An extensive sex abuse case has shaken Prince George’s County, where former school volunteer Deonte Carraway has been indicted on 270 counts in a child porn case that affected 23 victims. (WUSA9)

A grand jury indicted a former elementary school volunteer on 270 counts of child pornography and related charges in an extensive sex abuse scandal that shook Prince George’s County.

The indictment comes four months after Deonte Carraway, 22, was arrested in the wide-reaching case and increases the official victim count from 17 to 23.

Officials with the Prince George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office announced the indictment Wednesday and said the office also is conducting a tandem investigation to determine whether any adults at the school failed to report Carraway’s behavior and should be criminally charged as a result.

Prince George’s County State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks said the Carraway case is the largest indictment her office has handled since she took office in 2011. The material presented to the grand jury represents evidence from more than 100 videos and photos recorded over a roughly seven-month period, prosecutors said.

“It speaks to how horrible this case was and is,” Alsobrooks said.

At a news conference on June 29, the Prince George’s County State’s Attorney’s Office announced a grand jury indicted Deonte Carraway on 270 counts of child pornography and related charges. Carraway is a former elementary school volunteer. (WUSA)

Carraway, of Glenarden, abused or recorded children performing sex acts at Judge Sylvania W. Woods Elementary School, where he worked as a paid teacher’s aide before becoming a library volunteer, according to prosecutors. The incidents he is accused of occurred on school property during the school day or at the Glenarden Community Center, where he ran a local youth choir, prosecutors said.

Carraway visited the homes of many children involved in the case after their parents had asked him to babysit or tutor, the indictment states. He then told children that they were part of a club and that to remain members, they had to record themselves or let him record them performing explicit sexual acts on devices known as “the orange phone” and “the white phone,” the indictment states.

Carraway also victimized children at a public pool, at a Bowie church and in private homes, police have said.

The grand jury’s charges are in addition to 13 counts that federal authorities filed against Carraway earlier this year.

The group of children involved in the indictment announced Wednesday are between the ages of 9 and 13 and comprises 20 boys and 3 girls, although there could be additional victims, prosecutors said.

The indictment was built using what prosecutors characterized as their strongest evidence — mostly based on videos from phones Carraway allegedly distributed to children — in an effort, they said, to avoid adding to the children’s trauma by having them appear in court to testify.

“The effort in crafting this indictment was to try to minimize the impact on children,” said Thomas Degonia, a special assistant state’s attorney. “That’s not to say there aren’t many other children who may have been involved or affected.”

Prince George’s police and federal law enforcement officials said Carraway admitted to giving children phones and telling them to use the devices to send explicit images to him through an anonymous messaging app called Kik.

But in court filings, Carraway’s federal public defenders said their client’s confession should be tossed out because it was not given voluntarily and because Carraway did not fully understand his rights when speaking with police.

An attorney representing Carraway could not be immediately reached to comment Wednesday.

The case roiled parents in Prince George’s, particularly in the roughly 6,000-resident city of Glenarden where Carraway lived, worked and volunteered. Woods Elementary parents have specifically asked why Carraway was allegedly allowed to be alone with students at the school and why the abuse charged in the case was allowed to occur over the course of a year before law enforcement got involved. The principal and a teacher at the school were put on leave in the aftermath of Carraway’s arrest.

Alsobrooks also said the office is still working on a criminal investigation to determine “how these particular crimes were allowed to occur” and whether there were “other individuals that may have had knowledge of these acts.”

The case went to Prince George’s police after an uncle checking a student’s cellphone noticed inappropriate photos on the device and alerted authorities.

After Carraway’s arrest, the county school system launched a task force to review how employees are trained to identify and report suspected child abuse. The report, issued in May, stated that the system needed to make sweeping improvements to better protect students.

The report, however, did not address specifics of the Carraway investigation.

Prince George’s school officials said in a statement Wednesday that they appreciate the efforts of law enforcement agencies and look forward to Carraway being held accountable for his “heinous and horrifying crimes.” They said they would continue working on the task force’s recommendations to improve school safety.

The case has prompted at least six civil suits, including a class-action lawsuit against the county school system.

Donna St. George contributed to this report.