As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, tens of thousands of baseball fans lined up outside Griffith Stadium on Georgia Avenue NW to buy tickets for the Oct. 4, 1924, opener. It was a woman, Elizabeth “Elsie” Tydings of 728 Sixth St. NW, who nabbed the first one.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, famous gate-crasher James “One-Eye” Connelly arrived in town. Connelly was notorious for never paying admission to a sporting event. As Washington ballplayer Nick Altrock later reminisced: “He was the first gate-crasher to devise the system of walking into a ballpark backward, so they would think he was coming out.”

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, some Washingtonians complained that “certain prominent folk” were getting all the good tickets while regular fans were getting stiffed. Not so, said team owner Clark Griffith: “All applications for World Series tickets filed with the Washington base ball club have been taken care of as well as humanly possible.”

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, agents from the Department of Internal Revenue fanned out downtown, on the lookout for scalpers who were allegedly selling $1.90 grandstand tickets for $50.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, a soldier injured in the Great War — “helpless and palsied and in his early twenties” — showed up at Griffith Stadium hoping for a job selling peanuts. He could not afford a ticket, and it was the only way he could see a game. He was lost in the crush, but when Estelle Brown read the veteran’s story in that evening’s paper, she dropped a ticket at the Star office for him.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, veterans of the U.S. Army’s 1st Infantry Division fretted. President Calvin Coolidge was scheduled to deliver the remarks at the dedication of their new monument on the afternoon of Oct. 4. But that was when the Washington ballclub would be taking on the New York Giants, and everyone knew Coolidge would rather be there. They decided to switch the dedication to the morning so the president could do both.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, Jelleff’s ladies’ clothing store at 12th and F NW put its bobbed wool sweater coats on sale for $7.50. “These are the coats girls want this Fall for foot ball games, and to wear tomorrow for the beginning of the World Series,” they proclaimed.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, Gibson’s, a store at Ninth and G NW, announced special pricing on batteries, headphones and tubes for radios. “Don’t be short when you occupy your grandstand seat at home,” the proprietors counseled in a newspaper advertisement.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, it was revealed that friars at a cloistered Dominican monastery in Brookland near Catholic University had a radio they planned to crowd around.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, Walter Johnson’s mother, his wife and two of his children traveled from the family’s home in Coffeyville, Kan., to watch the Big Train pitch. The Johnsons checked in at the Arlington Hotel on Vermont Avenue NW.

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, B.D. Terry of Los Angeles hopped on a train determined, wrote the Evening Star, “to come East at once to see the series. He has entered for the honor of being the first fan from a distance to reach Washington.”

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, Col. George Harvey accepted The Washington Post’s invitation to write about the opening game. “Professionally, I am somewhat out of practice,” wrote Harvey, a former U.S. diplomat and journalist from New England. “The last game I reported was played … on the Fourth of July, 1883 …. I cannot write as well now as I could then, but if there have been no changes in the rules meanwhile I shall have no difficulty in keeping the score.”

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, the Rev. Hugh Stevenson, pastor of Bethany Church at Second and Rhode Island NW, prepared two sermons to be delivered the day after the opener. His 11 a.m. sermon was titled “Rallying for Christ.” His 8 p.m. sermon was titled “The World Series.”

As Washington prepared to host its first-ever World Series, the Richmond Times Dispatch told its readers: “It’s against the Virginia law to bet, but we wish we knew just for the fun of it who is going to win the World Series.”

Twitter: @johnkelly

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