Thursday, MARCH 14

Chess club, tailored for ages 2 and older. 10 a.m. Thursdays, Woodridge Library, 1801 Hamlin St. NE. Free. 202-541-6226.

The Building Zone, for age 6 and younger with an adult, activities focusing on the trades within the building-arts community. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Mondays-Saturdays, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sundays, National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $3. 202-272-2448.

Behind the scenes cathedral tour, for age 11 and older; see gargoyles and stained-glass windows and climb a lot of stairs for a panoramic view of the city; take a camera. 10:30 a.m. most weekdays, Washington National Cathedral, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. $15. 202-537-6200.

Step Afrika! reads, for ages 2-5, an interactive program. 11 a.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

“Beijing Besieged by Waste,” a documentary about China’s waste problem, exacerbated by a burgeoning population, booming industry and urban growth. In Mandarin with English subtitles. Noon, Ronald Reagan Building, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, 1300 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org.

Scrabble at the library, for adults. 1 p.m., Chevy Chase Library, 5625 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-282-0021.

Cherry trees walking tour, a National Park Service ranger discusses the trees’ history. 2-4 p.m. and 8-10 p.m., Martin Luther King Jr. Memorial, West Potomac Park, between the Lincoln and Jefferson memorials, Independence Avenue SW. Free. Kawther Elmi, 202-438-6184.

Artist talk, Glenn Ligon talks with associate curators Molly Donovan and James Meyer. A book signing follows. 3:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

The Music of Puerto Rico, singer-songwriter and radio host Larry Groce emcees a multi-instrumental performance by Angélica Negron and American singer-songwriter and guitarist Aaron Lee Tasjan. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“A Community of Gardeners,” a look at seven community gardens in Washington as sources of food, outdoor classrooms and centers of social interaction. A question-and-answer session follows. 6:30 p.m., U.S. Botanic Garden, Conservatory Classroom, 100 Maryland Ave. SW. Free, registration required. 202-225-8333.

Minds in the Water,” a documentary about professional surfer Dave “Rasta” Rastovich, who became an ocean activist to help stop the commercial slaughter of dolphins and whales. 6:30 p.m., Edmund Burke School, 4101 Connecticut Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org.

Yarrow Mamout, author James H. Johnston discusses the life and career of the former slave who became a Georgetown businessman. 6:30 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $20. To register, go to http://yarrowmamout.eventbrite.com. 202-965-0400.

“Every Man a Rembrandt,” curator William L. Bird Jr. explores the paint-by-number craze of the 1950s, then invites visitors to try their hand at a masterpiece. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

The Battle of Stalingrad, historian Jochen Hellbeck discusses the battle that changed the psychological tide of World War II.. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

Evening with a park ranger, a National Park Service ranger leads a tour and discusses the history of the memorials; take water and a flashlight. 7-9 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, National World War II Memorial, 17th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-426-6841

Jazz concert, bassist Eric Wheeler leads the newly formed Hill Center Jazz Ensemble. 7:30 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $15. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

The Last Mountain,” documentary about the conflict between mining giant Massey Energy and the Appalachian community that wants to build a wind farm. 7:30 p.m., Chevy Chase Presbyterian Church, 1 Chevy Chase Cir. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org.

Classical music concert, violinists Jaime Laredo and Jennifer Koh and the Curtis Chamber Orchestra perform works by J. S. Bach, Philip Glass, David Ludwig, Anna Clyne and Tchaikovsky. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $45. 202-467-4600.

An Evening with Dolora Zajick, Peter Russell, general director, Vocal Arts D.C., talks with the mezzo soprano, a reception follows, sponsored by the Wagner Society. 7:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. Free, rsvp: www.wagner-dc.org. 703-370-1923.

Friday, March 15

“Koch,” Neil Barsky’s film about the quintessential New Yorker, and former mayor Ed Koch, who led the city from 1978 to 1989. Call theater for showtimes, Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11; students, $9; seniors, $8.25; age 12 and younger, $8. 202-966-6000.

Flying Feet and Fiddle Bows: An Irish Celebration, for ages 5-12, learn about Irish music and dances from dancer Shannon Dunne and Pete Moss and the Bog Band. 10:15 and 11:30 a.m., Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org.

The Battle of Guilford Court House, a National Park Service Ranger in colonial attire discusses the 1781 battle and tells who won, sign a “thank you” sheet with a quill pen. 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Thomas Jefferson Memorial, 900 Ohio Dr. SW. Free. Call Mike Rose, 202-438-9667.

Friday Morning Music Club recital, works by Richard Strauss and Howard Blake. Noon, Calvary Baptist Church, 755 Eighth St. NW. Free. 202-333-2075.

The African Queen,” John Huston’s 1951 film classic, starring Humphrey Bogart and Katharine Hepburn, about a grizzled skipper and a spinster who set out to sink a German gunboat during World War I. 1 p.m., National Museum of American History, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Songwriters: The Next Generation, performances by composer-saxophonist Camille Thurman and songwriter-vocalist Rebecca Jordan. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

An Evening with James Prosek, after a screening of “Picture the Leviathan,” about the artist’s work and commitment to conservation, he discusses the Ocean Fishes project. 6:30 p.m., National Academy of Sciences Auditorium, 2101 Constitution Ave. NW. Free, registration and photo ID required: www.cpnas, org. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org.

“Duke 91 & 92: Back to Back,” a documentary about Duke’s back-to-back national championships. 7 p.m., Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. Free. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org.

Theater: “Hello, Dolly!,” the popular Broadway musical, starring Nancy Opel and Edward Gero. 7:30 p.m. Thursdays, 2 and 7:30 p.m. most Fridays-Saturdays, 7:30 p.m. Mondays through Wednesdays, through May 18. Ford’s Theatre, 511 10th St. NW. $18-$77; discounts for groups, seniors, military and age 35 and younger. 202-347-4833 or www.fords.org.

U.S. Army Band Concert, a music program from “The Great American Songbook.” 8 p.m., Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free tickets available by phone, with a $2.80 service charge per ticket. 202-397-7328 or 202-707-5502.

“Xanadu,” Craig Cipollini directs the Gay Men’s Chorus of Washington in the musical fantasy, based on a movie that starred Olivia Newton-John. 8 p.m. Friday-Saturday, 3 p.m. Sunday, George Washington University, Lisner Auditorium, 730 21st St. NW. $20-$55. 202-293-1548.

Saturday, MARCH 16

“The Adventures of Polly Pedestrian” puppet show, Ricardo, the Cavalier Raccoon, teaches Polly about traffic, pedestrian and bicycle safety; in English and Spanish. 9:30 and 11 a.m., National Theatre, 1321 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free ticket, one per person, distributed 30 minutes before each show. 202-783-3372.

The Last Days of Pompeii, Georgetown University art history teacher discusses the destruction of the vibrant Roman resort on the Amalfi coast, the eruption of Mount Vesuvius on August 24, 79 A.D., and tells how it has inspired design trends and the creation of art and works of literature. 9:30 a.m. to 3:15 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $130. 202-633-3030.

Beyond basic genealogy, archivist Claire Kluskens discusses federal records relating to the American Revolution. 10 a.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Winter bird walk, National Park Service rangers lead walks to identify and learn more about birds; binoculars and guides provided. 10 a.m.-noon and 2-4 p.m., Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial, Ohio Drive NW. Free. Robert Steele, 202-438-9574.

Walk and Talk: Spring in the Asian Collections, horticulturist Chris Upton leads a long tour and discusses familiar, rare and unusual flora over the 13 acres of hillside and unpaved trails. 10 a.m.-noon, U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. $15; registration required. 202-245-4521.

The Cinderella No One Knows: The Fairy Tale World of the Brothers Grimm, Folklorist, storyteller and poet Margaret R. Yocom discusses why Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm were drawn to folktales, how they planned to foster German unity and educate the country’s children and parents with their tales by recounting them and inviting participants to consider the power of storytelling in their own lives; a screening and discussion of the German film “Mother Hulda,” based on a Grimm fairy tale, little known in the U.S., follow a midday break. Co-Sponsored with the Goethe-Institut. 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Goethe-Institut, 812 Seventh St. NW. $130. 202-633-3030.

“Cinderella Moon,” for age 10 and older, a film version of the fairy tale, set in eighth-century China but with a modern message. 10:30 a.m. Saturday, 11:30 a.m. Sunday, National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-789-4995.

Bonsai repotting workshop, take no more than one large or two small bonsai each; soil and tools provided. 1-4 p.m., U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. $29, registration required. 202-245-5307.

David and Marian Bell Fairchild, author and cherry blossom expert Ann McClellan discusses the botanist and his wife, the daughter of Alexander Graham Bell, and their dedication to the flowering trees. 1 p.m., U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. $12, registration required. 202-245-4521 or www.usna.usda.gov.

Artist talk, local designer Hiroshi Jacobs explores space and dimension in his latest installment with collaborator and fellow artist Casey Hughes. 1:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, Third Floor, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Portrait Gallery talk, biographer Justin Martin shows how the lives of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman and H. H. Richardson are tied to his latest subject, pioneering landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted. 2 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

“Marseille, the Old Port” (1923), a silent film with live music, the story of a Marseille barmaid who tries to flee her lover for another, in French with English subtitles; musical accompaniment by Alexandre Wimmer. 2 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6799.

“Knit and Lit,” informal group of knitters and readers; take a knitting or needlework project to work on as you share patterns and stories. 3 p.m. Saturdays, Georgetown Library, 3307 M St. NW. Free. 202-724-8783.

Slavic Soul Party!, the New York-based brass band creates an acoustic mash-up of Balkan and Gypsy sounds with North American music. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“My Louisiana Love,” Sharon Linezo Hong’s modern-day story of love, loss and resilience, following a woman’s quest to find a place in her Native American community. 7 p.m., National Museum of the American Indian, Fourth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Free, registration encouraged: www.nmai.si.edu/calendar. 202-633-1000.

Jack DeJohnette 70th birthday tour, performs with double-neck guitarist David Fiuczynski, pianist George Colligan and bass player Jerome Harris. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $35. 202-467-4600.

Kodo Drummers, a performance by the traditional Japanese drum troupe. 8 p.m., DAR Constitution Hall, 18th and C streets NW. $25-$50. 202-785-9727 or www.wpas.org.

Improvisational comedy, Georgetown Improv Association presents comedy inspired by suggestions from the audience, contains adult themes. 9 p.m., Georgetown University, Leavey Center, Bulldog Alley, 37th and O streets NW. $6; seniors and students, $4. 202-687-2787.

Sunday, MARCH 17

Social reconciliation discussion, cathedral dean Gary Hall leads and psychologist Lauren Abramson discuss the place of reconciliation in society. 10:10 a.m., Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

“Mother Nature’s Child,” a documentary exploring nature’s role in children’s health and development. 11:30 a.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $12; students, $10. 202-272-2448. Registration: www.nbm.org.

Urban river films, “Rock the Boat,” about transforming city landscapes to benefit the environment, 12:30 p.m.; “The Anacostia River,” and several short films, 1:45 p.m. National Museum of American History, Warner Bros. Theater, 14th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org.

Portraits in Design: Daniel H. Burnham, Judith McBrien, director of the film “Make No Little Plans,” discusses the architect’s work, focusing on his plans for Chicago and Washington, D.C. 1-3 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. $20; students, $12. 202-272-2448 or www.nbm.org.

Honoring Asian viewing stone traditions, artistic stones from the private collections of Potomac Viewing Stone Group members displayed with great reverence according to aesthetic standards developed in China and Japan. 1-2:30 p.m., U.S. National Arboretum, 3501 New York Ave. NE. Free. 202-245-4521.

Art talk, Oskar Batschmann discusses Benjamin West, John Singleton Copley aand the Revolution of the European Art System. 2 p.m., National Gallery of Art, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-737-4215.

Portrait Story Days: Patience Wright, listen to a story about the sculptor and Revolutionary wartime spy and create a special piece of art. 2-5 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

“Wild Things,” a documentary about progressive ranchers learning to peacefully coexist with coyotes, wolves and other native carnivores. 3 p.m., Carnegie Institution for Science, Elihu Root Auditorium, 1530 P St. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org .

Classical piano duets, pianists Wen-Yin Chan and Hanchien Lee perform works by Mozart, Saint-Saens and Gershwin; a reception and art exhibit, “Light,” by the group Art Spirit follow. Concert. 3 p.m., reception, 4:30 p.m. Metropolitan Memorial United Methodist Church, 3401 Nebraska Ave. NW. Free. 202-363-4900.

Russian Chamber Arts Society, mezzo-soprano Susana Poretsky and tenor Michael Manevich perform; a reception follows. 3 p.m., American University, Katzen Arts Center, Abramson Family Recital Hall, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. $40. 202-885-3634 or www.thercas.com.

“For the Best and for the Onion,” a film about the farmers of Galmi, Niger, who grow the most prized onions in West Africa. 4 p.m., National Museum of Natural History, Baird Auditorium, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org .

James Galway, the noted Irish flutist performs with wife Jeanne and pianist Michael McHale. 4 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $28-$85. 202-785-9727.

Gregory Crewdson: Brief Encounters,” a film about the photographer and his unusual shots of abandoned factory towns and suburban neighborhoods. 4:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, East Building Concourse, Auditorium, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org .

Cathedral organ recital, Marek Kudlicki performs works by Bach and others. 5:15 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Suggested donation, $10. 202-537-6200 or www.nationalcathedral.org.

“Old Man and the Moose,” a documentary about Harri, an man whose dream comes true when he makes a show of presenting his ears to the animals and mimics their groaning and moaning as the animals come and go freely in and out of the camera’s view, in Estonian with English subtitles. 5:30 p.m., Carnegie Institution for Science, Elihu Root Auditorium, 1530 P St. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org.

St. Patrick’s Day dance concert, students from Maryland’s Culkin School of Traditional Irish Dance perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Inscape Chamber Orchestra concert, Richard Scerbo conducts a performance of works by Debussy, Ravel and others; latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Monday, MARCH 18

Lady at the O.K. Corral,” Ann Kirschner discusses her book about Josephine Marcus Earp, the common-law wife of Western hero Wyatt Earp. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, African and Middle Eastern Division Reading Room, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-3779.

Poetry Out Loud finals, for the National Recitation Contest, students from across the city compete to represent the District at the national finals next month. Free. National Portrait Gallery, McEvoy Auditorium, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Washington National Opera Singer Showcase, main stage artists and members of the Domingo-Cafritz Young Artist Program perform. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

“Potomac: The River Runs Through Us,” a documentary about the current condition of the river; and “Chattahoochee: From Water War to Water Vision,” about the struggle for water among Georgia, Florida and Alabama. 6:30 p.m., Sidwell Friends School, Meeting House, 3825 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org.

“Where the Yellowstone Goes,” a fly-fishing guide leads a 30-day drift boat expedition down the free-flowing river. 6:30 p.m., Department of the Interior, Yates Auditorium, 1849 C St. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org .

Washington International Competition for voice, the final round during which six singers perform 20-minutes sets of vocal selections. 7 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. Free tickets distributed in front of the theater. 202-467-4600.

Go-Go music: the history and evolution of D.C.’s legendary beat, Kip Lornell chronicles the development and ongoing popularity of the only musical form indigenous to Washington, D.C. 7 p.m., Corcoran Gallery of Art, 500 17th St. NW. $10. 202-639-1700.

Tuesday, MARCH 19

Latin America’s Opulent Orchids, orchid collection specialist Tom Mirenda leads a pre-opening museum tour of “Orchids of Latin America,” in a Mexico courtyard where the balconies, trees and fountain drip with orchids, through an orchid reserve and on to a vanilla vine-draped hut where activities and resources offer more information about this most prized and beautiful of blooms, and discusses his work with orchids, and the complexities of designing an exhibit with live collections. 8:30-10 a.m. Tuesday, March 21 and 27, tour meets in the Constitution Ave. entrance lobby, National Museum of Natural History, 10th Street and Constitution Avenue NW. $35. 202-633-3030.

Declassification of NATO records, supervisory archivist Neil Carmichael discusses the declassification of NATO records in recognition of the agency’s 64th anniversary. 11 a.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

“Hot Tuna,” a documentary about the Atlantic bluefin tuna, now being fished to the brink of extinction. Noon, National Geographic, 17th and M streets NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org .

Show Boat” lecture, Todd Decker of Washington University, St. Louis, discusses the making of the classic Broadway musical by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein II. Noon, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-5502.

Sketching workshop, take pencils and a sketchbook, work with objects on display in the Luce Foundation Center. 3-4:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Smithsonian American Art Museum, Luce Foundation Center, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Homework cafe, a quiet place for students in grades kindergarten through 12 to work on homework assignments. 3-5 p.m. Tuesdays, Tenley-Friendship Library, 4450 Wisconsin Ave. NW. Free. 202-727-1488.

Tippi toes hip-hop dance class, for ages 7 and older; learn choreography and dances. 5:30-6:15 p.m. Tuesdays through May 7, Hill Center at the Old Naval Hospital, 921 Pennsylvania Ave. SE. $75 per month plus $30 registration fee. 202-549-4172 or www.hillcenterdc.org .

Eya Medieval music for high voices, beautiful and ethereal plainchant and Conductus from the Mongpellier and Worcester manuscripts from the 13th century. 12:10 p.m., Church of the Epiphany, 1317 G St. NW. Suggested donation, $5. 202-347-2635, Ext. 20.

Tax assistance, for Ward 4 individuals and businesses filing individual taxes, real property homestead, real property assessments, real property senior deduction and tax resolution, hosted by the Office of Tax and Revenue. 1:30-5 p.m., Petworth Library, 4200 Kansas Ave. NW. Free. 202-243-1188.

Classical music concert, members of the National Symphony Orchestra Youth Fellowship Program perform music featuring French horn player Scott Reid, violist Sam Matzner and cellist Didi Park. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

The Bourne Identity,” 2002 film based on a novel by Robert Ludlum, starring Matt Damon and Franka Potente. 6 p.m., Georgetown Library, 3260 R St. NW. Free. 202-727-0232.

Choral concert, the Capitol Hill Youth Choir and the British School of Washington perform songs from Broadway musicals, followed by a reception and community sing-along. 6-7:30 p.m., Capitol Hill Arts Workshop, 545 Seventh St. SE. Free. 202-547-6839 or www.chaw.org.

Bellevue teen chess club, for players of all skill levels. 6 p.m. Tuesdays, William O. Lockridge/Bellevue Library, 115 Atlantic St. SW. Free. 202-243-1184.

Secrets of the Animal Keepers, Paul Marinari, a curator at Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, and several colleagues discuss how keepers cater to the daily needs of various species that need a wide range of skills, habitats and care routines that keep animals healthy, happy and thriving. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

An Evening with Chris Palmer, a screening of the adaptation of his book, “Shooting in the Wild: An Insider’s Account of Making Movies in the Animal Kingdom.” 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, 3rd Floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

Puccini Opera, the Riverbend Opera performs “Il Trittico,” and “Suor Angelica,” the stories of a dark murder and a lovely but sad soap, respectively, sponsored by the Southwest Chamber Players. 7:30 p.m., St. Augustine’s Episcopal Church, Sixth Street and Maine Avenue SW. Donations appreciated. 703-893-0183 or 202-484-6354.

Wednesday, MARCH 20

Geneology research, reference archivist Constance Potter discusses how to use papers from the Continental Congress. 11 a.m., National Archives, 700 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

“How To Put Your Brain on the Internet,” Michael Chorost discusses his experience with the Cochlear Implant. 11:30 a.m., Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mumford Room, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-7450.

Gallery talk, Janice Ruth of the manuscript division discusses Clara Barton’s work during the Civil War. Noon, “The Civil War in America” exhibit, Library of Congress, Southwest Gallery, Jefferson Building, 10 First St. SE. Free. 202-707-9203.

“Blue Alchemy: Stories of Indigo,” a documentary about a blue dye that has captured the imagination for millennia, filmed in seven countries. Noon, George Washington University, Marvin Center Amphitheater, 800 21st St. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.dcenvironmentalfilmfest.org.

Whatever Happened to the Washington Reporters, 1978-2012,” Stephen Hess discusses his book. Noon, Library of Congress, Madison Building, Mary Pickford Theater, 101 Independence Ave. SE. Free. 202-707-5221.

American craft masterpieces, Oscar Fitzgerald, Smithsonian/George Mason University, History of Decorative Arts, discusses James Krenov’s “Cabinet.” Noon, Renwick Gallery, 17th Street and Pennsylvania Avenue NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Fear Itself: The New Deal and the Origins of Our Time,” Ira Katznelson discusses his book. Noon, National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Piano recital, Paul Posnak performs works by Gershwin and other composers. 12:10 p.m., latecomers not admitted. 6:30 p.m., National Gallery of Art, West Building Garden Court, Fourth Street and Constitution Avenue NW. Free. 202-842-6941.

Betty Carter’s “Jazz Ahead,” emerging jazz artists complete their residency with a concert. 6 p.m., Kennedy Center, Millennium Stage, 2700 F St. NW. Free. 202-467-4600.

Love, trust, risk: Painting the “Papered Century,” a lecture by Nina Dubin, associate professor of art history, University of Illinois, Chicago. 6:15 p.m., George Washington University Smith Hall of Art, Room 114, 801 22nd St. NW. Free. 202-994-6085.

The Films of Nam June Paik, a series of curated film and video works by Nam June Paik and his contemporaries, listings at www.AmericanArt.si.edu/calendar/. 6:30 p.m., Smithsonian American Art Museum, McEvoy Auditorium, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

The Real NCIS, David Lobb, NCIS special agent, and Lou Eliopulos, chief of the forensic sciences division, discuss the agency’s mission, stories from the field and its unique forensic approach to current and cold-case investigations. 6:45 p.m., U.S. Navy Memorial, Naval Heritage Center, 701 Pennsylvania Ave. NW. $45. 202-633-3030.

“The Age of Aluminum,” a documentary about the metal that has become part of our daily lives, but could also pose health risks. 7 p.m., Carnegie Institution for Science, Elihu Root Auditorium, 1530 P St. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.environmentalfilm.org .

Student Environmental Short Film Festival, several films, followed by a discussion with the filmmakers. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, 3rd Floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

Country music concert, singer-songwriter Bob DiPiero leads an evening of music from members of the Country Music Association. 8 p.m., Library of Congress, Coolidge Auditorium, 10 First St. SE. Free tickets available by phone, with a $2.80 service charge per ticket. 202-397-7328 or 202-707-5502.

“The Little Room,” a film about a man who refuses to go to a retirement home and his caregiver; in French with English subtitles. 8 p.m., Avalon Theatre, 5612 Connecticut Ave. NW. $11; students, $9; seniors, $8.25; age 12 and younger, $8. 202-966-6000.

Rachmaninoff songs and arias, performed by baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky. 8 p.m., Kennedy Center, Concert Hall, 2700 F St. NW. $45-$100. 202-785-9727.

Thursday, MARCH 21

“Professor Wingnut Wants to Fly,” for ages 4-8, take off with Professor Wingnut and Seymour the Seagull in this interactive musical. 10:15 and 11:15 a.m. and 12:15 p.m. March 21-22, National Air and Space Museum, Sixth Street and Independence Avenue SW. Discovery Theater at S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $8; ages 2-16, $6; 1 and younger, $3. 202-633-8700 or www.discoverytheater.org .

Rethinking Urban Rivers in an Age of Climate Change, environmental policy writer and Smithsonian consultant on urban waterways John R. Wennersten discusses how rivers fit into local and global public policy. 12:30 p.m., National Building Museum, 401 F St. NW. Free, registration required. 202-272-2448.

“Seeking the Greatest Good: The Conservation Legacy of Gifford Pinchot,” a documentary that chronicles the increasingly valuable legacy of Pinchot’s philosophy of conservation and sustainability, a conversation with V. Alaric Sample, president of the Pinchot Institute for Conservation, follows the screening. 5:30 p.m., National Portrait Gallery, McEvoy Auditorium, Eighth and F streets NW. Free. 202-633-1000.

Collections objects on display, highlighting the Japanese eye for beauty, Asian-themed menu of savories and cherry treats, two bar beverages and signature cocktail served in the Townhouse, for age 21 and older. 6-8 p.m., Tudor Place, 1644 31st St. NW. $25. Register: http://japaneseeyeforbeauty.eventbrite.com/. 202-965-0400.

Jancis Robinson Toasts American Wines, the celebrated international wine guru American Wine, co-author of “The Ultimate Companion to the Wines and Wineries of the United States,” tells the story of how many Americans have conquered an area of expertise once regarded as quintessentially European and trades insights, tasting notes, and tips in an interview with Washington Post wine columnist Dave McIntyre. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $75. 202-633-3030.

Supersymmetry: The Next Big Discovery?, David Kaplan, Johns Hopkins University department of physics and astronomy, discusses the latest research in space and time, supersymmetry and more. 6:45 p.m., S. Dillon Ripley Center, 1100 Jefferson Dr. SW. $42. 202-633-3030.

“OK, I’ve Watched the Film, Now What?” Chris Palmer shows clips from inspiring films and moderates a discussion, exploring ways we can turn films into action at both the policy and personal levels. 7 p.m., American University, Wechsler Theater, 3rd Floor, Mary Graydon Center, 4400 Massachusetts Ave. NW. Free. 202-885-3408 or www.filmmakersforconservation.org.

“Earth Days,” filmmaker Robert Stone introduces his documentary, a look back to the dawn and development of the modern environmental movement. 7 p.m., National Archives, McGowan Theater, Constitution Avenue and Ninth Street NW. Free. 202-357-5000.

Classical viola recital, Ori Kam performs. 7:30 p.m., Kennedy Center, Terrace Theater, 2700 F St. NW. $30. 202-467-4600.

“You’re Such a Martyr!” Candida Moss, a specialist in biblical studies and early Christian history, discusses the history of persecution in the early Christian church and some falsehoods that eventually became part of church rhetoric. 7:30 p.m., Washington National Cathedral, Front Nave, Wisconsin and Massachusetts avenues NW. Free, tickets required: invitation@cathedral.org. 202-537-6200.

— Compiled by Gerri Marmer

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