(Marvin Joseph/The Washington Post)
Writer and editor

Donna Brazile, 54, moved to Washington 33 years ago. In addition to her role with the Democratic National Committee, she is a CNN commentator, professor, author and longtime political strategist.

What’s your feeling about Hillary running?

Technically, I’m neutral, but neutrality is something that gets you in trouble because, you ever notice someone who stands on the white line in the middle of the road? They get run over. And I don’t want to get run over. So I’m not neutral. I have to tell people that I’m neutral, but I’m ready for Hillary.

You know this recorder is on?

I know. I saw you turn it on. I know those gadgets.

Who do you hang out with in Washington?

I’ve had the same group of friends for the last 30 years. I also hang out with Eleanor Holmes Norton and members of Congress. I get a chance every now and then to visit George Will and his wife because they make the best cocktails. Seriously, if you’re going to drink a martini, go to George Will’s house at 6 o’clock.

You had a guest spot on “House of Cards.” Do you watch the show?

Of course! I’m addicted to “House of Cards.” I’ve also been on “The Good Wife” three times. The only problem with playing yourself on television is, you have to resist telling the director, “That’s not what Donna would say.”

How much does “House of Cards” remind you of the political Washington, D.C., you know?

The conniving, the sharp knives — I’ve seen all of it. Well, I haven’t seen murder. I tell people I’ve been in politics so long I’m probably best suited for “Game of Thrones” because I’ve dealt with everything this side of dragons.

Has Barack Obama’s presidency made it easier or harder for a black person to become president?

In the aftermath of President Obama’s election, I really thought it was time to write a book on reconciliation. That was 2009, a moment of euphoria. And I must tell you, I have been so disappointed. I mean, I understand the partisanship, because I’m political. But what I don’t understand and what I haven’t been able to wrap my head around is why all the vitriol? Simply because you want to destroy his presidency, you’re destroying the country? So we have not turned that corner. We are not post-racial. And in many ways we don’t even know how to have a conversation about being post-racial. Until we get out of that old-school way of thinking about race and opportunity and the ability to transcend some of the past of this country, then we’re going to be stuck in the 20th-century conversation about race.