The man who served as sheriff of Norfolk for most of the past quarter-century has been accused in a federal indictment of handing out contracts for jail services in exchange for bribes.

Robert McCabe, 61, is accused of taking cash, a loan, travel, gifts and campaign contributions from contractors providing food and medical care to the city jail. Gerard Boyle, 64, founder of the Tennessee medical services company Correct Care Solutions, is also charged in the indictment, which was handed down Thursday. Both men were arrested Thursday and did not yet appear to have attorneys.

“The Sheriff’s Office offered the FBI full cooperation during its investigation,” a spokeswoman for the current sheriff, Joe Baron, said in a statement. “Out of respect for the on-going judicial process, we have no further comment at this time.

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McCabe was sheriff from 1994 to 2016, when he resigned after an unsuccessful mayoral campaign. According to the indictment in federal court in Norfolk, he gave preferential treatment and extra city funds to contractors and ask for gift cards, free catering, campaign contributions and various other gifts in return.

He negotiated privately with Boyle, according to prosecutors, and instructed employees to give his company inside information on potential contracts, including confidential bids from competitors. Boyle bought McCabe tickets to a Redskins game and a Brooks & Dunn concert, according to the indictment.

The contract for jail medical services was worth more than $3 million a year.

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Correct Care Solutions, now called Wellpath, continues to provide medical care at the Norfolk jail.

“The charges against Mr. Boyle are serious, and we have accepted his resignation from all positions with our company,” a Wellpath spokeswoman said in a statement, adding that the company was “selected as the jail’s healthcare provider in a competitive bidding process, in 2018, under the new leadership at the Norfolk City Jail.”

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The Louisiana-based food service contractor is not identified, but prosecutors say McCabe began soliciting bribes from the firm’s CEO as soon as he took office in 1994, in exchange for food contracts worth more than $1 million a year.

Former employees have accused McCabe of using his office for personal gain in the past; he has denied wrongdoing and said his resignation had nothing to do with bribery allegations.

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