Deonte Carraway, 22, a volunteer at Judge Sylvania Woods Elementary school in Glenarden, Md., has admitted to making child pornography with at least 10 students during the school day. (WUSA9)

A meeting at a Prince George’s County elementary school roiled by child pornography charges drew hundreds of parents and grandparents Thursday night, many of them angry and demanding to know how a school volunteer was able to make videos of children performing sex acts on school grounds during the school day.

Police initially identified 10 victims in the case, but by Thursday that number had grown to 12, and officials in the suburban Maryland county said they think more victims may be identified as the investigation continues.

Deonte Carraway, 22, of Glenarden had been volunteering at Judge Sylvania W. Woods Elementary since September. He has been charged with 10 counts of felony child pornography and has admitted creating dozens of videos, in which he sometimes can be seen or heard directing children ages 9 to 13 to perform sex acts, police said.

On Thursday night, parents and grandparents filled nearly every folding chair in the multipurpose room at Sylvania Woods, in Glenarden. Spanish-speaking parents formed a line to receive headsets translating officials’ remarks, but officials ran out after distributing more than three dozen.

Deonte Carraway (Prince George's County Police Department)

As the program got underway, parents had pointed questions for school personnel and law enforcement officials. A grandparent of three children at Sylvania Woods asked how Carraway could have been so unsupervised that he was able to produce the videos at school.

“I have those very same questions about how these things can happen when there are other adults in the school,” schools chief executive Kevin Maxwell said. “I don’t have those answers,” adding that investigators are examining the issue.

Other parents asked about Carraway’s hiring, about background checks for adults in the school, and about efforts to improve security for students in and around school bathrooms. They also asked whether the school system would assist in transferring victimized students to other schools and whether the principal, Michelle Williams, would lose her job.

Maxwell said officials have been “hearing that people did not properly report things” and he vowed to “retrain every employee in the school system.” He told parents that any employees found not to have fulfilled their responsibilities will be dealt with accordingly, but he said he could not answer whether Williams will be retained.

Detectives stood shoulder to shoulder against one wall, prepared to share case information with parents. Scott Hinckley of the FBI’s Baltimore field office said that every person in the child sex crimes squad is working the case and will continue following leads to find more victims. “It’s going to take a long time to get to the bottom of this,” Hinckley said.

The meeting stretched for more than two hours after Prince George’s officials said they would stay until parents has asked all of their questions. Over and over, officials said they could not answer because of the ongoing investigation, a refrain that parents eventually greeted with scoffing.

But the anguish was clear: One parent said she was afraid that her child was a victim, and there was nothing she could do to console him. Another said her daughter was scared to go to school. A third said that her child had spoken often about Carraway since the news of the investigation broke. “I am very scared,” the parent said.

The meeting came the same day that lawyers filed a class-action lawsuit against the county school board on behalf of all current and former students who were allegedly abused by Carraway. School officials have said that Carraway volunteered in the library, but the lawsuit alleges that Carraway told parents he directed the school choir — and that he then used that position to gain access to students, according to the lawsuit.

In the complaint, a fifth-grade boy alleges that Carraway removed students from classes to exploit them. The boy was part of the choir, which practiced on Friday evenings, the complaint says.

The allegations echo accusations made in a separate lawsuit that was filed Wednesday by the same lawyers on behalf of a 9-year-old boy, also a Sylvania Woods student.

A spokeswoman for the school system did not immediately respond Thursday evening to requests for a response to the lawsuits.

Besides the school board, both suits name Carraway and Williams, the principal, as defendants.

Williams, who has not responded to emailed requests for comment, has been placed on paid leave, a move that schools officials described as a cautionary measure given the ongoing investigation. A representative of the principals union said Wednesday that Williams had immediately reported concerns about Carraway to police and Child Protective Services when she became aware of them.

Anyone who works at a school is required to immediately report suspicions of sexual abuse to the county’s protective services division, and to follow up with a written report within 48 hours, according to the school system’s written procedures.

Carraway is being held on $1 million bond. In addition to the videos made at Sylvania Woods, police said recordings occurred at Glenarden Municipal Center, the Theresa Banks Memorial Aquatic Center and in homes.

Carraway’s family released a statement expressing shock and sorrow and promising to continue cooperating with investigators. “As a family who loves him dearly, we must stress that we do not condone the behaviors in question that has victimized numerous families and brought unimaginable fear and sadness to our community as a whole,” the statement said.

Isabel Herrera left Thursday night’s meeting before it was over. She said she didn’t get the answers she wanted.

She said she had hoped to find out who was responsible for Carraway and why he had seemingly unfettered access to the children. She listened to the panel of school officials and questions through a headset that translated into Spanish all that was being said.

But Herrera said that even after hearing it in Spanish, what happened doesn’t make sense.

“The school principal is like the mother of a household — she is supposed to watch everything,” Herrera said. “I don’t know who was watching.”

Hamil R. Harris and Donna St. George contributed to this report. Investigators ask anyone with information about this case to call 800-CALL-FBI or 301-772-4930.