Wild turkeys roam all over North America, but most people know next to nothing about the wobbling, gobbling birds.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

Your bones do a lot more than just holding up your organs.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

Wild animals aren’t necessarily chowing down on what you might think.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

They actually use more than one sense to track down their next meal.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

The birds have called cities home for thousands of years. But the reason may surprise you.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

If you guessed “trees,” you’re in for a surprise.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

Antifreeze in their blood and migration are just two ways they beat the cold.

  • Jason Bittel
  • ·

They are, but scientists are still trying to figure out why.

Temperature isn’t the only factor in determining what will fall from the sky.

The tilt of the Earth helps explain it.

It shows signs of life, but scientists don’t agree on whether it’s alive.

Candy chemistry explains how simple sucrose can be chewy, hard or fluffy.

They’re too small to be recycled, so they end up in the landfill by the millions.

Vultures and possums are two creatures that use foul odors to their advantage.

That funny smell and briny taste come from rocks.

  • By Rachel Feltman
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There’s plenty of useless junk circling the planet, thanks to humans.

It’s not simply to clean their fur.

Prairie voles and other animals form lifelong bonds, but that doesn’t mean they feel the way humans do.

Speedskaters try to shave fractions of a second off their times with the help of their uniforms’ fabric.

The Arctic creature’s fur is actually not white at all.

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