Thursday, SEPT. 19

Olmsted Woods walk, birder Sheila Cochran leads a walk in the restored woods and discusses the native groundcovers, shrubs and trees that attract birds and other wildlife; take binoculars. 8:30 a.m., meet at the George Washington statue on Pilgrim Road on the grounds of Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-2319 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

“Uno, dos, tres . . . Andres!”for ages 2-6, counting, playing and dancing with Andrés Salguero to songs familiar and new as he uses sing-alongs and movement to share Spanish words. 10 and 11:15 a.m. Thursday-Friday, Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org.

Woodridge Checkmates, chess instruction for ages 2-6. 10:15 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Garden tour and kids in “snugglies,” volunteers take turns leading parents or care providers with one child in a snuggly for a tour of the conservatory. 10:30 a.m. Thursdays, through Sept. 26, U.S. Botanic Garden, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Plant talk at National Garden, education technician Alex Torres discusses the diversity of American plants; take sunscreen and water. 10:30 a.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Garden Court, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Behind-the-scenes cathedral tour, for age 11 and older, see gargoyles and stained-glass windows, climb a lot of stairs for a panoramic view of the city; bring a camera. 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. most weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $15. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Students “sit-in” training, meet a civil rights activist; take part in a training session based on a 1960s manual and prepare for your first sit-in. 11:30 a.m. and 1:30, 3 and 4:30 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays, National Museum of American History, second floor, East Wing, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Constitution book talk, David Robertson discusses his work “The Original Compromise: What the Constitution’s Framers Were Really Thinking,” an examination of each debate from the convention, showing how it emerges piece by piece, the product of a web of agreements. Noon, National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Vardanant’s Day lecture, Charles de Lamberterie discusses “The Armenian Language and the Indo-European Linguistic Family.” Noon, Library of Congress, Northeast Pavilion, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5680.

Library of Congress lecture, Kluge staff fellow Adrienne Lundgren discusses “The Photographs of F. Holland Day, Creating a Materials-Based Catalogue Raisonne for Photography.” 4 p.m., Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Room LJ119, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-0213.

Pilates in the park, taught by certified instructors; take a mat. 5:30 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 10, Farragut Square, 17th and K streets NW. Free. 202-463-3400.

Local Dance Commissioning Project: The Meaning of Buck Dance, directed by D.C. choreographer Emily Oleson, features Urban Artistry with Good Foot Dance Company and Baakari Wilder. 6 p.m. Thursday-Friday, Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Graffiti and Street Art, graffiti historian and author Roger Gastman, founder and publisher of While You Were Sleeping and Swindle pop culture magazines, discusses contemporary graffiti and traces its roots to the late 1960s in New York and Philadelphia’s subway cars, ice cream trucks, park benches and other locations. Gastman introduces a screening of “The Legend of Cool ‘Disco’ Dan”; a question-and-answer session follows. 6:30-8:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $25. 202-633-3030.

U.S. Navy Band concert, the Commodores jazz ensemble performs. 7:30 p.m., Yards Park, Third and Water streets SE. Free. 202-433-2525.

“After the Revolution,” by Amy Herzog, with music by Matthew Nielson, performed by Peter Birkenhead, Nancy Robinette and others. 7:30 p.m. most Wednesdays-Thursdays; 3 and 8 p.m. Saturdays; 3 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays; noon Oct. 4. Theater dark Sept. 19 and 26. Washington D.C. Jewish Community Center, Theater J, 1529 16th St. NW. $30-$65. 800-494-8497 or www.boxofficetickets.com.

“Shear Madness,” performance of a comedy-mystery set in Georgetown, with audience participation to help solve a mock murder. 8 p.m. Tuesdays-Fridays, 6 and 9 p.m. Saturdays, 3 and 7 p.m. Sundays, Kennedy Center, Family Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $48. 202-467-4600.

“Measure for Measure,” Jonathan Munby directs the Shakespeare comedy about what happens in a city when the duke leaves on a diplomatic mission. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays; 2 and 7:30 p.m. Sundays; 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Wednesdays. Through Oct. 27. Lansburgh Theatre, 450 Seventh St. NW. $40-$100, discounts for students, seniors, military, groups and age 35 and younger. 202-547-1122 or www.shakespearetheatre.org.

“Detroit,” Lisa D’Amour’s explosive dark comedy about a couple whose upwardly mobile life begins to crumble when a new couple comes to town. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays; 2 and 8 p.m. most Saturdays; 2 and 7 p.m. Sundays; 8 p.m. Wednesdays. Through Oct. 6. Woolly Mammoth Theatre, 641 D St. NW. $35-$75, subject to availability. 202-393-3939 or www.woollymammoth.net.

Don Juan,” Faction of Fools Theatre Company presents the Moliere play adapted and directed by Matthew R. Wilson. 8 p.m. Thursdays through Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays; 7:30 p.m. Sept. 30. Through Oct. 6. Gallaudet University, Elstad Auditorium, 800 Florida Ave. NE. $25; students, military, seniors and groups, $15; age 12 and younger, $10. 202-503-9760 or www.factionoffools.org/donjuan.

“The Velocity of Autumn,” performance of Eric Coble’s play about a 79-year-old woman who lives alone in a Brooklyn brownstone with her memories — and enough explosives to take down most of her block. Starring Estelle Parsons and Stephen Spinella. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 8 p.m. Fridays; 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays; 2 p.m. Sundays; 7:30 p.m. Tuesdays-Wednesdays; noon Oct. 8, 9 and 16. Through Oct. 20, Arena Stage, 1101 Sixth St. SW. $40-$90, subject to change and based on availability. 202-488-3300 or www.arenastage.org.

“The Marriage of Maria Braun,” a stage version of the powerful World War II drama of love, lust, and loss by German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, suitable for age 16 and older. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays-Wednesdays. Through Oct. 11, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Call for ticket prices. 202-399-7993 or www.scenatheater.org.

Friday, SEPT. 20

AARP driver safety course, for age 50 and older, certificate given upon completion. 9:30 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Friday and Monday, Sibley Memorial Hospital, Renaissance Building, Room 2. 202-364-7602; 12:30-4:30 p.m. Tuesday-Wednesday, Hattie Holmes Senior Center, 324 Kennedy St. NW. 202-291-6170. $14 per course, registration requested.

Beekeeping for beginners, New Jersey State Apiarist Tim Schuler discusses the necessity for honey bees for pollination and honey production, why people keep bees and how to start the process. U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Classroom, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Japanese folk song lecture,Franklin Odo, founding director of the Asian Pacific American program at the Smithsonian, will speak on “Voices from the Canefields: Folksongs from Japanese Immigrant Workers in Hawaii.” Noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5510.

Arts@Midday classical guitarist Charles Mokotoff performs works by Albeniz, Granados, Reis, Cardosa and others. 12:15-1 p.m., St. Alban’s Episcopal Church, 3001 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-363-8286 or www.StAlbansDC.org.

Pipe organ concert, John Cannon performs works by J.S. Bach, Max Reger, Andrew Clarke, Ennio Morricone and Errki Melartin. 12:15-1 p.m., National City Christian Church, 5 Thomas Cir. NW. Free, donations welcome. 202-797-0103.

Aaron Broadus and the Georgetown University Jazz Ensemble, a program of big band classics recalling the years when artists such as Benny Goodman and Gene Krupa performed. 1:15 p.m., Georgetown University, McNeir Hall, 37th and O streets NW. Free. 202-687-2787.

“The Hidden History of Black Internationalism in the U.S,” Greg Carr, chair of Howard University’s Afro-American studies department, and historian Gerald Horne, professor of history and African American studies at the University of Houston, discuss Syria, Iran and the international movement to end racial oppression, colonialism and class exploitation. Hosted by Ubiquity, Inc., a non-profit, Pan-African community outreach social organization. 6:30-9 p.m., Howard University, Blackburn Center, 2397 Sixth St. NW. Free. 202-744-2641. www.nommospeakersbureau.com.

India’s maestros of music and dance, a Kathak dance performance featuring Aditi Mangaldas, one of India’s prominent classical dance artists. 7:30 p.m. Friday, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday, Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 301-267-1188.

Classical music concert, Avanti Orchestra of the Friday Morning Music Club performs Baroque works by Vivaldi, Piatti and J. S. Bach. 8 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Free. 703-243-7047.

Revolution in Washington, a National Park Service ranger leads a walking tour and discusses Washington and Jefferson, John Paul Jones and Casimir Pulaski, figures of the American Revolution. 8-10 p.m., National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. Paul O’Brian, 202-438-7066.

Baroque favorites concert, the Avanti Orchestra performs works by Vivaldi, Piatti and J. S. Bach. 8 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Free. 202-333-2075.

Saturday, SEPT. 21

National Book Festival, more than 100 authors, illustrators and poets making presentations in the children and teens category, along with fiction and mystery, history and biography, contemporary life, poetry and prose, graphic novels and science fiction and special programs pavilions; appearances by Giada De Laurentiis, Andrea Davis Pinkney, Steve Vogel, Margaret Atwood, Joyce Carol Oates, Fred Hiatt, Stuart Eizenstat, Linda Ronstadt and many others. Sponsored by the Library of Congress. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Saturday, noon-5:30 p.m. Sunday, the Mall, between Ninth and 14th streets NW. Free. 888-714-4696 or www.loc.gov/bookfest.

President Lincoln’s Cottage Family Day, a day of Civil War reenactments, live entertainment, children’s activities including pony rides, peacock chasing and a petting zoo with Tad Lincoln’s favorite animal, tour of the cottage and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., President Lincoln’s Cottage (enter through Eagle Gate), on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home, Rock Creek Church Road and Upshur Street NW. $15; ages 6-12, $5. 800-514-3849. www.lincolncottage.org/FamilyDay2013.

Mark Lohr: hooked on books! A children’s show designed to use juggling and classic comedy to show kids how many more surprises come from reading than from watching TV. 9:30 and 11 a.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

Imperial China: 2,000 Years of Political Evolution, Chinese historian Edward McCord reveals that contrary to the popular image of China as a timeless and unchanging empire, dynastic leaders built on the achievements of their predecessors to make their own contributions to improving governance and strengthening territorial security. 9:30 a.m.-4:15 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130. 202-633-3030.

Fin-de-Siecle Vienna: A Golden Age of Music and Art, David Gariff, Catholic University art history professor, discusses how and why fin-de-siecle Vienna saw this rich flowering of masterworks with seminal personalities in arts, letters, and philosophy crossed paths, among them Gustav Mahler, Sigmund Freud, Hugo Wolf, Gustav Klimt, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Arnold Schoenberg, Oskar Kokoschka and Egon Schiele in its sphere of influence. 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. , S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130. 202-633-3030.

Day of the dog, a celebration of everything we love about them; activities for people and pups include contests, games, demonstrations, visits with pet adoption agencies, shelters and more; take your leashed dogs and join members of the K9 Corps. 10 a.m.-3 p.m., Congressional Cemetery, 1801 E St. SE. Free, some activities and contests require tickets. 202-543-0539 or www.congressionalcemetery.org.

The Big Build: A Hands-On Family Festival, visitors can try building a brick wall, carving stone and other construction jobs while learning about tools, trucks and the building arts and meeting plumbers, electricians, ironworkers, landscape architects and others; visit the building industry exhibit on building green through environmentally friendly practices. 10 a.m.-4 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Junior Botanist Festival, staff and volunteers lead hands-on activities and discussions, interact with Emily Porter of Project BudBurst, nutritionist Danielle Navidi and beekeeper Tim Schuler. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Terrace, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Elizabethan garden tours, docent-led tours of the library’s knot garden that features Shakespeare-inspired statues by Gregg Wyatt. 10 and 11 a.m., Folger Shakespeare Library, 201 East Capitol St. SE. Free. 202-544-7077.

Guided bike ride, about three hours, led by a National Park Service ranger, with stops to discuss the myths and half-truths of U.S. history; take your own bike, water and snacks, helmets required. 2-5 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays, through Sept. 29, Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. 202-426-6841.

India’s maestros of music and dance, a performance by sisters Ranjani and Gayathri, Carnatic singers. 2 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 301-267-1188.

Tango lesson, for all experience levels, Bahman Aryana of Rendezvous Tango shows how to practice the dance. 2:30 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, 901 G St. NW. Free. 202-727-0321.

“The lamps are going out all over Europe,” a National Park Service ranger discusses the words that created World War I in 1914, a war nobody saw coming. 3 p.m., D.C. War Memorial, Independence Avenue between the National World War II and Lincoln memorials. Free. Paul O’Brian, 202-438-7066.

Georgetown University Orchestra symphonic workshop, a performance of Steve Antosca’s “moment,” a work commissioned to accompany the Charles Ritchie exhibit “Night and Reflection,” a panel discussion on the intersection of music, art and technology follows. 4 p.m., Georgetown University, Walsh Building Lobby, 37th and O streets NW. Free. 202-687-2787.

Symbolism at the Navy Memorial, a National Park Service ranger leads a walking tour of the memorial and discusses its symbolism. 5 p.m., U.S. Navy Memorial, Naval Heritage Center, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. Ron Grissom, 202-604-8422.

Guy Davis in concert, the musician, composer and storyteller revives the traditions of acoustic blues. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

I ndia’s maestros of music and dance, a performance by one of India’s foremost Odissi dance companies, Nrityagram performs Samyoga, featuring artists Surupa Sen and Bijayini Satpathy. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 301-267-1188.

Flory Jagoda and Friends, a concert of Sephardic music from Virginia. 8 p.m., Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free, tickets required. 202-707-5510.

Sunday, SEPT. 22

World’s largest stamp gallery opening, the National Postal Museum hosts an event for kids, a Medal of Honor enshrinement ceremony with Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno, a special first-day-of-issue ceremony by the Postal Service, a children’s stamp collection workshop with free stamps and more; meet and greet Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck and Tweety Bird. 10 a.m.-5:30 p.m., National Postal Museum, 2 Massachusetts Ave. NE. Free. 202-633-5555 or www.npm.si.edu.

Global hunger forum, Cathedral Missioner Patty Johnson talks with George Jones, chief executive officer of Bread for the City, and Alexandra Ashbrook, director of D.C. Hunger Solutions, about the realities of global hunger and hunger in the District. 10:10 a.m., Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Portrait Story Days: Rachel Carson, listen to a story about the biologist, writer and ecologist, then create a simple print. 2-5 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, first floor, Education Center, Room E151, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Utsav: India’s maestros of music and dance, a performance by Carnatic violinists Lalgudi Krishnan and Lalgudi Vijayalakshmi, children of the legendary Lalgudi Jayaraman. 2 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. Stephanie Campbell, 301-267-1188.

War Memoranda: A Conversation with Binh Dahn and Robert Schultz, artist Dahn and Schultz, Roanoke College English professor, discuss the exhibit “Tell It with Pride: The 54th Massachusetts Regiment and Augustus Saint-Gaudens’ Shaw Memorial.” 2 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

Lee’s Invasions of the North, a National Park Service ranger discusses Robert E. Lee’s reasons for his two invasions of the Union North, Antietam and Gettysburg, and his failure to anticipate the results. 3 p.m., Lincoln Memorial, 23rd Street NW and West Potomac Park. Free. Jan Buerger, 202-497-1397.

Persian classical music concert, performed by Nader Majd and the Chakavak Ensemble. 3:30 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Registration: www.hillcenterdc.org or 202-549-4172.

“Le Joli Mai,” Chris Marker and Pierre Lhomme’s restored 1963 film that captured interviews with Parisian passers-by on the meaning of happiness, music by Michel Legrand, English commentary by actress Simone Signoret, in French with English subtitles. 4:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6799.

Pipe organ recital, Brian Mathias performs works by Gigout, Schumann, Charles-Marie Widor, Stephen Paulus and Durufle. 5:15 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Great Choir, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Suggested donation, $10. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Elvis and George: related?, a National Park Service Ranger leads a walking tour and discusses the mystery of George Washington’s life and legacy. 6-8 p.m., Foggy Bottom-GWU Metro station, 2301 I St. NW. Free. Call Lowell Fry, 202-438-9603.

U.S. Army Band concert, the Downrange ensemble performs contemporary repertoire of rock, pop, country, and rhythm and blues. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Forough-Kim-Lipman Trio in concert, a performance of works by Reza Vali and Franz Schubert. Latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Indian dance performance, Mythili Prakash performs classical bharatanatyam dance. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. Stephanie Campbell, 301-267-1188.

Monday, SEPT. 23

Art talk, curator Charles Ritchie discusses “An American Artist in Rural Ireland: My Ballinglen Adventures.” 12:10 and 1:10 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Small Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

Chess for girls, for ages 4-14, learn how to play and how to strategize. 5:30 p.m., Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Checkmates chess for youths,Vaughn Bennett teaches children and teens how to play chess, using strategies that also apply to other life situations. 5:30 p.m. Mondays through Sept. 23, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

Väsen in concert, the Swedish band performs Swedish folk music blending elements of roots, Nordic and world music. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Theater Lab, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

The Women,” George Cukor’s 1939 film about a calculating shop girl who lures another woman’s wealthy husband away from her, with Joan Crawford, Norma Shearer, Rosalind Russell, Paulette Goddard and Joan Fontaine. 6:30 p.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

“The Island,” Freedom Theatre performs the South African apartheid-era drama by Athol Fugard, John Kani and Winston Ntshona. 7:30 p.m. Monday-Tuesday, Georgetown University, Davis Performing Arts Center, Devine Studio Theatre, 37th and O streets NW. $15; seniors, $12; students, $7. 202-687-2787.

Tuesday, SEPT. 24

Tudor Place landscape, a guided tour of the historic mansion’s 5 1 / 2 .acres of landscape design, including lawns, rose gardens, fountains and more. 10 a.m. and 3 p.m. Tuesday and Oct. 1 and 22, Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $10; registration recommended: www.tudorplacehistoricandgrowing.eventbrite.com. 202-965-0400.

Classical music concert, violinist Jocelyn Adelman and pianist Amanda Halstead perform works by Zemlinsky, Ernst Krenek and Olivier Messiaen, Jewish composers whose music was suppressed during the 1930s and 40s. 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Suggested donation, $10. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.

Cathedral tour and tea, docents lead an hour-long cathedral highlights tour followed by tea in the Pilgrim Gallery. 1:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, West End Docent Station, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $30. 202-537-5581 or www.allhallowsguild.org.

Creating Sustainable Landscapes, Travis Beck, author of “Principles of Ecological Landscape Design,” leads a walk through the National Garden, highlighting specific examples of applying ecological concepts to create sustainable landscapes. 3 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, National Garden Lawn Terrace, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Homework help, and help with special projects for ages 13-19. 4 p.m. Tuesdays, Francis A. Gregory Library, 3660 Alabama Ave. SE. Free. 202-645-4297.

Illustrated tour: Catholic University’s history, Robert Malesky and John Feeley lead a tour and discuss Thomas Jefferson’s guest status on the campus, the area’s “Little Rome” nickname, Fort Slemmer and the Brooks Mansion. 4 p.m. Tuesday in the Library’s May Gallery; Malesky leads a tour of the campus, 4 p.m. Next Thursday in front of the library. Catholic University, John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. Free. 202-319-5600.

Concert in the courtyard, Alma Tropicalia performs a mix of samba, bossa nova, and rock and roll. 5:30-7:30 p.m., National Geographic Courtyard, 1600 M St. NW. Free. 202-463-3400.

Cathedral Crossroads, writer Randon Billings Noble discusses how different writers describe the spiritual journey and invites participants to write a piece of their own, 7:30-8:30 p.m. in Bethlehem Chapel; tap into your inner healing ability and mind-body wellness in an evening of contemplative practice and labyrinth walking. 6-8:45 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

Anna Karenina,” the 2012 film adaptation of a Tolstoy novel about a 19th century Russian high society woman who falls in love with another man, starring Keira Knightley, Jude Law and Emily Watson. 6 p.m., Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. Free. 202-727-0232.

Dutch-based quartet, Arifa, ensemble members from Romania, Turkey, the Netherlands and Germany perform music as diverse as their origins, moving from traditional Turkish and Balkan sounds to jazz and classical music. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Anacostia youth chess club, for ages 10-16, learn the game or improve your skills. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, Anacostia Library, 1800 Good Hope Rd. SE. Free. 202-715-7707.

Bellevue Library chess for teens, for all skill levels, an informal environment. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, 115 Atlantic St. SW. Free. 202-243-1184.

D.C. Builds: Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial Library, Philip G. Freelon, president of the Freelon Group, discusses his firm’s conceptual study of the building, current renovation efforts and the future of the library, with chief librarian Ginnie Cooper. 6:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $20; students, $12. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Ecological landscape design for a changing world, author Travis Beck discusses how an understanding of contemporary ecology can help us design landscapes for our ever-changing world. 6:30 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Classroom, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333 or www.usbg.gov.

Marian Anderson, artist and icon, Dwandalyn R. Reece, curator of music and performing arts at the African American History and Culture Museum, uses music, films and items in the museum’s collection to explore the black contralto’s roles as an artist and icon in the context of the changing social, political and cultural landscapes of the 20th century. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

The Smartest Kids in the World,” journalist Amanda Ripley discusses her book about the reasons behind the failure of U.S. students to keep up with those in other countries. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Register: www.hillcenterdc.org or 202-549-4172.

Wednesday, SEPT. 25

Gallery talk, John Hessler of the Geography and Map Division discusses “Astronomy and Astrology in Mayan Writing: The Codex Peresianus and Materials from the Jay I. Kislak Collection.” Noon, Library of Congress, second floor, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-4604.

Art gallery talk, a staff member discusses “Awake in the Dream World: The Art of Audrey Niffenegger.” Noon-12:30 p.m., National Museum of Women in the Arts, 1250 New York Ave. NW. Free. 202-783-5000.

“The Prodigal Son,” a film of Ballets Russes Dances originally premiered by Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, shown in conjunction with the exhibit “Diaghilev and the Ballets Russes, 1909–1929: When Art Danced with Music.” 12:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Large Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

Banda Magda in concert, the New York-based band performs its own blend of French pop, South American rhythms, jazz and more. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Yoga class, 6 p.m. Wednesdays, through Oct. 30. Yards Park, Third and Water streets SE. Free. 202-289-0111. www.yardspark.org.

Chess for kids, all skill levels welcome. 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Cleveland Park Library, 3310 Connecticut Ave. NW. 202-282-3080; and 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays, Francis A. Gregory Library, 3660 Alabama Ave. SE. 202-645-4297. Free.

Deanwood Library chess for beginners, all ages. 6 p.m. Wednesdays, Deanwood Library, 1350 49th St. NE. Free. 202-698-1175.

Game night at Southwest Library, Wii games, board games and more. 6:30 p.m. Mondays and Wednesdays, Southwest Library, 900 Wesley Pl. SW. Free. 202-724-4752.

Picasso: Beyond Innovation, art historian Nancy G. Heller, a professor at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, reviews the highlights of Picasso’s extraordinary career, examining the sociopolitical and cultural contexts in which he lived and worked, and discusses his rich relationship to earlier art history and his continuing relevance for art lovers and emerging artists in the 21st century. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

The Real JAG, Fred Borch, a former Army lawyer and now regimental historian for the Army’s JAG (Judge Advocate General), discusses the past and present role of lawyers who serve in the Army, Navy, Air Force, Marine Corps and Coast Guard. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

Current events conversation, radio host Bill Press and retired Episcopal bishop Gene Robinson discuss current events. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Registration: www.hillcenterdc.org or 202-549-4172.

“Red Speedo,” Lucas Hnath’s dark and stylish comedy about swimming, survival of the fittest and the American dream of a level playing field — or of leveling the field yourself. 8 p.m. Wednesdays-Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7 p.m. Sundays. Through Oct. 13, Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. $20. 202-332-3300. www.studiotheatre.org.

Thursday, SEPT. 26

“Trials Without End: Political Violence and Democracy in Bolivia after World War II,” a lecture by Laura Gotkowitz. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-0213.

Smart Growth: Vacant Lots: Liabilities or Assets? Tamar Shapiro, president and chief executive officer of the Center for Community Progress, discusses how innovative community and civic leaders are working to understand how vacant lots can be used as assets to strengthen communities. 12:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free, registration required. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

Illustrated tour: Catholic University’s history, Robert Malesky and John Feeley lead a tour and discuss Thomas Jefferson’s guest status on the campus, the area’s “Little Rome” nickname, Fort Slemmer and the Brooks Mansion. 4 p.m., Catholic University, in front of the John K. Mullen of Denver Memorial Library, 620 Michigan Ave. NE. Free. 202-319-5600.

Pilates in the park, taught by certified instructors; take a mat. 5:30 p.m. Thursdays through Oct. 10, Farragut Square, 17th and K streets NW. Free. 202-463-3400.

Classical music concert, the Rosslyn-based National Chamber Ensemble, Artisphere’s Ensemble in Residence, performs classical and contemporary compositions performed by internationally-acclaimed chamber musicians. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Expressions of Balinese Spirit through Gamelan, I Ketut Suadin, director of the Gamelan Mitra Kusuma ensemble, and his fellow musicians explore the dynamic sound of Balinese gamelan through the percussive rhythms of gongs, drums and metallophones as they perform traditional and contemporary pieces; take a blanket or lawn chair for garden seating. 6 p.m., Textile Museum, 2320 S St. NW. $25, advance registration required. 202-667-0441, Ext. 64.

Spotlight on Design: Walter Hood, the Berkeley, Calif.-based landscape architect and public artist discusses his work, including Splashpad Park, the de Young Museum and Lafayette Square Park plus the new town square for the Nauck neighborhood near Shirlington. 6:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $20; students, $12. Free. 202-272-2448. www.nbm.org.

The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World of the 1950s, William Hitchcock, a University of Virginia history professor, makes the case that between 1945 and 1961, no single person dominated American public life more than Dwight D. Eisenhower and examines the paradoxical legacy of the Eisenhower years. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

Islam’s Answers to Universal Questions, Jonathan Brown, an associate professor of Islam and Muslim Christian Understanding in the School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, discusses how the Muslim faith tradition and the civilization that it inspired have tried to address questions regarding man’s purpose in the world, “right vs. wrong vs. just,” how we should govern ourselves and more. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

“Berga: Soldiers of Another War,” a screening of Charles Guggenheim’s final film, the extraordinary story of 350 American soldiers, taken prisoner at the Battle of the Bulge, then caught in the Holocaust tragedy. 7 p.m., National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Baseball book talk, author Frederic Frommer talks with CBS News journalist Bob Schieffer about his book “You Gotta Have Heart: A History of Washington Baseball from 1859 to the 2012 National League East Champions.” 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. Registration: www.hillcenterdc.org or 202-549-4172.

“The Marriage of Maria Braun,” a stage version of the powerful World War II drama of love, lust, and loss by German filmmaker Rainer Werner Fassbinder, suitable for age 16 and older. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Saturdays; 3 p.m. Sundays, Tuesdays-Wednesdays. Through Oct. 11, Atlas Performing Arts Center, 1333 H St. NE. Call for ticket prices. 202-399-7993.

“Red Speedo,” Lucas Hnath’s dark and stylish comedy about swimming, survival of the fittest and the American dream of a level playing field — or of leveling the field yourself. 8 p.m. Thursdays-Fridays, 2 and 8 p.m. Saturdays, 2 and 7 p.m. Sundays, 8 p.m. Wednesdays. Through Oct. 13, Studio Theatre, 1501 14th St. NW. $20. 202-332-3300. www.studiotheatre.org.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

TO SUBMIT AN EVENT

E-mail: districtlocalliving@washpost.com (to the attention of Gerri Marmer)
Mail:
Community Events, District Local Living, The Washington Post, 1150 15th St. NW, Washington, D.C., 20071.
Details:
Announcements are accepted on a space-available basis from public and nonprofit organizations only and must be received at least 14 days before the Thursday publication date. Include event name, dates, times, exact address, prices and a publishable contact phone number.