The rain wasn’t as bad as some forecasts expected, but Barry still dumped upwards of a foot of rain on parts of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama. The storm’s remnants will make their way north through Arkansas and is continues to pack a dangerous punch. Between 2 to 4 inches of rain are expected through the area with isolated pockets exceeding ten.

Earlier in the week, a storm dumped several inches of rain on New Orleans.

Precipitation since Wednesday

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How it unfolded

“There are three ways Louisiana floods: storm surge, high river and rain,” said Gov. John Bel Edwards (D). “We’re going to have all three.” Rainfall totals were projected to reach nearly 25 inches in some spots by the National Hurricane Center and serious inland flooding was feared.

Projected rainfall

2

4

6

10

15

20 in.

Mississippi

Mississippi River

Louisiana

Baton

Rouge

Lake

Charles

New Orleans

Lafayette

50 MILES

Sources: National Weather Service as of July 11

Projected rainfall

2

4

6

10

15

20 inches

Mississippi

Mississippi River

Louisiana

Baton

Rouge

Gulfport

Lake

Charles

Lafayette

New Orleans

50 MILES

Sources: National Weather Serviceas of July 11

Projected rainfall

2

4

6

10

15

20 inches

Ala.

Mississippi

Mississippi River

Texas

Mobile

Louisiana

Baton

Rouge

Gulfport

Lake

Charles

Lafayette

New Orleans

Beaumont

50 MILES

Sources: National Weather Service as of July 11

Projected rainfall

2

4

6

10

15

20 inches

Alabama

Mississippi

Mississippi River

Texas

Mobile

Louisiana

Baton

Rouge

Gulfport

Lake

Charles

Lafayette

New Orleans

Beaumont

Houston

50 MILES

Source: National Weather Service as of July 11

The heaviest rainfall was expected to pound the Baton Rouge area, where severe flooding in 2016 damaged more than 40,000 homes. Areas close to the intertidal zone, such as New Orleans, were forecast to be swamped by hours of rain as well as storm surges from the Gulf of Mexico.

NASA satellites captured images of the storm on Friday afternoon as it approached the Gulf Coast.

AL.

GA.

MS.

TEXAS

LA.

New Orleans

FLA.

200 MILES

AL.

GA.

MS.

TEXAS

LA.

New Orleans

FLA.

AL.

GA.

MS.

TEXAS

LA.

New Orleans

FLA.

200 MILES

AL.

GA.

MS.

TEXAS

LA.

New Orleans

FLA.

200 MILES

AL.

GA.

MS.

TEXAS

LA.

New Orleans

FLA.

200 MILES

Keeping up with the deluge

Water was the main concern with this storm. The city of New Orleans is surrounded by it — Lake Pontchartrain to the north and the Mississippi River to the south. Nearly all of the city sits below the levees that hold back the river in what amounts to a giant basin. And with this season’s extra soggy rains in the Midwest, the Mississippi River is high. On Friday it was at 17 feet, however it never got much higher. Twenty feet is considered a major flood.

Levees: 25 to 20 feet high

Pump

Station 1

and canal

Friday

afternoon:

16 feet

Downtown/

French

Quarter

Sea level

Mississippi River

west of the city

Mississippi River

east of the city

New Orleans

Diagram's height is exaggerated to illustrate

the difference in elevation

Levees: 25 to 20 feet high

Friday

afternoon:

16 feet

Downtown/

French

Quarter

Pump Station 1

and canal

Sea level

New Orleans

Mississippi River

west of the city

Mississippi River

east of the city

Diagram's height is exaggerated to illustrate the difference in elevation

Levees: 25 to 20 feet high

Pump Station 1

and canal

Downtown/

French Quarter

Friday afternoon: 16 feet

Sea level

New Orleans

Mississippi River

west of the city

Mississippi River

east of the city

Diagram's height is exaggerated to illustrate the difference in elevation

Levees: 25 to 20 feet high

Pump Station 1

and canal

Downtown/

French Quarter

Friday afternoon: 16 feet

Sea level

New Orleans

Mississippi River

west of the city

Mississippi River

east of the city

Diagram's height is exaggerated to illustrate the difference in elevation

Upgraded since Hurricane Katrina 14 years ago, pumping stations and a network of canals and pipelines attempt to keep the low-lying areas of the city dry. The big worry, however, was whether the system would be able to keep up with the deluge.

Levee

—Above sea level

—Sea Level

Flood gates

—Below sea level

Pumping station

Lake

Pontchartrain

CAUSEWAY

Eastern

New Orleans

Gentilly

Lakeview

Metairie

Fairgrounds

New Orleans

French

Quarter

Ninth

Ward

Algiers

Area shown in

cross-section above

Uptown

Gretna

Westwego

Harvey

2 MILES

Sources: Maps4News/HERE; National Levee Database, Atlas Louisiana GIS

Levee

—Above sea level

—Sea Level

Flood gates

—Below sea level

Pumping station

Lake

Pontchartrain

CAUSEWAY

Eastern

New Orleans

Gentilly

Lakeview

Metairie

Fairgrounds

New Orleans

French

Quarter

Ninth

Ward

Algiers

Area shown in

cross-section above

Uptown

Gretna

Westwego

Harvey

2 MILES

Sources: Maps4News/HERE; National Levee Database, Atlas Louisiana GIS

Levee

—Above sea level

Lake

Pontchartrain

—Sea Level

Flood gates

—Below sea level

Pumping station

Seabrook

Floodgate

CAUSEWAY

Eastern

New Orleans

Gentilly

Lakeview

Metairie

Fairgrounds

New Orleans

Ninth

Ward

French

Quarter

Algiers

Area shown

in cross-section

above

Bridge

City

Uptown

Gretna

Westwego

Harvey

2 MILES

West Closure

Complex

Sources: Maps4News/HERE; National Levee Database, Atlas Louisiana GIS

Levee

—Above sea level

Lake Pontchartrain

—Sea Level

Flood gates

—Below sea level

Pumping station

Seabrook

Floodgate

CAUSEWAY

Eastern

New Orleans

Gentilly

Lakeview

Metairie

Fairgrounds

New Orleans

Ninth

Ward

French

Quarter

Chalmette

Algiers

Area shown

in cross-section

above

Bridge

City

Uptown

Gretna

Avondale

Westwego

Harvey

2 MILES

West Closure

Complex

Sources: Maps4News/HERE; National Levee Database, Atlas Louisiana GIS

Levee

—Above sea level

Lake Pontchartrain

—Sea Level

Flood gates

—Below sea level

Pumping station

Seabrook

Floodgate

CAUSEWAY

Eastern

New Orleans

Gentilly

Lakeview

Metairie

Lake Borgne

Surge Barrier

Fairgrounds

New Orleans

Ninth

Ward

French

Quarter

Chalmette

Algiers

Area shown

in cross-section

above

Bridge

City

Uptown

Gretna

Avondale

Westwego

Belle Chase

Harvey

2 MILES

West Closure

Complex

Sources: Maps4News/HERE; National Levee Database, Atlas Louisiana GIS

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