Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan on Thursday selected members of a nonpartisan commission created to redraw the state’s 6th Congressional District, a move that complies with a federal court order invalidating the current boundaries — which is being appealed by Attorney General Brian E. Frosh (D).

In a news release, Hogan (R) said the nine-member Emergency Commission on Sixth Congressional District Gerrymandering will recommend new boundaries for the district, which begins in deep-blue Montgomery and stretches through conservative Western Maryland.

The seat is being vacated in January by Rep. John Delaney (D), who will be replaced by Rep.-elect David Trone (D).

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A three-judge panel unanimously found that Democratic mapmakers violated the First Amendment rights of Republican voters when redistricting the once solidly Republican area in 2011.

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Frosh has asked the Supreme Court to reverse that decision, arguing that the political shift of the district could be attributed to other factors.

But Hogan agreed with the federal ruling, which gave the state until March 7 to redraw the lines.

“Free and fair elections are the very foundation of American democracy and the most basic promise that those in power can pledge to the citizens we represent,” Hogan said in a statement. “This nonpartisan redistricting commission will result in a fair, open, and transparent redistricting process for the sixth congressional district.”

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Hogan’s office announced the appointments of six members to the commission on Thursday — two Republicans, two Democrats and two political independents.

The Republicans are Maury S. Epner, a former prosector who lives in Montgomery, and Deborah Lundahl, a member of the Frederick County Ethics Commission.

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The Democrats are Christopher Howard, an Anne Arundel County resident who teaches computer science and technology at the University of Maryland University College, and Luis T. Gutierrez, Jr., a consultant to medical product developers in Montgomery County.

The two appointees who are political independents are Matthew Douglas, a senior policy analyst for the Federal Housing Finance Agency who lives in Montgomery, and Kathleen Jo Parson Tabor, who lives in Howard County and also serves on the Maryland Horse Industry Board.

Last month, Hogan named as the commission’s co-chairs former U.S. district judge Alexander Williams (D) and Walter Olson, a Republican who is a senior fellow at the CATO Institute’s Center for Constitutional Studies.

Ashley Oleson, an independent who works as an administrator for League of Women Voters, was also appointed to the commission last month.

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