Dear Readers: Today’s Sound Off is about employers having access to a potential employee’s credit score.

“Dear Heloise: I applied for a job with a large company and was turned down for the position after three interviews. I have a solid track record, with plenty of experience and recommendations from former employers. I’m still in my mid-30s and have a master’s degree, and I’m in good health. In my last position, I won several company awards, and I have never been fired or asked to leave. So, what went wrong?

“They checked my credit score and found out that I had filed for bankruptcy three years ago. This was due to medical bills from my son’s very difficult birth, which my insurance wouldn’t cover. When is Congress going to make it illegal for an employer to invade my private financial information?”

Todd L., Fayetteville, N.C.

Todd L.: Yours is not the first letter we’ve received about this matter. People have missed out on a job because of slow payments, foreclosure on a home and more.

Dear Readers: Here are some other uses for old dressers:

● Paint in bright colors and use outside in the garden to grow plants in the drawers.

● Place in the garage to store items.

● Remove drawers and place baskets in their place.

● Replace legs with wheels and use as a kitchen island.

Dear Readers: We had several responses to a letter from Henry P. in Atlanta about patient care in hospitals. While we here at Heloise Headquarters love our nurses and thank heaven for medical advances, we received letters from all over America about patient care — or the lack of it, due in part to the high cost of care and, in some areas of the country, a shortage of nurses. The following are two different responses.

“I agree with Henry P. of Atlanta about the lack of patient care in hospitals. We recently had a bad experience. The care was terrible. The bed was more of a cot! No washcloths, etc., in the room, and we didn’t get what we ordered on the menu. I can go on and on, but you get the drift.”

A Reader in Texas

“I was recently a patient in a hospital in Michigan and received excellent care. The nurses were so friendly, my doctor always kept me informed about cancer options, and my room was spotless. Sorry Henry P. had a bad experience, because mine was wonderful.”

Janice S., Royal Oak, Mich.

Dear Heloise: I love hiking the trails around my area of Oregon, but I hate seeing doggy poo on the trails of these beautiful places where hikers can step in it. By all means, bring your dog along, but also bring paper towels to gather the poo and place it in a plastic bag. At the first trash can, dump it in, or wait until you get out of the park to dispose of it. Please keep our lovely parks "poo free."

Bella M., Salem, Ore.

Heloise’s column appears six days a week at washingtonpost.com/advice. Send a hint to Heloise, P.O. Box 795001, San Antonio, TX 78279-5000, or email it to Heloise@Heloise.com.

2019, King Features Syndicate