Robert Martinez, left, leads a group of protesters out of the stands after the third inning of a game between the San Diego Padres and the Houston Astros in Houston in August 1994. Major league baseball players went on strike the next day. (Rick Bowmer/ASSOCIATED PRESS)

Sept. 14, 1994 Quick, who won the 1994 World Series? The answer is no one because there wasn’t a World Series that year. Players went on strike on Aug. 12, 1994, over a proposal by Major League Baseball owners to collectively impose a salary cap. After 34 days, with no resolution in sight, the owners canceled the rest of the regular season and the postseason. The Washington Post’s Thomas Boswell predicted, “The main actors involved in this labor war ... [are] going to be seen as American traitors.” The strike did not end until March 31, 1995, when now-U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, then a U.S. District court judge in New York, issued a preliminary injunction that stopped team owners from using replacement players to start the 1995 season. The Montreal Expos never fully recovered financially from the strike, and MLB purchased the team after the 2001 season. In 2004, the league moved the team to Washington, where it became the Nationals.

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