Simple syrup is a good thing to have on hand for mixing up cocktails. Pictured from left, White Lion, Coast of Dufresne and Swizzle Francais. Find the recipes at washingtonpost.com/recipes. (Deb Lindsey/For The Washington Post)

If you’ve made a cocktail lately, chances are you stirred a smidge of simple syrup into the mix. While the blend of sugar and water will keep in the refrigerator for as little as a week or up to several months, who wants a random jar of liquid taking up valuable real estate? Here are some ideas from the Recipe Finder to get that syrup used up in no time — some using a one-to-one syrup (one part sugar to one part water) and others using a rich syrup (two parts sugar to one part water). You’ll see a few recipes that call for Demerara sugar — this coarse, raw sugar adds richness to your drink. If you’ve got it on hand, use it; if not, don’t sweat it.

One-to-one simple syrup

To make simple syrup, combine 1 cup of sugar (or 1 cup of Demarara sugar) and 1 cup of water in a saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar has dissolved. Cook for 2 minutes, then let the syrup cool completely before using.


(Deb Lindsey /For The Washington Post)

(Dixie D. Vereen/For The Washington Post)

Coast of Dufresne, above left. With flavors that evoke a pink grapefruit sprinkled with raw sugar (using Demarara syrup).

Mojito, above right. Easy to make, even easier to drink (using Demarara syrup).


(James M. Thresher/For The Washington Post)

(Dixie D. Vereen/For The Washington Post)

Chambery Fraise, above left. A strawberry and vermouth aperitif.

Stripes and Plaids, above right. With watermelon and Bruto Americano, a bitter red liqueur.

Rich simple syrup

To make a rich simple syrup, combine 2 cups of sugar (or 2 cups of Demarara sugar) and 1 cup of water in a small saucepan over medium heat, stirring until the sugar dissolves. Bring to a slow, rolling boil, then reduce the heat to medium-low and cook for 5 minutes. Transfer the syrup to a heatproof container and let it cool to room temperature before using.


(Deb Lindsey/For The Washington Post)

High Tea. This drink highlights oolong tea; batch it up to serve a crowd.


(M. Carrie Allan/For The Washington Post)

(Scott Suchman/For The Washington Post)

Sherry Cobbler, above left. Dry sherry with citrus and seasonal fruit.

Absinthe Frappe, above right. A cool and refreshing blend of mint, absinthe and club soda.


(Dixie D. Vereen/For The Washington Post)

Classic Daiquiri. The perfect balance of tart and sweet (using Demarara syrup).