A former elementary school aide and community choir director instructed children on how to perform sex acts while he videotaped them in a band room at a Prince George’s County school, according to details of his guilty plea Monday.

Deonte Carraway, 23, entered the plea in U.S. District Court in Greenbelt almost one year after his Feb. 4 arrest in the wide-reaching sex abuse case that roiled the county and involves at least 23 children as young as 9.

Federal prosecutors said Carraway supplied children with cellphones and coerced them into recording sexual activities using the devices. Recordings and alleged sex acts occurred at Judge Sylvania W. Woods Sr. Elementary School in Glenarden, Md., in private homes, a church, a public pool and a Glenarden government building, police and prosecutors said.

He faces 60 to 100 years in prison as part of a plea agreement that a judge will consider at his sentencing hearing set for June 5.

On Monday, Carraway appeared in an orange prison uniform and only spoke when answering the judge's questions with a “Yes, ma'am” or “No, ma'am.”

In court, Carraway admitted to 15 incidents that involved 12 children, including an 11-year-old special needs boy. In one incident described by prosecutors, Carraway is heard on video in the band room at the elementary school directing the boy and a girl in explicit sex acts as he films.

At one point, when the judge asked Carraway about his condition and whether he was able to understand and answer the judge’s questions, he responded, “I feel good.”

A federal grand jury last year indicted Carraway on 15 counts of sexual exploitation of a minor to produce child pornography involving the dozen children. Carraway has also been indicted on 270 counts of child pornography and related charges in Prince George’s County. In total, local and federal investigators have said they believe Carraway abused at least 23 children.

The investigation into Carraway began after an uncle checking a student’s cellphone found inappropriate photos and alerted Prince George’s County police.

Carraway admitted to supplying children with phones and telling them to send explicit images of themselves through an anonymous messaging app, according to federal and local charging papers.

Carraway also admitted to providing children cellphones to send him explicit videos and told children that if they wanted to join what he called his AKA Club they had to send him images.

The case angered Woods Elementary parents, who asked Prince George’s County Public School’s officials why Carraway was allegedly allowed to be alone with students.

After Carraway’s arrest, a task force reviewing how school employees are trained to identify and report suspected child abuse issued a report saying the system should make sweeping improvements to better protect students.

Families of the children involved have filed at least nine civil suits against the school system or Glenarden officials, including at least one class-action lawsuit.

A grandmother of three children who attend Woods Elementary School arrived at federal court Monday hoping to watch Carraway’s hearing, but missed the proceedings.

The Washington Post does not usually identify individuals in sexual assaults without their agreement.

The grandmother said she is still not sure if her grandchildren were victimized in the case, but said they were often around Carraway as part of his choir.

“I would like to see him get the time he deserves,” she said.