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To slow the spread of the novel coronavirus and reinforce the physical distancing guidance that health experts say is one of our best lines of defense, almost all U.S. states are under a stay-at-home order. In states that haven’t issued sweeping directives, some individual counties and cities have instituted their own measures.

Most states allow residents to leave their homes to shop for groceries and other essentials, to exercise outdoors, to go to the doctor and to pick up prescriptions. But each state has its own list of do’s and don’ts.

Click on a state below to jump to its stay-at-home order for more information about the rules, curfews and potential end dates.

Alabama

  • Rules: People can still leave their homes to obtain supplies for family, household members and pets. Restaurants are still open for delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, liquor stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that may remain open. On April 28, the governor issued a safer-at-home order beginning April 30, which will expire May 15. The order will allow many businesses and retail stores to open, provided physical distancing and sanitation rules are followed. Beaches will reopen, but people must maintain six feet of distance, and gatherings of more than 10 people are not allowed. Restaurants and bars are still limited to takeout, curbside pickup or delivery under the order.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Alabama.
  • Start date: April 4.
  • End date: April 30.

Alaska

  • Rules: People may still go outside but must remain at least six feet away from other individuals not in their households. Restaurants may be open for delivery, drive-through or takeout. Playgrounds and parks may still be open. Grocery stores, gas stations, banks and pharmacies are among the essential businesses still open. In an April 22 order, the governor announced the state would begin reopening businesses on April 24, while still mandating physical distancing.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Alaska.
  • Start date: March 28
  • End date: Initially April 11. Extended to April 21.

Arizona

  • Rules: People can leave their homes for essential activities, such as obtaining necessary supplies and services for family, household members and pets. Restaurants are still open for delivery or takeout. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. In an April 22 order, the governor announced that elective surgeries could resume May 1. In an April 29 order, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while also allowing retail businesses to begin selling goods May 4, with certain restrictions. Cosmetologists and barbers can resume appointment-based services May 8, while restaurants and coffee shops can resume dine-in services May 11, with certain restrictions.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Arizona.
  • Start date: March 31.
  • End date: April 30. Extended to May 15.

Arkansas

No statewide stay-at-home order. On April 18, the governor announced an economic recovery task force and said he hoped to ease restrictions in the state beginning May 4. Barbershops, salons, spas and massage therapists are among the businesses that may reopen beginning May 6, with some restrictions. Restaurants can reopen for dine-in service at 33 percent capacity beginning May 11.

California

  • Rules: People can leave their homes to get food and care for relatives or friends. Restaurants are open for delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that are open. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On May 4, the governor announced that some “lower-risk workplaces with adaptations,” including bookstores, florists and clothing stores, would be allowed to reopen May 8, with some restrictions.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in California.
  • Start date: March 19.
  • End date: No set date.

Colorado

  • Rules: People can leave their homes only for necessary activities such as grocery shopping, exercise or taking care of family members. Restaurants and bars are open for delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, firearm stores, marijuana dispensaries and gas stations are among the businesses considered critical retail. State parks are open, but playgrounds and picnic areas are closed. On April 20, the governor announced that the state will shift from a stay-at-home order to a safer-at-home order. Some personal service providers, such as medical and dental offices, can reopen April 27, as long as physical distancing is maintained. Retail stores may begin reopening May 1 and larger business offices May 4 at 50 percent capacity.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Colorado.
  • Start date: March 26.
  • End date: Initially April 11. Extended to April 26.

Connecticut

  • Rules: Grocery stores, pharmacies, banks, liquor stores and gas stations are among the essential businesses that are open. Restaurants are open for delivery or takeout. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but public parks are open.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Connecticut.
  • Start date: March 23.
  • End date: Initially April 22. Extended to May 20.

Delaware

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for delivery or takeout. All beaches are closed except for people exercising or walking their dogs.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Delaware.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: May 15.

District of Columbia

  • Rules: People are allowed to leave home for food, medicine or medical care. Banks, liquor stores, gas stations and laundromats are also open. An April 8 order requires farmers markets and fish markets to close unless they receive permission from the city government to reopen with new restrictions, and bans playing golf and tennis. Essential businesses such as grocery stores and banks must post signs outside instructing customers to wear a mask or face covering and to stay six feet from one another. The order reversed the closure of apartment rooftop and courtyard spaces, provided that people only visit these places with family members and while keeping their distance from others. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. An April 15 order requires people to wear masks or face coverings at hotels, during taxi and ride-share trips, and when selling food.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place.
  • Start date: April 1.
  • End date: Initially April 24. Extended to May 15.

Florida

  • Rules: Residents have to stay indoors unless they are conducting essential activities such as buying food, medicine and gas, visiting doctors, exercising outdoors or commuting to jobs deemed essential. They can go fishing. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses open. On April 29, the governor outlined Florida’s recovery plan, which begins May 4 with a measured approach. Visits to senior-living facilities are still prohibited and schools — nearing the end of the academic year — will continue with distance learning. Retail stores and restaurants will reopen to operate at 25 percent of indoor capacity throughout the state except in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Florida.
  • Start date: April 2.
  • End date: April 30.

Georgia

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for takeout, curbside pickup or delivery. K-12 schools are canceled through the rest of the academic year. Gyms are closed, but people can go outside to exercise as long as six feet of physical distancing is maintained. On April 20, the governor announced plans to ease restrictions and said some indoor facilities such as gyms and salons will be allowed to reopen April 24, as long as they comply with social distancing guidelines and other safety rules.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Georgia.
  • Start date: April 3.
  • End date: Initially April 13. Extended to April 30.

Hawaii

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for drive-through, delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that are open. People can go to the beach for exercise such as swimming or surfing.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Hawaii.
  • Start date: March 25.
  • End date: Initially April 30. Extended to May 31.

Idaho

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for drive-through, delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that are open. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 23, the governor announced a four-stage plan to reopen the state beginning May 1, as long as certain criteria are met.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Idaho.
  • Start date: March 25.
  • End date: Initially April 15. Extended to April 30.

Illinois

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that are open. Public parks remain open, but playgrounds are closed. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 23, the governor announced an extension to the stay-at-home order, while allowing retail stores to open for pickup and delivery beginning May 1.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Illinois.
  • Start date: March 21.
  • End date: Initially April 7. Extended to May 30.

Indiana

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. Restaurants are open for delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and pharmacies are among the essential businesses that are open. State parks remain open, but playgrounds are closed. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On May 1, the governor announced a five-stage plan to reopen the state. Most of the state will enter the second stage May 4, which will allow retail businesses to open at 50 percent capacity. On May 11, restaurants and bars can open at 50 percent capacity, but bar seating will remain closed.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Indiana.
  • Start date: March 24
  • End date: Initially April 6. Extended to May 1.

Iowa

No statewide stay-at-home order. Seventy-seven of Iowa’s 99 counties that haven’t had coronavirus cases or have seen a downward trend in infections over the past two weeks can begin operating again with limited capacity starting May 1.

Kansas

  • Rules: People can go out to get food, medicine and other household necessities. They must maintain a social distance of at least six feet from other people, and gatherings are limited to 10 people. On April 30, the governor announced a multiphase plan to reopen the state as early as May 4.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Kansas.
  • Start date: March 30.
  • End date: Initially April 19. Extended to May 3.

Kentucky

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. They must maintain a social distance of at least six feet from other people. Restaurants are open for drive-through, delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and liquor stores are among the businesses that are open. Gyms and fitness centers are closed, but exercising outdoors is permitted as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 23, the governor announced that the state will begin its first phase of reopening April 27, allowing non-urgent health-care services to resume operation. On April 29, the governor announced the state’s tentative plan to begin reopening businesses. Manufacturing companies can resume work and horse-racing events can start again without fans on May 11, while churches can open their doors for services on May 20.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Kentucky.
  • Start date: March 26
  • End date: Not known.

Louisiana

  • Rules: People can go out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Takeout food orders are allowed. Public gatherings are limited to 10 people. Banks, gas stations and veterinary services are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. Playgrounds are closed. On April 27, the governor extended the order to May 15, with several tweaks, including that restaurant patrons are now being allowed to eat their takeout food in outdoor seating areas as long as no employees serve them.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Louisiana.
  • Start date: March 23.
  • End date: Initially April 13. Extended to May 15.

Maine

  • Rules: People can go out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Banks, gas stations, laundromats, veterinary services and other essential businesses are open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. People who come from other states are urged to self-quarantine for 14 days. Schools must continue remote learning until at least May 1. On April 23, the governor outlined a plan for a “phased-in” reopening of the state’s economy. On April 28, the governor announced a new “Stay Safer at Home” order, which will continue to have people stay home through May 31. The order also allows residents to visit businesses deemed safe to open under Stage 1 of the state’s reopening plan, which includes barber shops, hair salons and pet grooming.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Maine.
  • Start date: April 2.
  • End date: Initially April 30. Extended to May 31 through a new order.

Maryland

  • Rules: People are allowed to leave home for food, medicine or medical care. Restaurants can continue selling food “on a carryout or drive-through basis.” Banks, liquor stores, gas stations and laundromats are also open. Recreational boating is not an acceptable outdoor activity. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 15, the governor ordered residents to wear masks when they go out to stores. On April 24, the governor announced a three-tiered plan to reopen society but said it would begin only when data shows that the virus’s spread is under control and the health system is prepared for any future spike in infections.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Maryland.
  • Start date: March 30
  • End date: Until terminated by the governor.

Massachusetts

  • Rules: People can go out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Takeout and delivery food orders are still allowed. Medical marijuana shops are open, but recreational marijuana shops are closed. Banks, liquor stores, gas stations and pharmacies are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Massachusetts.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: Initially April 7. Extended to May 18.

Michigan

  • Rules: People can leave their homes for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Takeout food orders are allowed. Banks, gas stations, laundromats and veterinary services are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. All public and private gatherings of any size outside of a family home are banned. The governor implemented additional restrictions for stores April 9, specifying limits on the number of customers allowed in a store at one time based on floor space. The governor introduced a plan at an April 27 briefing to start reopening the state’s businesses, which she said would be done at an “incremental” pace. Construction businesses may resume operations on May 7. On May 1, the governor signed a new executive order, which extend various business closures and the emergency declaration to May 28.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Michigan.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: Initially April 13. Extended to May 15.

Minnesota

  • Rules: People can leave their homes to pick up essential items such as groceries or food, prescriptions, and gas; to relocate for safety reasons; or go to work if their job is deemed in an essential sector. Stores providing essential supplies, such as grocery stores, will remain open. Bars and restaurants can deliver food and provide curbside takeout. Schools are closed until May 4. On April 23, the governor issued an order that allows workers in industrial and office settings — specifically those who cannot work from home — to begin returning to work April 27 subject to several conditions. On April 30, the governor announced an extension of Minnesota’s stay-at-home orders while loosening some restrictions so some retailers could reopen in a limited capacity. Retailers can reopen for curbside pickup and delivery.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Minnesota.
  • Start date: March 27.
  • End date: Initially April 10. Extended to May 18.

Mississippi

  • Rules: People can get groceries, medicine and other essentials. Restaurants can also remain open for drive-through, takeout or delivery. Gyms, health clubs and parks (not including walking trails) are closed. Social gatherings of more than 10 people are not allowed. On April 24, the governor signed a “safer at home” order, lasting from April 27 to May 11, to begin reopening the economy. Under the order, retail stores can reopen as long as they limit customers in the store to less than 50 percent of the store’s capacity.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Mississippi.
  • Start date: April 3.
  • End date: Initially April 20. Extended to April 27.

Missouri

  • Rules: People can go out for necessities such as groceries and medicine. Restaurants may be open for takeout, delivery or drive-through orders. Playgrounds are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 27, the governor announced the first phase of the state’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” plan, which will begin reopening the state’s economy May 4. Retail stores will be able to reopen, but must limit the number of customers based on the building’s square footage. Restaurants will be able to reopen their dining rooms, along with other businesses such as barber shops, as long as physical distancing requirements are met.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Missouri.
  • Start date: April 6.
  • End date: Initially April 24. Extended to May 3.

Montana

  • Rules: People can get groceries, medicine and other essentials. Takeout food orders are allowed, and playgrounds are open. Banks, gas stations, laundromats and veterinary services are open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. Public parks and public lands will remain open. In an April 22 order, the governor announced a plan to begin a phased reopening of the state, with the stay-at-home order expiring on April 26 for people and April 27 for businesses, including retail stores as long as they maintain physical distance and adhere to requirements to limit capacity. Restaurants and bars may begin providing some in-establishment services May 4. Movie theaters, gyms and other businesses that cannot ensure physical distancing remain closed
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Montana.
  • Start date: March 28.
  • End date: Initially April 10. Extended to April 24.

Nebraska

No statewide stay-at-home order. On April 24, the governor announced that restrictions on social gathering and business operations would be eased. Some businesses, including restaurants, may reopen May 4 in certain districts, but must limit seating to 50 percent of the occupancy maximum. Bars and movie theaters are among the businesses that must remain closed until at least May 31.

Nevada

  • Rules: People can venture out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. Restaurants can also remain open for takeout or delivery. Grocery stores, gas stations and convenience stores are among the retail businesses that can stay open. In an April 29 order, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while easing some restrictions beginning May 1. All retail businesses can now operate with curbside pickup. Restrictions on outdoor activities, including golf and tennis, were also relaxed.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Nevada.
  • Start date: April 1.
  • End date: April 30. Extended to May 15.

New Hampshire

  • Rules: People can leave their homes to get fresh air or exercise, provided physical distancing protocols are maintained. Essential errands such as going to the grocery store, pharmacy or laundromat are allowed. All state beaches along the Seacoast are closed. On April 21, the governor announced a task force that will develop a plan to reopen the economy in several phases. On May 1, the governor announced a modified stay-at-home order in effect until May 31. Under the new order, certain businesses such as golf courses, retail stores and salons can open May 11 with certain occupancy and physical distancing restrictions. Restaurants can open outdoor seating areas May 18 with some additional restrictions.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in New Hampshire.
  • Start date: March 27.
  • End date: May 4.

New Jersey

  • Rules: People can venture out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Restaurants, bars and liquor stores can also remain open for takeout or delivery. Grocery stores, medical marijuana dispensaries, gas stations and convenience stores are among the retail businesses that can stay open. State and county parks are closed. On April 27, the governor announced that the state will not begin reopening its economy until officials detect a 14-day trend of “appreciable and sustained” drops in new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations. On April 29, the governor issued an order to reopen state parks and golf courses beginning May 2.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in New Jersey.
  • Start date: March 21
  • End date: Until the governor revokes or modifies.

New Mexico

  • Rules: People can go out for a jog or walk their dog, but not in a group and as quickly as possible. Gas stations, hardware stores, banks, laundromats and other businesses deemed essential are open. Restaurants, breweries and distilleries are open, but only for delivery or carryout. The governor extended the order April 6, adding further restrictions, including limiting maximum occupancy in retail stores that qualify as essential businesses such as grocery stores. These stores cannot exceed 20 percent of the occupancy limit as determined by the fire marshal.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in New Mexico.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: Initially April 10. Extended to May 15.

New York

Statewide order: “New York State on PAUSE

  • Rules: People can leave their homes for groceries, medicine and exercise. All nonessential businesses are closed. Grocery stores, liquor stores, convenience stores, banks and gas stations are among the businesses that could be considered essential. The governor extended the order April 6 and increased the maximum fine for violating the state’s physical distancing policy from $500 to $1,000. On April 27, the governor said some parts of New York state will “unpause” May 15 as the first phase of a reopening plan. Schools will remain closed for the rest of the academic year with students expected to continue distance learning for the final two months of the semester.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in New York.
  • Start date: March 22
  • End date: Initially April 15. Extended to May 15.

North Carolina

  • Rules: People can go out to get groceries, exercise, take care of others and perform other essential activities. They must maintain a social distance of at least six feet from other people. Restaurants are open for drive-through, delivery or takeout. Grocery stores, gas stations and liquor stores are among the businesses that are open.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in North Carolina.
  • Start date: March 30
  • End date: Initially April 29. Extended to May 8.

North Dakota

No statewide stay-at-home order. On April 27, the governor announced that many of the closed businesses — including bars, restaurants, theaters and salons — will be allowed to reopen May 1 “if current favorable trends hold.”

Ohio

  • Rules: People can leave their homes for essential needs such as medical care, going to work if your job is deemed essential, caring for relatives or going to the grocery store. Playgrounds are closed, but parks remain open. Day-care centers will remain open but will be required to obtain and operate under a temporary pandemic license, with a maximum of six children allowed per room. Beginning May 1, the state will begin reopening the economy in phases. On April 27, the governor announced that the state will reopen some health-care services May 1, and general offices, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies May 4. Retailers will be allowed to reopen May 12.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Ohio.
  • Start date: March 23.
  • End date: Initially April 6. Extended to May 1.

Oklahoma

No statewide stay-at-home order, except for older and immunocompromised people. The mayors of Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Norman have issued stay-at-home orders. On April 22, the governor announced a three-stage plan to begin reopening the state, starting as early as April 24. Restaurants, movie theaters, gyms, sporting venues and places of worship can reopen May 1 if they adhere to physical distancing protocols.

Oregon

  • Rules: People can leave their homes but must maintain at least six feet of social distance. Grocery stores, banks, pharmacies and gas stations remain open. All pools, skate parks, outdoor courts and playgrounds are closed. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Oregon.
  • Start date: March 23.
  • End date: Until terminated by the governor.

Pennsylvania

  • Rules: Residents are ordered to stay home unless traveling for medical treatment or obtaining necessities such as food, medicine or gas. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 27, the governor announced that certain businesses related to outdoor activities, such as golf courses and campgrounds, could reopen May 1.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Pennsylvania.
  • Start date: April 1.
  • End date: Initially April 30. Extended to May 8.

Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico issued a nightly curfew March 15 and added tighter restrictions April 5. Puerto Ricans can leave their homes between 5 a.m. and 7 p.m. to buy food or medicine, go to the bank, or seek medical care. Violators can face up to a $5,000 fine or up to a six-month jail term.

Rhode Island

  • Rules: Residents are required to stay home unless traveling to work, traveling for medical treatment, or obtaining necessities such as food, medicine or gas. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. All gatherings of more than five people in any public or private space are prohibited. Supermarkets, liquor stores, banks and gas stations remain open. On May 4, the governor detailed a multiphase plan for reopening the state as soon as May 9. In the first phase, the stay-at-home order would lift, some parks would reopen, elective medical procedures would be allowed, and some noncritical retailers could reopen.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Rhode Island.
  • Start date: March 28.
  • End date: Initially April 13. Extended to May 8.

South Carolina

  • Rules: People can leave their homes for essential activities such as receiving medical care, caring for family members and pets, obtaining necessary supplies, attending religious services or exercising. Playgrounds and gyms are closed. Stores are not allowed to have more than five customers per 1,000 square feet of retail space, or more than 20 percent of the occupancy limit as determined by the fire marshal — whichever number is smaller. On April 20, the governor announced that many retail outlets will be allowed to reopen, while local jurisdictions will determine public access to beaches.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in South Carolina.
  • Start date: April 7.
  • End date: Until terminated by the governor.

South Dakota

South Dakota has not issued any stay-at-home order.

Tennessee

  • Rules: People can venture out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Takeout food orders are allowed. Banks, gas stations, laundromats and veterinary services are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. Playgrounds are closed. On April 20, the governor announced that stay-at-home orders will end April 30 and that some businesses, particularly in less-populated areas, will begin to reopen as early as April 27. On April 29, the governor announced that barber and beauty shops, as well as nail salons, will reopen May 6.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Tennessee.
  • Start date: March 31.
  • End date: Initially April 14. Extended to April 30.

Texas

  • Rules: People can go out to access essential services or engage in essential daily activities such as going to the grocery store or gas station. Restaurants may be open for takeout, delivery or drive-through. People can visit parks and go hunting or fishing. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 17, the governor issued three orders centered on reopening the state. One allows retail outlets to reopen April 24, but items must be delivered to customers’ cars, homes or other locations to minimize contact. On April 28, the governor said he will let his stay-at-home order expire and allow all retailers, movie theaters, museums, libraries and some health-care businesses to reopen at limited occupancy as part of the first phase of the state’s reopening starting May 1.
  • Curfew: There is no statewide curfew in place in Texas.
  • Start date: April 2.
  • End date: April 30.

U.S. Virgin Islands

  • Rules: All bars are closed. Restaurants may be open for takeout, delivery or drive-through. Grocery stores, gas stations, banks and other businesses that provide “core life services” may remain open. Schools are closed for the rest of the academic year. Beaches were initially closed, but reopened April 20.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place.
  • Start date: March 25.
  • End date: April 30.

Utah

No statewide stay-at-home order, but several counties have one, including Salt Lake County.

Vermont

  • Rules: People can leave their homes, but only for specific things such as going to the grocery store or to the doctor, exercising, or obtaining other essentials. Hardware stores, grocery stores and pharmacies will remain open. Restaurants will remain open for delivery and curbside pickup. On April 17, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen the state, with certain businesses able to reopen April 20. On April 24, the governor outlined additional openings, including outdoor businesses, construction operations and recreation maintenance work, with a maximum of five workers per location, beginning April 27. Outdoor retail space can allow in-person shopping beginning April 27, with a maximum of 10 total people.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Vermont.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: Initially April 15. Extended to May 15.

Virginia

  • Rules: People are allowed to leave home for food, medicine or medical care. All public beaches are closed except for exercise and fishing. Restaurants can “continue to offer delivery and takeout services.” Banks, liquor stores, gas stations and laundromats are also open. Gatherings of more than 10 people are banned. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. All K-12 schools are closed through the rest of the academic year. On April 15, the governor extended his shutdown order for nonessential businesses — which initially was set to expire April 23 — until May 8. On April 24, the governor released a “blueprint” for eventually easing public health restrictions. The governor said Virginia will follow federal guidelines for deciding when to ease restrictions: The percentage of positive coronavirus tests and number of hospitalizations must decline for 14 consecutive days, and the state must have ample hospital capacity and an “increasing and sustainable supply” of personal protective equipment.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Virginia.
  • Start date: March 30.
  • End date: June 10 unless it is extended.

Washington

  • Rules: People can leave their homes to buy groceries, go to the doctor or to work at essential businesses. Restaurants may remain open for food takeout or delivery service only. Banks, convenience stores, gas stations and laundromats are also open. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. Sports courts and playgrounds are closed. All K-12 schools are closed for the rest of the academic year. On April 27, the governor announced a partial reopening of some outdoor recreational activities May 5, including golf, hunting and fishing. On May 1, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 31 and announced a four-phase plan to reopen the state.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Washington.
  • Start date: March 23.
  • End date: Initially April 6. Extended to May 31.

West Virginia

  • Rules: People can leave their homes, but only for essential activities such as going to the grocery store, checking on relatives, picking up a prescription or receiving nonelective medical care. People can exercise outside and take their pets out, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. Restaurants may remain open for food takeout, delivery or drive-through. Gyms and playgrounds are closed. Banks, gas stations, places of worship and hotels are also open. On April 27, the governor announced a six-week plan to reopen the state beginning April 30, provided a “cumulative percent of positive test results remains below 3 percent” from April 27 to April 30.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in West Virginia.
  • Start date: March 24.
  • End date: Until the governor rescinds.

Wisconsin

  • Rules: People can leave their homes, but only for specific things such as going to the grocery store, visiting the doctor or obtaining other essentials. Restaurants may remain open for food takeout or delivery service only. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six-foot physical distancing. Group sports are banned, and playgrounds are closed. Banks, gas stations, laundromats and hardware stores are also open. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing. On April 20, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen Wisconsin once there is a 14-day downward trajectory of positive coronavirus cases. On April 27, the governor said the state would allow nonessential businesses to do curbside drop-off of goods and animals, making it possible for businesses such as dog groomers and repair shops to reopen. On May 1, the governor reopened 34 state parks and forests.
  • Curfew: There is no curfew in place in Wisconsin.
  • Start date: March 25.
  • End date: Initially April 24. Extended to May 26.

Wyoming

No statewide stay-at-home order.