The Washington Post

Federal education bill a departure from No Child Left Behind

The federal education bill House Republicans approved Friday is a departure the from current law, known as No Child Left Behind, in several ways. The bill:

■ Eliminates the current accountability system, called adequate yearly progress, which requires all students to be proficient in reading and math by next year.

■ Deletes a provision known as “maintenance of effort,” which ensures that states use federal money in addition to, and not as a replacement for, state and local money to help low-income, minority and disabled students and English learners.

■ Allows federal money sent to high-poverty schools, known as Title 1, to follow the students if they enroll in a different public school, even if that school is well funded and does not have many poor students.

■ Does not require schools to evaluate teachers.

■ Lets districts and states set their academic expectations for schools and then decide what, if anything, to do about schools that do not perform.

■ Sets education funding at sequestration levels, cutting more than $1 billion from public education next year.

■ Keeps the requirement that schools test students in math and reading annually in grades 3 through 8 and once in high school, and make those results publicly available by subgroup.



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