Voters in Argyle, N.Y., a small farming town about an hour north of Albany, decided Tuesday to resign the town’s “dry” status and overturn the Prohibition-era ban on alcohol sales.

Argyle, population 3,700, is one of eight dry towns in New York, according to the State Liquor Authority, where residents 21 and over are welcome to drink but are banned from selling alcohol.

The local law, dating back to 1933, had survived 11 attempts to repeal it, designating it one of the last “dry” towns in the state, according to the Glens Falls Post-Star. This year, things changed.

A handful of locals gathered 462 signatures, the Wall Street Journal reported, which was dozens more than required, to have four questions added to the November ballot: permitting restaurants to sell alcoholic beverages; permitting beer and wine cooler sales at grocery stores and markets; permitting alcohol sales at limited-food taverns; and allowing liquor stores to sell liquor.

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On Tuesday, the Post-Star reported that all four propositions passed by more than double the number of votes required, each one receiving a separate vote.

The 21st Amendment, passed in 1933, ended national Prohibition and left the control and regulation of alcohol sales to the states. Some, including New York, gave local municipalities freedom to enact their own policies.

In the 21st century, the National Alcohol Beverage Control Association has seen a movement across the country toward dry jurisdictions going wet.

“While there may always be dry localities in the United States, they are getting fewer and far between,” according to a 2014 NABCA report, largely attributing the shift to public convenience and that “the moral objections to alcohol use have wilted in recent years.”

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