Hassan Rouhani

Hassan Rouhani, president of Iran

Existing nuclear stockpiles

During negotiations

In 2013, Rouhani declared the removal of current stocks of enriched uranium a “red line” he would not cross.

Read in the Financial Times

In the agreement

The deal requires Iran to reduce its stockpile of enriched uranium from 10,000 kilograms to 300 kilograms.

Dismantling of nuclear facilities

During negotiations

Rouhani also insisted in a 2013 interview that no Iranian nuclear facilities should be dismantled.

Read in the Financial Times

In the agreement

Iran’s three facilities will remain open, but the Fordow enrichment facility would be converted to a research center and the Arak reactor would be redesigned so it could not produce weapons-grade plutonium. The word “dismantle” does not appear in the agreement.

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei

Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, Iran’s supreme leader

Immediacy of sanctions relief

During negotiations

Khamenei (and other Iranian leaders) had repeatedly insisted that all economic sanctions must be lifted on the day any final deal was agreed to.

Read in the New York Times

In the agreement

None of the United Nations, European or U.S. sanctions will be lifted immediately, but await international verification of Iranian compliance.

Separately from this deal, the United States will continue to maintain a trade embargo and to sanction Iran for support of terrorism, human rights abuses and missile activities.

Comprehensive inspections

During negotiations

Khamenei declared in April that Iranian military sites would be off limits to international inspectors in an agreeable deal.

Read in the New York Times

In the agreement

The International Atomic Energy Agency will be allowed to inspect all facilities. Disputes over access are submitted in an agreed resolution process. If Iran does not comply with the agency’s decisions, sanctions can be reimposed.

Barack Obama

President Obama

How badly a deal is needed

During negotiations

During negotiations, the Obama administration repeatedly used the phrase, “No deal is better than a bad deal.”

Read White House press release

Speaking about the agreement

In remarks about the deal Tuesday morning, Obama said, “No deal means a greater chance of war in the Middle East,” marking a pivot toward selling the deal to Congress.

John Kerry

John F. Kerry, U.S. secretary of state

Disclosure of past nuclear activity

During negotiations

Kerry firmly stated after the framework agreement was released that the deal must require Iran to disclose its past military-related nuclear activity.

Watch the interview on PBS

In the agreement

Iran has made a separate agreement with the IAEA, required in the nuclear deal, to resolve outstanding questions about past activities.