Book World

Is the Internet good or bad for democracy?
Jaron Lanier ponders technology — and virtual reality — in search of the future.
 
For better or worse, we’re all related
(The Washington Post, December 15, 2017; 10:43 AM)
 
One soldier’s courageous, life-threatening path to the Medal of Honor
(The Washington Post, December 15, 2017; 10:36 AM)
 
A prayer for CIA accountability — that will likely go unanswered
(The Washington Post, December 15, 2017; 10:22 AM)
 
A book that will make you rethink slavery and the North
(The Washington Post, December 15, 2017; 10:12 AM)
 
Jane Austen: A role model for the #MeToo generation
(The Washington Post, December 14, 2017; 12:24 PM)
 
In war, the battle today is less on the ground than on social media
(The Washington Post, December 14, 2017; 12:00 PM)
 
Snoopy — the world’s coolest dog — finally gets the book he deserves
(The Washington Post, December 13, 2017; 10:39 PM)
 
Hanif Abdurraqib’s vital meditation on music — and living and dying in America
(The Washington Post, December 12, 2017; 2:04 PM)
 
One of theater’s most accomplished directors reveals a life among the stars
(The Washington Post, December 12, 2017; 1:36 PM)
 
Books to get you ready for Harry and Meghan’s royal wedding
(The Washington Post, December 12, 2017; 1:00 PM)
 
Hitler banned it; Gandhi loved it: ‘The Story of Ferdinand,’ the book and, now, film
(The Washington Post, December 12, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Elif Shafak’s new novel is so timely that it seems almost clairvoyant
(The Washington Post, December 11, 2017; 7:54 PM)
 
Joe Biden’s memoir is among the best new audiobooks of December
(The Washington Post, December 11, 2017; 4:40 PM)
 
What bad-sex novels can teach us about consent and harassment
(The Washington Post, December 11, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Michael Dirda’s wondrous holiday book recommendations
(The Washington Post, December 11, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
At 50, does ‘The Graduate’ still hold up — or is it all plastics now?
(The Washington Post, December 11, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Hillary, please don’t reject romance novels — you are a romance novel heroine
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 4:09 PM)
 
Sensitivity of pigs and the thieving of squirrels — all part of animals’ inner lives
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 2:50 PM)
 
Adams and Jefferson — so different yet so essential to our nation’s founding
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 2:48 PM)
 
Why Britain’s national symbol — the cup of tea — is scarcely British
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 2:46 PM)
 
We are in a crisis over trust in government, business and online with no fix in sight
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 2:42 PM)
 
How the loss of vivid, exacting language diminishes our world
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 2:32 PM)
 
Joan Rivers never threw away a joke — or anything else. It’s all here.
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 12:05 PM)
 
In two political memoirs, different facts — and different worlds
(The Washington Post, December 8, 2017; 7:00 AM)
 
The best science fiction and fantasy books to read this month
(The Washington Post, December 7, 2017; 10:00 AM)
 
It’s been 37 years since John Lennon was shot. Can we find the real Lennon in books?
(The Washington Post, December 6, 2017; 6:52 PM)
 
What we can learn from two literary masters: Ursula K. Le Guin and James Salter
(The Washington Post, December 6, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Talking to kids about the Constitution and other best books for young readers
(The Washington Post, December 5, 2017; 2:41 PM)
 
In young-adult novels, queer love stories have begun to feel mainstream
(The Washington Post, December 5, 2017; 2:03 PM)
 
A former congressman asked his old colleagues for book suggestions. Here’s their list.
(The Washington Post, December 5, 2017; 2:01 PM)
 
The man who saved movies from Thomas Edison’s monopoly
(The Washington Post, December 5, 2017; 12:29 PM)
 
The apocalypse, as imagined by Nora Roberts
(The Washington Post, December 5, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
These books can help build strong girls — and boys — for today’s world
(The Washington Post, December 4, 2017; 7:00 AM)
 
The nameless detective who launched Dashiell Hammett’s career
(The Washington Post, December 3, 2017; 5:09 PM)
 
Films that offer a surprising reflection of U.S. foreign policy
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:57 PM)
 
Working for more than two centuries to ease the racial sins of the nation’s capital
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:11 PM)
 
Fighting a war over a war memorial
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:10 PM)
 
A father’s secret: His first wife had been young Tennessee Williams’s girlfriend
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:09 PM)
 
Hoover as the father of New Deal liberalism and modern conservatism
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:04 PM)
 
Conspiracy theories, fake news, racism fueling KKK’s rise — in the 1920s
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 3:03 PM)
 
A young woman caught between Pakistan and the West
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
The 5 worst scenes from Andy Weir’s new book, ‘Artemis’
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
New books by dead authors
(The Washington Post, December 1, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Daniel Mendelsohn learns that teaching his dad ‘The Odyssey’ is a classic trip
(The Washington Post, November 30, 2017; 4:35 PM)
 
Liars, hucksters and fake news are nothing new: a history lesson in hoaxes
(The Washington Post, November 29, 2017; 5:41 PM)
 
Conspiracy theories about Obama spun out to their wackiest sci-fi conclusions
(The Washington Post, November 28, 2017; 2:50 PM)
 
Jonathan Swift turns 350 this week. Would the great satirist be disgusted with DC?
(The Washington Post, November 28, 2017; 12:59 PM)
 
The odd assortment of books that make up the White House Christmas book tree
(The Washington Post, November 28, 2017; 8:00 AM)
 
Jane the Virgin publishes her virgin novel in real life
(The Washington Post, November 27, 2017; 2:50 PM)