formerly incarcerated individuals the right to vote.

Candidate positions highlighted
Bernie Sanders
Sanders

Eric Swalwell (Dropped out)

U.S. representative, California

Swalwell is no longer running for president. “I support restoring voting rights to all formerly incarcerated persons,” Swalwell told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Eric Swalwell
Swalwell

Elizabeth Warren

U.S. senator, Massachusetts

“Once someone pays their debt to society, they’re out there expected to pay taxes, expected to abide by the law, they’re expected to support themselves and their families," Warren told supporters. "I think that means they’ve got a right to vote.”

Candidate positions highlighted
Elizabeth Warren
Warren

Marianne Williamson

Author

Williamson supports voting rights for formerly incarcerated people, she told The Post.

Candidate positions highlighted
Marianne Williamson
Williamson

Andrew Yang

Tech entrepreneur

"I believe in restoring federal voting rights to all formerly incarcerated people," Yang told The Post. "They served their time, and they are citizens; they should be able to vote."

Candidate positions highlighted
Andrew Yang
Yang

Unclear/No response

Unclear/No response

Joe Biden

Former vice president

"Efforts to disenfranchise eligible voters are just as un-American now as they were during Jim Crow," Biden's campaign website said. His campaign did not provide an answer to this question.

Candidate positions highlighted
Joe Biden
Biden

How candidate positions were compiled

The Washington Post sent a detailed questionnaire to every Democratic campaign asking whether it supports various changes to the Senate filibuster, U.S. elections and courts. Candidates with similar stances were organized into groups using a combination of those answers, legislative records, action taken in an executive role and other public comments, such as policy discussion on campaign websites, social media posts, interviews, town hall meetings and other news reports. See something we missed? Let us know.

We expect candidates to develop more detailed policy positions throughout the campaign, and this page will update as we learn more about their plans. We also will note if candidates change their position on an issue. At initial publication, this page included major candidates who had announced a run for president or an exploratory committee. The Post will contact additional candidates as they enter the race and include them here.

Curious about where candidates stand on another policy? Fill out this suggestion form.

Recent changes on this page

July 21 Included Sanders' support for abolishing the electoral college, following his tweet endorsing the idea.

July 8 Swalwell dropped out of presidential race.

June 21 Updated Gabbard’s position on lowering the voting age to 16 from “yes” to “open to it” based on a response from her campaign.

June 20 Updated O’Rourke’s position on packing the Supreme Court from “no” to “open to it.” Updated Gabbard’s position on eliminating the electoral college, which was previously “open to eliminating.” Added Bullock and de Blasio’s positions based on surveys returned from their campaigns. Added Gabbard’s position on packing the Supreme Court and Hickenlooper’s position on several issues.

June 17 Added Bennet's positions on Election Day holiday and Puerto Rico statehood.

June 17 Updated explanation for O'Rourke on Puerto Rico statehood.

June 11 Updated explanations for Buttigieg on voting rights and an Election Day holiday.

June 7 Added references to O'Rourke's voting rights plan, including an explanation of his Supreme Court term limit proposal.

May 14 Updated Moulton's stance on lowering the voting age, correcting an error in how he voted on an amendment. Also moved Booker to 'Open to it' on eliminating the filibuster and packing the Supreme Court based on a statement on the campaign trail.

May 9 Added Ryan positions based on survey returned from his campaign.

May 8 Added stances for four recent entrants (Bennet, Biden, Moulton and Ryan) based on public statements and legislative records.

May 6 Added Swalwell positions based on survey returned from his campaign.

April 11 Added Messam positions based on survey returned from his campaign.

April 5 Changed the following after additional information from Buttigieg's campaign: He is "open to" adding justices to the Supreme Court and supports voting rights for all formerly incarcerated people.

April 5 Adjusted Warren’s stance on the Senate filibuster after she announced that she supports eliminating it.

April 1 Updated with Klobuchar positions on the electoral college, eliminating the filibuster, statehood for Puerto Rico and voting for formerly incarcerated people.

April 1 Updated Gabbard's position on voting rights for formerly incarcerated people given additional information from her campaign.

April 1 Updated Warren's position on voting rights for previously incarcerated people after a clarification from the campaign. Also updated Williamson's position on eliminating the electoral college, a change sent from her campaign.

April 1 Page published.

Kevin Uhrmacher

Kevin Uhrmacher is a graphics editor for politics at The Washington Post. His work includes mapping trends in election results, analyzing data about President Trump’s political appointees and explaining the impact of congressional policies. He joined The Post in 2014 as a news designer.

Kevin Schaul

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

Jeff Stein

Jeff Stein is a policy reporter for The Washington Post. He was a crime reporter for the Syracuse Post-Standard and, in 2014, founded the local news nonprofit the Ithaca Voice in Upstate New York. He was also a reporter for Vox.

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