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Protesters clash with Trump supporters
A group of protesters blocking the gate at 3rd and Independence Streets NW. (Justin Jouvenal/The Washington Post)
A group of protesters blocking the gate at 3rd and Indiana Avenue NW. (Justin Jouvenal/The Washington Post)

At checkpoints around downtown D.C., protesters are clashing with Trump supporters.

Hundreds of protesters linked arms across 3rd St. NW to block the Red Gate entrance to the inauguration shortly after 11:45 a.m.

“You want a wall!” They chanted. “You got it!”

Trump supporters try to push through a wall of protesters. (Taylor Hartz/The Washington Post)
Trump supporters try to push through a wall of protesters. (Taylor Hartz/The Washington Post)

Two Trump supporters tried to push through the crowd, one threatening, “Move or I’ll move you.”

Protester Dineen O’Rourke, 21, Long Island, New York, responded, “I have a right to assemble please don’t push us.”

The female Trump supporter responded, “We can stand toe to toe.”
Dineen O'Rourke, 21, argues with an unnamed Trump supporter. (Taylor Hartz/The Washington Post)
Dineen O’Rourke, 21, argues with an unnamed Trump supporter. (Taylor Hartz/The Washington Post)
The protesters held their ground. After about two minutes, the Trump supporters left to find another checkpoint.

Among the protesters, were the Crowe family — a father, mother, son and daughter. They had come to D.C. from Maine, Oregon and Massachusetts to protest Trump’s inauguration.

Three of four members of the family linked arms in the blockade of the gate and the fourth was also among the crowd.

Simone Crowe, Nancy Crowe and Tom Crowe were among protesters blocking the Red Gate. (Justin Jouvenal/The Washington Post)
Simone Crowe, Nancy Crowe and Tom Crowe were among protesters blocking the Red Gate. (Justin Jouvenal/The Washington Post)

“We feel very empowered to be with the people resisting Trump,” said Tom Crowe. “It feels good to make a statement that we don’t agree with him.”

Police hung back and let the protest continue. Most Trump supporters were seeking entrance elsewhere.

But Patrick Maher, 51, who took a 5 a.m. train from New York City this morning to show his support for Donald Trump, was turned away. At 11:45 he was headed home via Union Station.

“I couldn’t get in anywhere,” said Maher.

“They’re babies, they’re children,” he said of the protesters.

Maher said he supports Trump’s policies on secure borders, low taxes, smaller government.

“I’m disappointed I’m not going to see the speech,” said Maher, “but it’s a bit of a party out here, so I’ll make the best of it.”

Another security checkpoint was blocked by protesters at 14th and F Streets NW. They had the intersection to themselves for about an hour before an evangelical activist showed up with a megaphone preaching the word of Jesus.

An evangelist preacher clashes with protesters at 14th and F Street NW.
An evangelist preacher clashes with protesters at 14th and F Street NW. (Antonio Olivo/The Washington Post)

The protesters, there to call attention to the confrontation over a planned oil pipeline in Black Rock, South Dakota, began to shout at the evangelist, angry that his voice was drowning out their own.

“Go home! Go home!” one demonstrator yelled, as the burly evangelist continued to urge the crowd to repent and embrace Jesus.

Finally, the evangelist , who would only identify himself as Michael, had had it.

“Do not touch me, sir, or I will touch back,” he said, moving to a different section of the crowd.

There, a group of demonstrators pushed into the preacher, one of them tearing his bullhorn out of his backpack.

The bullhorn went crashing to the sidewalk and police came rushing in to stop the confrontation.

“I’m just preaching the word of God and they don’t want to hear it,” Michael said moments later, still catching his breath.

“Go home!” another demonstrator yelled.

— Taylor Hartz, Justin Jouvenal and Antonio Olivo

Live coverage of Trump’s inauguration
In this Jan. 15, 2016, photo, the U.S. Capitol frames the backdrop over the stage during a rehearsal of President-elect Donald Trump's swearing-in ceremony in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)
The U.S. Capitol frames the backdrop over the stage during a rehearsal of President-elect Donald Trump’s swearing-in ceremony this week in Washington. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Donald Trump will be sworn in Friday during an inauguration that’s expected to draw between 700,000 and 900,000 people. Security officials said there are 63 demonstration groups, pro and con, also expected Friday. Follow our liveblog for updates through this afternoon’s inaugural parade.

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