The Washington Post

Man killed in Barracks Row is father of man who was fatally stabbed in prison

A man who died Friday after being robbed and beaten at a Capitol Hill convenience store had lost his 25-year-old son to violence four years ago during a fight in a prison where he was serving time for bank robbery.

Carlton Coltrane, 60, was attacked about 12:30 a.m. May 6 at the 7-Eleven in the 400 block of Eighth Street SE. It occurred at the north end of the Barracks Row strip of restaurants and bars, two blocks from the Eastern market Metro station.

Coltrane, of Southeast, died Friday, and the medical examiner ruled the death a homicide over the weekend. D.C. police have put out a video of two men they want to question. They said the attack started inside the store and continued outside.

In January 2010, Coltrane’s son, Carlton Rama Coltrane, 25, was fatally stabbed in a federal prison in Pollock, La. An FBI spokeswoman in New Orleans, which is handling the investigation, said it was determined the other man acted in self defense.

On Monday, Mary L. Coltrane said she is devastated by the news of her ex-husband’s death. “It’s very heartbreaking,” she said. “I’ve lost both of them tragically. It’s very hard.”

Mary Coltrane declined to comment further, saying police had asked her not to discuss the case due to their investigation.

The younger Coltrane was convicted in U.S. District Court in Alexandria in July 2008 on one count each of armed bank robbery, using a firearm during a crime of violence and conspiracy. He had been scheduled to be released in 2018.

D.C. police are offering a reward up to $25,000 to anyone providing information that leads to the arrest and conviction in the elder Coltrane’s death. Anyone with information is urged to call police at 202-727-9099.

Get updates on your area delivered via e-mail



Success! Check your inbox for details. You might also like:

Please enter a valid email address

See all newsletters

Show Comments
Most Read



Success! Check your inbox for details.

See all newsletters

Your Three. Video curated for you.

To keep reading, please enter your email address.

You’ll also receive from The Washington Post:
  • A free 6-week digital subscription
  • Our daily newsletter in your inbox

Please enter a valid email address

I have read and agree to the Terms of Service and Privacy Policy.

Please indicate agreement.

Thank you.

Check your inbox. We’ve sent an email explaining how to set up an account and activate your free digital subscription.