The Fix

“The picture coming out of it based on the reporting we’ve seen I would say is not a good one...”

Thune

“It's time for the Democrats to move on; 2016 is over. Hillary Clinton lost. Get over it.”

Cruz

“The picture coming out of it based on the reporting we’ve seen I would say is not a good one...”

Thune

“It's time for the Democrats to move on; 2016 is over. Hillary Clinton lost. Get over it.”

Cruz

“The picture coming out of it based on the reporting we’ve seen I would say is not a good one...”

Thune

“It's time for the Democrats to move on; 2016 is over. Hillary Clinton lost. Get over it.”

Cruz

Where Senate Republicans stand on impeaching Trump

If the House impeaches President Trump, the Senate will hold a trial to determine whether he should be removed from office. It would take 20 Republican senators along with all Democrats to reach the constitutionally mandated two-thirds majority, or 67 votes, to convict and remove him. That is a long shot, given Republicans in Congress have largely defended Trump in the face of allegations that he pressured Ukraine to perform investigations that would help him politically. All but three Republican senators recently signed onto a resolution declaring the House's impeachment inquiry "illegitimate."

0

Support impeachment inquiry

14

Have expressed concerns about what Trump did

38

Support Trump

Still, we know some Republicans are sweating behind the scenes about how to support Trump, given what we’ve learned so far and what might come next. Some have even publicly criticized him for pressuring a foreign government to get involved in U.S. politics. But there are far more Trump stalwarts than skeptics. Recently, a number of GOP senators have been avoiding comment by saying they want to be impartial jurors in the trial.

Just a juror

Susan Collins (Maine)

Up for reelection in 2020

“It’s important not to prejudge until we have the entire picture. ... I am amazed that some of my colleagues have already made up their minds one way or the other before all the evidence is in and before the facts are known.”

Oct. 23 »

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)

Retiring

“I’d be a juror, so I have no comment.”

Oct. 28 »

James E. Risch (Idaho)

Up for reelection in 2020

“I’m a juror and I’m comfortable not speaking.”

Oct. 28 »

Tim Scott (S.C.)

Up for reelection in 2022

“I don’t need a strategy for impeachment because I may be a juror someday.”

Oct. 28 »

Rick Scott (Fla.)

Up for reelection in 2024

“If it gets to the Senate, I will be a responsible juror. I will listen to all the facts presented by both sides and make a decision.”

Oct. 29 »

We’re tracking what Republican senators have said since the House impeachment inquiry launched. Below are the statements that indicate where each of them stands.

Where Republican senators stand

2020Up for reelection in 2020
RetiringRetiring after this term

Support impeachment inquiry 0

Have expressed concerns about what Trump did 14

Support Trump 38

Senators who have expressed support for the House’s impeachment inquiry

Senators who have, at some point, suggested or outright said that Trump’s actions were inappropriate

Senators who have expressed no issues with Trump’s alleged actions and responses to the Ukraine matter.

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)Retiring

He did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate but since has, calling the inquiry “one-sided, largely secret.” He has had mixed statements about the inquiry. He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 it is “inappropriate for the president to be talking with foreign governments about investigating his political opponents.” He say that with an election “right around the corner,” “impeachment would be a mistake.” The Washington Post reports he is “widely seen by his colleagues as driven by his personal integrity and therefore liable to vote against Trump if the case for his removal is strong.” Read more »

Roy Blunt (Mo.)

“... putting the facts together on the most recent House allegation is important — and then reaching conclusions" Read more »

Richard Burr (N.C.)

"I’m only focused on gathering the facts," Burr told The Washington Post on Sept. 25. Read more »

Susan Collins (Maine)2020

She has not signed the resolution calling the House’s prob illegitimate. But rather than criticize Trump, she is pioneering the political tactic of dodging questions about his conduct by pointing out she’ll be a juror in a future Senate trial. “It’s important not to prejudge until we have the entire picture,” she told Politico on Oct. 23. “I am amazed that some of my colleagues have already made up their minds one way or the other before all the evidence is in and before the facts are known,” she has also said. Read more »

Mike Crapo (Idaho)

"As to the question of impeachment, our entire legal system is dependent on our ability to find the truth. I will wait for further information regarding the facts of this matter and refrain from speculating on any outcomes of this discussion and process," Crapo said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Charles E. Grassley (Iowa)

"This person appears to have followed the whistleblower protection laws and ought to be heard out and protected. We should always work to respect whistleblowers’ requests for confidentiality," Grassley said in a statement on Oct. 1. Read more »

Johnny Isakson (Ga.)RetiringDec2019

He did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. A spokesperson told The Post he “was in the process of reviewing the resolution and talking with his colleagues, and he ultimately decided to cosign the resolution after careful consideration. He has said all along that wants to make sure he’s doing his part as a member of the Senate to ensure a fair process. He will continue to carefully monitor all the information available should the matter come before the Senate for consideration before his retirement on Dec. 31.”

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

She has not signed the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “Yes, absolutely it’s a concern. You don’t hold up foreign aid that we had previously appropriated for a political initiative. Period,” she said after the acting White House chief of staff acknowledged holding up military aid for political reasons. Read more »

Rob Portman (Ohio)

"I’ve been clear from the very start in saying I thought it was inappropriate for the president to ask a foreign government to investigate a political opponent," he told The Post on Oct. 29. Portman did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate, but that was because he was on a plane when it came out. A Portman spokesperson told the Daily Caller around the same time: “As he has said many times, Rob does not support the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry.” Read more »

Mitt Romney (Utah)

He has not signed the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “By all appearances, the President’s brazen and unprecedented appeal to China and to Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden is wrong and appalling,” he said Oct. 4. Read more »

Marco Rubio (Fla.)

"I don't think he should have done it," Rubio said on Sept. 24 of Trump asking for political help from Ukraine's president. Of the House's impeachment inquiry, he's warning his colleagues from jumping to conclusions about Trump's innocence or guilty: "It’s a mistake to take testimony until it’s all out there. Put it all together and view it in the full context of it," he told Politico Oct. 24. Read more »

Ben Sasse (Neb.)2020

"I’m glad the President agreed with the requests a number of us have been making that the administration release this unredacted transcript. The President should also provide all additional relevant materials to the Committee. At a time when foreign powers work every day to exploit our divisions, it’s important for public trust that Americans know what did and did not happen here. We need shared facts. As the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence fulfills its oversight responsibilities, this first release is the right choice for the country," Sasse said on Sept. 24. Read more »

John Thune (S.D.)

The senate’s No. 2 Republican has had some of the sharpest takeaways on the inquiry so far: “The picture coming out of it based on the reporting we’ve seen I would say is not a good one," he told reporters Oct. 23, "but I would say also, until we have a process that allows for everybody to see this in full transparency, it’s pretty hard to draw any hard-and-fast conclusions.” Read more »

Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.)

He has said Trump “exercised poor judgment” in the Ukraine call but based on what he’s seen so far, before the House’s impeachment inquiry really got underway, he didn’t see anything that rose to the level of impeachment. He has since signed onto the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “There is, I think, latitude in our system to have errors of judgment and inappropriate actions remedied through the political process. It’s called an election,” he told the Philadelphia Inquirer in early October. Read more »

John Barrasso (Wyo.)

"Democrats have been working to undermine President Donald Trump since day one," Barrasso said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.)

"From their perspective, yesterday’s announcement was the culmination of a three year witch hunt born of a grudge they’ve been holding against the President since their chosen candidate failed to win the 2016 election," Blackburn said on Sept. 25. Read more »

John Boozman (Ark.)

"Democrats have long sought to weaken the president, appease their base and further divide the country through impeachment," Boozman said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Mike Braun (Ind.)

"I’m not going to waste a lot of time and energy on the hypotheticals and particulars,” Braun told Breitbart News on Sept. 26. Read more »

Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.)2020

"Moving forward with an impeachment inquiry before that transcript is even public proves that House Democrats are more interested in partisan politics than in following the facts,” Capito said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Bill Cassidy (La.)2020

"Democrats started an impeachment process before they knew the facts. Nothing in the transcript supports Democrats’ accusation that there was a quid pro quo," Cassidy said in a statement on Sept. 25. Read more »

John Cornyn (Tex.)2020

“I have no doubt that if the facts were on their side, [Democrats] would allow this process to be in the open,” he said in an Oct. 16 statement. Read more »

Tom Cotton (Ark.)2020

"Despite an unprecedented act of transparency by the president in releasing the transcript of his call with a foreign leader, the Democrats nevertheless plunged headlong into their nonstop obsession with impeachment," Cotton said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Kevin Cramer (N.D.)

“The House should not present articles of impeachment without evidence to support such an awesome responsibility. So far they appear on a three-year fishing expedition,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Ted Cruz (Tex.)

"It's time for the Democrats to move on; 2016 is over. Hillary Clinton lost. Get over it," Cruz said on Oct. 1. Read more »

Steve Daines (Mont.)2020

He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 that Democrats are “obsessed with impeachment since before President Trump was even sworn into office.” Read more »

Joni Ernst (Iowa)2020

Ernst has refused to say whether the president asking Ukraine for help investigating the Bidens is right or wrong. "I haven’t seen all of the information," she said Oct. 17. She also signed onto the resolution calling the inquiry illegitimate. Read more »

Deb Fischer (Neb.)

"I read the full unredacted transcript of President Trump’s phone call with the Ukrainian president and, contrary what we were led to believe, there was no ‘smoking gun.’ The conversation was as the president portrayed it," Fischer said in a statement on Sept. 26. Read more »

Cory Gardner (Colo.)2020

Gardner refuses to say whether the president asking Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden is right or wrong. "It’s an answer that you get from a very serious investigation," he said, of the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into this. Yet he has criticized the House's impeachment inquiry as driven by the "far left." Read more »

Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.)2020

"From my point of view, to impeach any president over a phone call like this would be insane,” Graham said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Josh Hawley (Mo.)

"Democrats didn’t like the result of the 2016 election so they have chosen to tear apart our democracy to advance their liberal goals," Hawley wrote in a fundraising email to supporters on Sept. 24. Read more »

John Hoeven (N.D.)

"I believe that there’s not grounds there for impeachment and we should focus on getting the work done that serves the American people," Hoeven said on Oct. 1. Read more »

Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.)2020

"This is how they operate. Verdict first, trial later. Break the rules. Ignore due process. And fairness be damned," Hyde-Smith tweeted on Oct. 4. On Oct. 22 she told the Daily Caller she "does not support impeachment." Read more »

James M. Inhofe (Okla.)2020

He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 he had ruled out voting for Trump's impeachment "at this time." Read more »

Ron Johnson (Wis.)

"I look at that transcript and I go, it's Trump being Trump," Johnson said on Oct. 3. Read more »

John Neely Kennedy (La.)

"I think some of my Democratic friends are acting in good faith -- I don't have enough facts to agree with them," Kennedy said on Sept. 24. Read more »

James Lankford (Okla.)

"I think they’ve been looking for a way to impeach the president for years. I think they’re upset with him politically," Lankford said on Oct. 4. Read more »

Mike Lee (Utah)

"There are those who don’t like this president who have been trying to have him impeached and removed since the day he took office,” Lee said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Mitch McConnell (Ky.)2020

McConnell on Sept. 30 said the Senate would be "required" to take up impeachment if the House passed an article of impeachment. Read more »

Martha McSally (Ariz.)2020

“When we’re talking about impeaching the president of the United States, it has got to be a process that is something that the American people trust,” McSally said at a stop in Peoria. She charged the House leadership with acting out of political motives, while “the Senate Intelligence Committee has been authorized by every senator to actually look into this topic.” Read more »

Jerry Moran (Kan.)

“Since President Trump’s election, Democrats have been trying to delegitimize his presidency, and if unfounded, impeachment of President Trump would only further fracture our already divided country,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Rand Paul (Ky.)

"Ever since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 presidential election, Democrats have been on a mission to reverse those results, even though it’s meant dragging the country through one desperate witch hunt after another." Read more »

David Perdue (Ga.)2020

"They’ve weaponized politics here. They have obstructed this president since day one. They just can’t get over that he won the election, and so I just see this as premature," Perdue said on Sept. 24. Read more »

James E. Risch (Idaho)2020

"The House is free to conduct their inquiry, and when they are done, the Senate will take up their Constitutional duty to do the same. From what I know to this point, the Democratic members in the House haven’t shown us anything that meets the standard and are prioritizing politics over facts," Risch said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Pat Roberts (Kan.)Retiring

Roberts called the impeachment inquiry "political theater" on Oct. 2. Read more »

Mike Rounds (S.D.)2020

"I don’t think it’s the smoking gun that Democrats wanted in the House,” Rounds said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Rick Scott (Fla.)

“I’ve read the transcript and I don’t see anything in the transcript. No one showed me that there’s a violation of the law,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Tim Scott (S.C.)

"I don’t need a strategy for impeachment because I may be a juror someday," he told The Post on Oct. 28. He's also derided the whistleblower complaint as "heresay." Read more »

Richard C. Shelby (Ala.)

"I was here before when the House impeached [President Bill] Clinton, and . . . it becomes the order of the day,” Shelby said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Dan Sullivan (Alaska)2020

“To be honest, I don’t follow any of it because that’s not due process. Secret hearings, selective leaks. And that’s due process? In my America, that’s not due process,” he told The Washington Post on Oct. 28. Read more »

Thom Tillis (N.C.)2020

"Senator Tillis has reviewed the transcript and the complaint and strongly believes there is zero-basis to even entertain the impeachment of the President.” a Tillis spokesperson told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Roger Wicker (Miss.)

"The political left has made a bad habit of drawing conclusions about President Trump without knowing all of the facts. It appears they have done so again. The transcript of the President’s phone call provides no evidence of wrongdoing," Wicker said on Sept. 25. On Oct. 22 he told the Daily Caller he "does not support impeachment." Read more »

Todd C. Young (Ind.)

"One thing is clear, the far-left has been desperate to get rid of President Trump since day one. That much has not changed. I take all of my responsibilities very seriously and will continue to evaluate the facts as we get them, but my primary focus will remain on the work Hoosiers elected me to do, including passing USMCA, reining in health care costs, taking care of veterans, keeping Americans safe and secure, and continuing to grow our economy," Young said in a statement to The Washington Post on Oct. 7.

Support impeachment inquiry 0

Have expressed concerns about what Trump did 14

Support Trump 38

Scroll to see a full list of names

Support impeachment inquiry 0

Senators who have expressed support for the House’s impeachment inquiry

Have expressed concerns about what Trump did 14

Senators who have, at some point, suggested or outright said that Trump’s actions were inappropriate

Lamar Alexander (Tenn.)Retiring

He did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate but since has, calling the inquiry “one-sided, largely secret.” He has had mixed statements about the inquiry. He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 it is “inappropriate for the president to be talking with foreign governments about investigating his political opponents.” He say that with an election “right around the corner,” “impeachment would be a mistake.” The Washington Post reports he is “widely seen by his colleagues as driven by his personal integrity and therefore liable to vote against Trump if the case for his removal is strong.” Read more »

Roy Blunt (Mo.)

“... putting the facts together on the most recent House allegation is important — and then reaching conclusions" Read more »

Richard Burr (N.C.)

"I’m only focused on gathering the facts," Burr told The Washington Post on Sept. 25. Read more »

Susan Collins (Maine)2020

She has not signed the resolution calling the House’s prob illegitimate. But rather than criticize Trump, she is pioneering the political tactic of dodging questions about his conduct by pointing out she’ll be a juror in a future Senate trial. “It’s important not to prejudge until we have the entire picture,” she told Politico on Oct. 23. “I am amazed that some of my colleagues have already made up their minds one way or the other before all the evidence is in and before the facts are known,” she has also said. Read more »

Mike Crapo (Idaho)

"As to the question of impeachment, our entire legal system is dependent on our ability to find the truth. I will wait for further information regarding the facts of this matter and refrain from speculating on any outcomes of this discussion and process," Crapo said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Charles E. Grassley (Iowa)

"This person appears to have followed the whistleblower protection laws and ought to be heard out and protected. We should always work to respect whistleblowers’ requests for confidentiality," Grassley said in a statement on Oct. 1. Read more »

Johnny Isakson (Ga.)RetiringDec2019

He did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. A spokesperson told The Post he “was in the process of reviewing the resolution and talking with his colleagues, and he ultimately decided to cosign the resolution after careful consideration. He has said all along that wants to make sure he’s doing his part as a member of the Senate to ensure a fair process. He will continue to carefully monitor all the information available should the matter come before the Senate for consideration before his retirement on Dec. 31.”

Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

She has not signed the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “Yes, absolutely it’s a concern. You don’t hold up foreign aid that we had previously appropriated for a political initiative. Period,” she said after the acting White House chief of staff acknowledged holding up military aid for political reasons. Read more »

Rob Portman (Ohio)

"I’ve been clear from the very start in saying I thought it was inappropriate for the president to ask a foreign government to investigate a political opponent," he told The Post on Oct. 29. Portman did not initially sign the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate, but that was because he was on a plane when it came out. A Portman spokesperson told the Daily Caller around the same time: “As he has said many times, Rob does not support the House Democrats’ impeachment inquiry.” Read more »

Mitt Romney (Utah)

He has not signed the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “By all appearances, the President’s brazen and unprecedented appeal to China and to Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden is wrong and appalling,” he said Oct. 4. Read more »

Marco Rubio (Fla.)

"I don't think he should have done it," Rubio said on Sept. 24 of Trump asking for political help from Ukraine's president. Of the House's impeachment inquiry, he's warning his colleagues from jumping to conclusions about Trump's innocence or guilty: "It’s a mistake to take testimony until it’s all out there. Put it all together and view it in the full context of it," he told Politico Oct. 24. Read more »

Ben Sasse (Neb.)2020

"I’m glad the President agreed with the requests a number of us have been making that the administration release this unredacted transcript. The President should also provide all additional relevant materials to the Committee. At a time when foreign powers work every day to exploit our divisions, it’s important for public trust that Americans know what did and did not happen here. We need shared facts. As the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence fulfills its oversight responsibilities, this first release is the right choice for the country," Sasse said on Sept. 24. Read more »

John Thune (S.D.)

The senate’s No. 2 Republican has had some of the sharpest takeaways on the inquiry so far: “The picture coming out of it based on the reporting we’ve seen I would say is not a good one," he told reporters Oct. 23, "but I would say also, until we have a process that allows for everybody to see this in full transparency, it’s pretty hard to draw any hard-and-fast conclusions.” Read more »

Patrick J. Toomey (Pa.)

He has said Trump “exercised poor judgment” in the Ukraine call but based on what he’s seen so far, before the House’s impeachment inquiry really got underway, he didn’t see anything that rose to the level of impeachment. He has since signed onto the resolution calling the House’s probe illegitimate. “There is, I think, latitude in our system to have errors of judgment and inappropriate actions remedied through the political process. It’s called an election,” he told the Philadelphia Inquirer in early October. Read more »

Support Trump 38

Senators who have expressed no issues with Trump’s alleged actions and responses to the Ukraine matter.

John Barrasso (Wyo.)

"Democrats have been working to undermine President Donald Trump since day one," Barrasso said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Marsha Blackburn (Tenn.)

"From their perspective, yesterday’s announcement was the culmination of a three year witch hunt born of a grudge they’ve been holding against the President since their chosen candidate failed to win the 2016 election," Blackburn said on Sept. 25. Read more »

John Boozman (Ark.)

"Democrats have long sought to weaken the president, appease their base and further divide the country through impeachment," Boozman said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Mike Braun (Ind.)

"I’m not going to waste a lot of time and energy on the hypotheticals and particulars,” Braun told Breitbart News on Sept. 26. Read more »

Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.)2020

"Moving forward with an impeachment inquiry before that transcript is even public proves that House Democrats are more interested in partisan politics than in following the facts,” Capito said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Bill Cassidy (La.)2020

"Democrats started an impeachment process before they knew the facts. Nothing in the transcript supports Democrats’ accusation that there was a quid pro quo," Cassidy said in a statement on Sept. 25. Read more »

John Cornyn (Tex.)2020

“I have no doubt that if the facts were on their side, [Democrats] would allow this process to be in the open,” he said in an Oct. 16 statement. Read more »

Tom Cotton (Ark.)2020

"Despite an unprecedented act of transparency by the president in releasing the transcript of his call with a foreign leader, the Democrats nevertheless plunged headlong into their nonstop obsession with impeachment," Cotton said in a statement on Sept. 24. Read more »

Kevin Cramer (N.D.)

“The House should not present articles of impeachment without evidence to support such an awesome responsibility. So far they appear on a three-year fishing expedition,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Ted Cruz (Tex.)

"It's time for the Democrats to move on; 2016 is over. Hillary Clinton lost. Get over it," Cruz said on Oct. 1. Read more »

Steve Daines (Mont.)2020

He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 that Democrats are “obsessed with impeachment since before President Trump was even sworn into office.” Read more »

Joni Ernst (Iowa)2020

Ernst has refused to say whether the president asking Ukraine for help investigating the Bidens is right or wrong. "I haven’t seen all of the information," she said Oct. 17. She also signed onto the resolution calling the inquiry illegitimate. Read more »

Deb Fischer (Neb.)

"I read the full unredacted transcript of President Trump’s phone call with the Ukrainian president and, contrary what we were led to believe, there was no ‘smoking gun.’ The conversation was as the president portrayed it," Fischer said in a statement on Sept. 26. Read more »

Cory Gardner (Colo.)2020

Gardner refuses to say whether the president asking Ukraine to investigate Joe Biden is right or wrong. "It’s an answer that you get from a very serious investigation," he said, of the Senate Intelligence Committee's investigation into this. Yet he has criticized the House's impeachment inquiry as driven by the "far left." Read more »

Lindsey O. Graham (S.C.)2020

"From my point of view, to impeach any president over a phone call like this would be insane,” Graham said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Josh Hawley (Mo.)

"Democrats didn’t like the result of the 2016 election so they have chosen to tear apart our democracy to advance their liberal goals," Hawley wrote in a fundraising email to supporters on Sept. 24. Read more »

John Hoeven (N.D.)

"I believe that there’s not grounds there for impeachment and we should focus on getting the work done that serves the American people," Hoeven said on Oct. 1. Read more »

Cindy Hyde-Smith (Miss.)2020

"This is how they operate. Verdict first, trial later. Break the rules. Ignore due process. And fairness be damned," Hyde-Smith tweeted on Oct. 4. On Oct. 22 she told the Daily Caller she "does not support impeachment." Read more »

James M. Inhofe (Okla.)2020

He told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22 he had ruled out voting for Trump's impeachment "at this time." Read more »

Ron Johnson (Wis.)

"I look at that transcript and I go, it's Trump being Trump," Johnson said on Oct. 3. Read more »

John Neely Kennedy (La.)

"I think some of my Democratic friends are acting in good faith -- I don't have enough facts to agree with them," Kennedy said on Sept. 24. Read more »

James Lankford (Okla.)

"I think they’ve been looking for a way to impeach the president for years. I think they’re upset with him politically," Lankford said on Oct. 4. Read more »

Mike Lee (Utah)

"There are those who don’t like this president who have been trying to have him impeached and removed since the day he took office,” Lee said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Mitch McConnell (Ky.)2020

McConnell on Sept. 30 said the Senate would be "required" to take up impeachment if the House passed an article of impeachment. Read more »

Martha McSally (Ariz.)2020

“When we’re talking about impeaching the president of the United States, it has got to be a process that is something that the American people trust,” McSally said at a stop in Peoria. She charged the House leadership with acting out of political motives, while “the Senate Intelligence Committee has been authorized by every senator to actually look into this topic.” Read more »

Jerry Moran (Kan.)

“Since President Trump’s election, Democrats have been trying to delegitimize his presidency, and if unfounded, impeachment of President Trump would only further fracture our already divided country,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Rand Paul (Ky.)

"Ever since Donald Trump was declared the winner of the 2016 presidential election, Democrats have been on a mission to reverse those results, even though it’s meant dragging the country through one desperate witch hunt after another." Read more »

David Perdue (Ga.)2020

"They’ve weaponized politics here. They have obstructed this president since day one. They just can’t get over that he won the election, and so I just see this as premature," Perdue said on Sept. 24. Read more »

James E. Risch (Idaho)2020

"The House is free to conduct their inquiry, and when they are done, the Senate will take up their Constitutional duty to do the same. From what I know to this point, the Democratic members in the House haven’t shown us anything that meets the standard and are prioritizing politics over facts," Risch said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Pat Roberts (Kan.)Retiring

Roberts called the impeachment inquiry "political theater" on Oct. 2. Read more »

Mike Rounds (S.D.)2020

"I don’t think it’s the smoking gun that Democrats wanted in the House,” Rounds said on Sept. 25. Read more »

Rick Scott (Fla.)

“I’ve read the transcript and I don’t see anything in the transcript. No one showed me that there’s a violation of the law,” he told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Tim Scott (S.C.)

"I don’t need a strategy for impeachment because I may be a juror someday," he told The Post on Oct. 28. He's also derided the whistleblower complaint as "heresay." Read more »

Richard C. Shelby (Ala.)

"I was here before when the House impeached [President Bill] Clinton, and . . . it becomes the order of the day,” Shelby said on Sept. 24. Read more »

Dan Sullivan (Alaska)2020

“To be honest, I don’t follow any of it because that’s not due process. Secret hearings, selective leaks. And that’s due process? In my America, that’s not due process,” he told The Washington Post on Oct. 28. Read more »

Thom Tillis (N.C.)2020

"Senator Tillis has reviewed the transcript and the complaint and strongly believes there is zero-basis to even entertain the impeachment of the President.” a Tillis spokesperson told the Daily Caller on Oct. 22. Read more »

Roger Wicker (Miss.)

"The political left has made a bad habit of drawing conclusions about President Trump without knowing all of the facts. It appears they have done so again. The transcript of the President’s phone call provides no evidence of wrongdoing," Wicker said on Sept. 25. On Oct. 22 he told the Daily Caller he "does not support impeachment." Read more »

Todd C. Young (Ind.)

"One thing is clear, the far-left has been desperate to get rid of President Trump since day one. That much has not changed. I take all of my responsibilities very seriously and will continue to evaluate the facts as we get them, but my primary focus will remain on the work Hoosiers elected me to do, including passing USMCA, reining in health care costs, taking care of veterans, keeping Americans safe and secure, and continuing to grow our economy," Young said in a statement to The Washington Post on Oct. 7.

Amber Phillips

Amber Phillips writes about politics for The Fix. She was previously the one-woman D.C. bureau for the Las Vegas Sun and has reported from Boston and Taiwan.

Kevin Schaul

Kevin Schaul is a senior graphics editor for The Washington Post. He covers national politics and public policy using data and visuals.

Adrian Blanco

Adrian Blanco is an intern in the Graphics department at The Washington Post. He previously worked at Spanish newspaper El Confidencial focusing on data visualization, data analysis and investigative journalism and participating in the ICIJ’s Paradise Papers investigation.

Kate Rabinowitz

Kate Rabinowitz is a graphics reporter at The Washington Post. She previously worked at Propublica. She joined The Post in 2018.

JM Rieger

JM Rieger is the video editor for The Fix, covering national politics. He joined The Washington Post in 2018. Previously, Rieger worked as a video producer covering national politics for HuffPost. He began his career as a video editor covering Congress for Roll Call.

Natalie Jennings and Kevin Uhrmacher contributed to this report.

This story previously included GOP Senate reactions to issues including whistleblower credibility, troop withdrawal from Syria and Trump asking China to investigate Biden. They have been removed as the story develops.

About this story

Stances are sourced from lawmaker statements and news reports. Did we miss something? Let us know!

Legislator images via Government Printing Office.

Originally published Oct. 9, 2019.

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