The Washington Post

Correction: An earlier version of the article did not mention that one of those schools, Two Rivers Public Charter School, will be keeping part of its current facilities. Two Rivers, which operates pre-kindergarten-to-eighth-grade campuses in two buildings at Fourth Street and Florida Avenue NE, will maintain one of those schools while moving the other to the former Charles E. Young Elementary School at 820 26th St. NE.

Nov. completion date
for Silver Line phase

Officials with the Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority said Wednesday that they expect to complete the first phase of the Silver Line rail extension in November.

The announcement by Jack Potter, chief executive of the MWAA, comes after the authority’s July announcement that there would be an eight-week delay completing the rail line. MWAA officials had earlier said they planned to finish the rail line and turn it over to Metro officials for testing in September.

MWAA officials blamed the delay on additional testing that must be done on the rail line’s safety systems. On Wednesday, Pat Nowakowski, executive director of the rail project, said that contractors also must complete work on the rail stations, test communications systems and complete other tasks before turning the project over to Metro officials, who will do their own testing.

— Lori Aratani

Two charter schools to lease D.C. facilities

Two high-performing public charter schools will lease shuttered D.C. school buildings in Northeast, Mayor Vincent C. Gray (D) announced Wednesday.

KIPP DC will move its high school to the site of the former Hamilton School, at 1401 Brentwood Parkway NE, while Two Rivers Public Charter School will serve part of the students from pre-K through eighth grade at Charles E. Young Elementary School, at 820 26th St. NE. Both schools plan to open at their new facilities by the 2015-16 school year.

KIPP DC plans to demolish the Hamilton school and build a new 120,000-square-foot KIPP DC College Preparatory School, with adjoining athletic fields, in its place. KIPP DC operates 12 schools at all grade levels in the District, but the new KIPP DC College Preparatory School will be its first standalone high school.

The new building will allow KIPP DC College Preparatory School to double in size to 850 students. Hamilton was closed at the end of past school year.

Two Rivers Public Charter School, which has about 500 students in preschool through eighth grade at two buildings on Florida Avenue NE, will also be able to double its enrollment at the former Young School. The building has been closed since 2008.

More than 40 percent of the city’s public school students attend charters, which are publicly funded but operate independently of D.C. Public Schools. Although D.C. law gives public charter schools a legal preference when it comes to using shuttered DCPS school buildings, charter advocates have long complained that the city government has been slow to release the schools.

— Lyndsey Layton

County awards gambling-tax grants

The Anne Arundel County Fire Department hit the jackpot Wednesday, receiving a $7 million gambling-tax grant from Maryland Live Casino and Anne Arundel County.

The casino and the county awarded a total of $20 million in local impact grants for the new fiscal year. Other recipients included the Anne Arundel County Police Department ($2 million), Meade High School ($3 million) and Anne Arundel Community College ($3.7 million).

The community college helped Maryland Live launch a temporary casino dealer school in January and now teaches the trade at its Arundel Mills campus, a half-mile from the casino.

Anne Arundel receives 5.5 percent of slots revenue from state’s largest casino and is tasked with determining distribution. For fiscal 2013, which ended June 30, Maryland Live collected $431 million in gross slots revenue. The county's share was just over $23.7 million.

— J. Freedom du Lac

Men allegedly sold $2 million in drugs

Two men with possible connections to the Mexican Zetas drug cartel are facing charges for allegedly selling more than $2 million worth of methamphetamine to undercover officers, Fairfax County police said.

Marcos Caballero-Moreno, 54, of no fixed address, and Juan Alfredo Sanchez Velasquez, 39, also of no fixed address, were arrested after allegedly shipping large quantities of the drug by mail and delivering it in person to the officers over several months, police said. They also allegedly gave the officers samples of pure cocaine.

They face charges of distributing methamphetamine and cocaine, money laundering and transporting drugs into Virginia. They are being held in Los Angeles, pending extradition.

— J. Freedom du Lac


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