D.C. lawmakers are scheduled to vote Tuesday on removing the city’s sole remaining voting representative to the board of the Metro transit agency, the latest fallout in the ongoing ethics scandal involving D.C. Council member and former Metro board chairman Jack Evans (D-Ward 2).

The representative, Corbett Price, was appointed by Mayor Muriel E. Bowser (D) and has twice been confirmed by the council. A longtime health-care executive, Price was billed as a corporate turnaround expert who could help improve the troubled transportation system.

But he has come under fire recently for his role in Metro’s handling of an ethics investigation into Evans, who last week stepped down as the board’s chairman while continuing to occupy his seat on the council.

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Price was part of the four-member ethics committee that commissioned an outside law firm to investigate whether Evans’s role on the transit board and his work as a consultant presented conflicts of interest.

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After the report was completed, Price — along with Evans and Evans’s attorney, Mark Tuohey — falsely stated that the committee had determined that Evans committed no ethics violations.

Emergency legislation filed Wednesday by council member Elissa Silverman (I-At Large) would strip Price of the Metro board position he has held since 2015. “Mr. Price’s purposeful misstatements constituted a breach of the public’s trust,” the bill states.

Silverman said she was advancing the bill as an emergency measure — rather than going through the normal and more protracted legislative process — because of “a sense of urgency that we should have honest, truthful representatives on the Metro board.”

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“I think an important thing we need to do is regain credibility on the Metro board,” she said.

Price did not return calls Wednesday. A spokeswoman for Bowser, who has previously praised Price’s work on the board, did not respond to requests for comment.

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Paul Smedberg, who represents Virginia on the Metro board and succeeded Evans as chair last week, said it was up to the District to pick its board members.

If Price is removed, one of the city’s alternate board members would fill his slot until Bowser nominates a replacement who is confirmed by the council.

The ethics committee found Evans guilty of a violation for failing to disclose a conflict of interest related to Colonial Parking, a company that was paying $50,000 a year to Evans’s consulting firm.

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According to the law firm’s investigation, he also shared internal transit agency information with a Colonial executive and repeatedly spurred the agency’s inspector general to investigate a rival parking company.

Evans, who is the subject of an ongoing federal probe and whose house was recently searched by the FBI, defended the arrangement and called the law firm’s findings misleading during an address to fellow council members Tuesday.

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Price has said he believed Evans resolved the ethics violation by amending his Metro disclosure statements to list Colonial Parking as a client.

“Once he did that, in my opinion, there’s no ethics violation — it’s been cured,” Price said June 27. “It’s the first time anybody has called me a liar.”

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Price, along with his relatives and companies, has given more than $35,000 in political donations to Bowser, campaign finance records show.

He was the executive chairman of a consulting company that managed the District’s public hospital, United Medical Center, under a multimillion-dollar contract with the D.C. government.

Council members voted to eliminate that contract in November 2017, after The Washington Post reported on questionable patient deaths and financial problems at the hospital.

Fenit Nirappil contributed to this report.

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