Melody, the heroine of “Out of My Mind,” returns in a book about freedom.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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Children's author and illustrator Rául the Third and Washington Post book reviewers share their picks for best kids books of 2021.

Nonfiction stories highlight struggles and resilience.

  • Abby McGanney Nolan
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In “The Troubled Girls of Dragomir Academy,” girls question gender expectations in the magical land of Illyria.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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The award-winning author doesn’t want adults putting limits on kids’ curiosity.

Author Kwame Mbalia came up with the idea during protests of police violence against Black people.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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In “Yusuf Azeem Is Not a Hero,” a boy learns about the terrorist attacks as he deals with present-day bullies.

  • Lela Nargi
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Our “True Friends” theme may inspire kids to form their own book clubs.

As climate change worsens, 4 kids are determined to save what may be the United States’ last bullfrog.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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A new neighbor and a mystery shake up the life of a small-town 12-year-old.

  • Abby McGanney Nolan
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Magic trick brings classmates together, but initially not as friends.

  • Abby McGanney Nolan
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When girls force Jaime out of their group, she begins to examine her own behavior.

Best friends and rivals navigate obstacles to running a race that’s almost too good to be true.

  • Abby McGanney Nolan
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An outgoing boy befriends a quiet girl and pushes her to stand up for a cause they believe in.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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Two girls from opposite sides of the world meet and discover they have a lot to learn from each other.

The British publisher made children’s books popular; 100 years ago his name was suggested for a new U.S. prize.

  • Marylou Tousignant
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A potentially embarrassing mistake sparks a friendship between two middle-schoolers.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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Christina Li’s debut novel pairs middle-schoolers with very different interests.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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This summer’s eight middle-grade books focus on the power of friendship.

Mary Winn Heider’s “The Losers at the Center of the Galaxy” features a dad who has disappeared.

  • Mary Quattlebaum
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