The Washington Post

A big thank you to everyone who donated to Send a Kid to Camp

A camper rides on the shoulders of a counselor at Camp Moss Hollow in Markham, Va. (John Kelly/The Washington Post)

Thank you. When the last penny had been counted, readers of The Washington Post had contributed $330,963.53 to this year’s Send a Kid to Camp campaign. When we add in the $100,000 in matching funds that our generous (and anonymous) donor contributed, plus the $20,000 from longtime supporter Clyde’s, we arrive at the very respectable $450,963.53.

While that’s somewhat shy of our $500,000 goal, it’s very close, and it means another fine summer at Camp Moss Hollow for at-risk kids from the Washington area. As always, this has been a grass-roots campaign, composed mainly of lots of little donations. And as always, I enjoyed hearing from readers about the reasons they decided to give.

John Kelly writes "John Kelly's Washington," a daily look at Washington's less-famous side. Born in Washington, John started at The Post in 1989 as deputy editor in the Weekend section. View Archive

Margaret Yowell said she gave in honor of her high school graduation 50 years ago. “I grew up in Loudoun County on a farm,” she wrote. “Fresh air and running free were a given!”

Maureen Cohen said Send a Kid to Camp is a good reason to empty her coin baskets. She found a whopping $188.50. “It really can add up so that many kids will get to experience Camp Moss Hollow,” she wrote.

Along with her $50 donation, Ellen Radday included a note: “I’m 77 years old and summer camp in the mountains feels like yesterday.”

A special thanks to Clyde’s and its family of restaurants for once again devoting a special menu item each week to the campaign.

Here are some of the other groups that gave this year:

Associates of the American Foreign Service Worldwide ($750)

Christ Church Parish Thrift Shop Guild, Washington ($3,000)

Clients of “Tax Babe,” Clinton, Md. ($569)

Community Foundation for the National Capital Region ($1,000)

Complete Care Solutions ($100)

Crown Pawnbrokers ($500)

Eastern Shore Inc. ($1,000)

Edgemoor Condominium residents, Bethesda ($5,885)

Finn Spark ($700)

Greater Horizons ($150)

Insight Property Group ($300)

K & M Enterprises ($50)

Kalik & Associates ($36)

Kaul Family Foundation ($825)

Kenco Beverage Distributors ($200)

Louis & Helen Charitable Foundation ($2,000)

NEXT List ($250)

Reputation Movers ($75)

Sisters of St. Joseph ($100)

SNR Denton ($125)

Speedy & Honey Altman Memorial Camp Foundation ($1,380)

St. Andrew Lutheran Church Preschool Account, Centreville ($100)

St. Mary’s Baptist Church ($1,400)

Sterne, Kessler, Goldstein & Fox ($1,932)

TMG/RAG ($15)

Washington Hebrew Congregation ($14,000)

Washington Matters Mothers ($10)

Woman’s Life Insurance Society ($50)

Women of All Saints Episcopal Church, Chevy Chase ($1,000)

My sincere thanks to everyone who donated.

Park place

Talk about ingenuity: On Friday night, Kevin Thorn and a female friend were hunting for a parking space near her apartment.

Kevin’s friend lives near the National Zoo. No spots were to be found on Connecticut Avenue. Side streets were bumper to bumper, too. Behind her building, on Hawthorne Street, is a mix of angled and parallel parking. A parallel spot was open, but it was too small for Kevin’s 16-foot-long Mustang.

“After circling three times, my friend had a stroke of genius,” wrote Kevin. “She saw a Car2Go car parked in an angled spot.”

The car-sharing service Car2Go uses Smart Cars, which are 8.8 feet long. Kevin’s friend promptly rented the Car2Go and backed it out of the spot. Kevin parked the Mustang there.

Then the couple drove the Car2Go about 100 yards to the small parallel spot. The diminutive vehicle fit nicely.

It costs 41 cents a minute to rent a Smart Car from Car2Go. Wrote Kevin: “Total cost $3.84, which was well worth it to play parking Tetris and create a parking spot out of thin air!”

High school reunions

These area schools are reuniting in the coming weeks and months.

Ballou High School Classes of 1977-1979 — Aug. 2 and 3. Contact Avon Dews at 202-562-4556 or asmileydew@gmail.
, or Greg Browne at 301-379-4863 or gbencouraged@

Archbishop Carroll High Class of 1964 — Sept. 26-28. Contact Walt Chalmers at, or visit www.archbishopcarroll64.

Calvin Coolidge High Class of 1964 — Oct. 17 and 18. Contact Glo Hyman, 864-316-3632 or

Falls Church High Class of 1994 — Oct. 25. Contact

Hayfield Secondary School Mega-Reunion — Classes of the 1970s. Oct. 10-11. Visit www.
, or e-mail, or call Chris Harney at 703-929-8191.

Regina High Class of 1964 — Oct. 5 and 6. Contact Cheryl (Spicer) Watts at 301-598-5003 or, or look on Facebook for Regina High School Class of 1964.

Woodrow Wilson High Class of 1950 — Oct. 11. Contact Damon Cordon at 301-215-7022.

Sandy beach, here I come

I’m taking some time off. My column will resume Aug. 11. Stay cool, everybody.

Twitter: @johnkelly

For previous columns, visit


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