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Pilot hurries to photograph the world’s glaciers

Garrett Fisher is traveling the world to document every remaining glacier on Earth. “In 100 or 200 years, most of them will be gone or severely curtailed,” Fisher says. “It is the front line of climate change … the first indication that we’re losing something.”

Aviator and adventurer Garrett Fisher flies his plane, small two-seater called a Piper Super Cub, above the Folgefonna glacier in Norway. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

Tourists are seen during a hike to visit the Nigardsbreen glacier in Jostedal, Norway. The Nigardsbreen glacier has lost almost 1.8 miles in length in the past century due to climate change. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

A glacier is seen from Fisher's plane in Norway on July 29. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

An aerial view of the Nigardsbreen glacier in Jostedal, Norway. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

Fisher, who grew up in Upstate New York, edits his photographs of glaciers in his rented home in Voss, Norway, on August 3. He has launched a glacier initiative, a nonprofit to support and showcase his work, and he plans to open his archive to the public for research. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

The Nigardsbreen glacier in Jostedal, Norway. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

Bram Janssen/AP

Bram Janssen/AP

Tourists use a boat to visit the Nigardsbreen glacier in Jostedal, Norway. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

A glacier is seen from Fisher's plane in Norway on July 30. (Bram Janssen/AP Photo)

Fisher's work is more about capturing the beauty of the glaciers than providing scientific data. His photos might encourage people to change their ways, he said. “It’s a very motivating, emotionally compelling rendition of these glaciers while they’re here. Because these views will not come back.” (AP Photo/Bram Janssen)

Bram Janssen/AP

Bram Janssen/AP

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