Police arrested and charged a sixth suspect in a May 26 homicide that Montgomery County police said involved members of the MS-13 gang.

Jose Luis Lainez-Martinez, 26, is being held without bond on a first-degree murder charge. No attorney was listed for him in court records.

According to court documents, the homicide occurred when Francisco Medrano-Campos, a painter, left his Wheaton apartment and was ambushed by MS-13 gang members who had watched his movements and knew what time he left for work. He was shot multiple times at 7:06 a.m. and died on the scene, police said.

Weeks before the incident, Medrano-Campos had gotten into an argument with one of the suspects who had broken into his apartment and stolen $3,000 in cash and two video-game systems, court documents allege. Medrano-Campos reportedly fought back, demanding the suspect return what he stole and beating him with a lead pipe, the documents state.

“By all accounts, he was a hard-working guy who was headed to work that morning,” said Capt. Edward Pallas, director of the major crimes division at the Montgomery County Police Department, of Medrano-Campos.

Monday’s arrest of Lainez-Martinez is the latest related to the killing. On June 10, police arrested and charged five suspects — ages 19 to 21 — with one count each of first-degree murder. All were accused of playing different roles in the slaying, from lookouts to shooters, according to court documents. The suspects, Carlos Andres Orellana, 21, Daniel E. Huezo Landaverde, 19, Oscar Effrain Zavala-Urrea, 19, Romeo Almengor Oxlaj-Lopez, 20, and Victor Alfonso Cruz-Orellana, 21, are all being held without bond.

Four of the suspects — Orellana, Zavala-Urrea, Oxlaj-Lopez and Cruz-Orellana — entered the country illegally from Central America as unaccompanied minors and were transferred to the custody of the U.S. Office of Refugee Resettlement, an Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokeswoman previously told The Washington Post. ICE asked Montgomery jail officials to notify the agency if any of the four will be released from custody, a process known as a detainer that can lead to deportation.

Montgomery County police referred a call about the status of the latest defendant to the Department of Correction and Rehabilitation. Neither correction or ICE officials could be reached for comment.

Allen Wolf, the head public defender in Montgomery County, previously told The Post that his office probably would represent one of the suspects. He said he would contract with private attorneys to represent the others, which is common practice for a case that has multiple co-defendants who cannot afford private attorneys. Wolf could not be reached for comment Friday about the status of the case.

Dan Morse contributed to this report.