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States that lifted coronavirus restrictions are reversing course as cases surge and hospitals fill up across the Sun Belt. The alarming spread “puts the entire country at risk,” Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s top infectious-diseases expert, told a Senate panel June 30. New infections have been numbering more than 40,000 a day and cases could “go up to 100,000 a day,” he warned, “if this does not turn around.”

Beaches and bars that reopened for Memorial Day are shutting back down for the Fourth of July. Masks are now required in many states and on all airlines. Governors in several states that were among the hardest hit in the opening months of the pandemic are requiring travelers from the new hot zones to self-quarantine upon arrival. School districts and universities are reevaluating plans for the fall.

Many Republican leaders are calling for Americans to wear masks even as President Trump refuses to wear one; he and Vice President Pence say they will continue to hold large reelection rallies. The United States accounts for a quarter of the world’s coronavirus cases, and the death toll is more than 126,000.

The Washington Post is tracking the extent of this reopening alongside the rate of new infections and will update this page frequently.

Alabama

  • Open now: Gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, restaurant and bar dine-in services, beaches and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 28, the governor issued a safer-at-home order beginning April 30. The order allowed many businesses to reopen, provided physical distancing and sanitation rules were followed. Beaches could reopen, but people must maintain six feet of distance, and gatherings of more than 10 people are not allowed. Restaurants and bars were still limited to takeout, curbside pickup or delivery under the order. Retail stores could reopen at 50 percent capacity.

On May 8, the governor amended the order to allow restaurants and bars to reopen with limited seating, along with gyms and fitness centers beginning May 11. She extended the order from May 15 to May 22. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops could also reopen provided they follow physical distancing guidelines.

On May 22 at 5 p.m., large entertainment venues, athletic activities, and school and child-care facilities were allowed to reopen with physical distancing guidelines and capacity limits. Entertainment venues include bowling alleys, arcades, casinos, theaters and concert venues.

Alaska

  • Now open: Places of worship, bars, restaurant dine-in services, theaters, retail stores, gyms and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.

On April 22, the governor announced the state would begin reopening businesses April 24, while still mandating physical distancing.

On May 8, the state began the second phase of its reopening plan, which allowed most nonessential businesses to reopen with limited capacity, including retail stores, fitness centers and bars.

On May 19, the governor said he would reopen his state entirely by May 22, ahead of Memorial Day weekend. He said the state would be skipping from Phase 2 of its reopening and going straight to Phase 4, allowing bars, theaters and gyms to resume business without any kind of capacity restrictions. The largest city, Anchorage, and the capital, Juneau, continue to limit capacity.

Arizona

  • Now open: Elective surgeries, casinos, gyms, major league sports without fans, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs.

On April 22, the governor issued an order that elective surgeries could resume May 1.

On April 29, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while also allowing retail businesses to begin selling goods May 4, with certain restrictions. Cosmetologists and barbers began resuming appointment-based services May 8, while restaurants and coffee shops began resuming dine-in services May 11, with certain restrictions.

On May 13, gyms and pools were allowed to reopen.

The stay-at-home order expired May 15, and the governor issued an executive order with guidance for the next recovery phase.

Starting May 16, major league sports, including MLB, NBA, NHL and NFL, can resume without spectators.

Arkansas

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, bars, restaurant dine-in services, bars, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Movie theaters, concert and sporting venues.

On April 18, the governor announced an economic recovery task force and said he hoped to ease restrictions in the state beginning May 4. Barbershops, salons, spas and massage therapists are among the businesses that could reopen beginning May 6, with some restrictions. Restaurants could reopen for dine-in service at 33 percent capacity beginning May 11.

On May 18, indoor venues such as theaters, casinos, arenas, stadiums and auction houses could reopen on a limited basis. The capacity is limited to 50 people, and physical distancing must be maintained, along with other limitations.

On May 19, bars that are inside restaurants began reopening, while “free-standing” bars could open May 26, according to the governor.

On May 22, recreational pools reopened with additional guidelines.

On June 15, the state entered the second phase of its reopening plan, which increased the maximum capacity for bar and restaurant dine-in services and allowed large indoor and outdoor venues to increase their capacity.

There has been no statewide stay-in-place order.

California

  • Now open: Lower-risk businesses including bookstores, florists and clothing stores. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops in most of the state.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 4, the governor announced some “lower-risk workplaces with adaptations,” including bookstores, florists and clothing stores, would be allowed to reopen May 8, with some modifications such as curbside pickup.

On May 18, the governor said sports could return the “first week or so of June without spectators” but with “modifications and very prescriptive conditions.”

On May 26, the vast majority of the state’s 53 counties qualified to reopen barber shops and hair salons under a complex formula set out by health officials. But they will remain closed in six of the hardest-hit jurisdictions, including Los Angeles and San Francisco.

On June 12, approved counties were allowed to reopen gyms, hotels, restaurants, bars, wineries, family entertainment centers and other businesses with additional guidelines. Music, TV and film production resumed.

On June 18, the state health department announced that the state’s roughly 40 million residents must cover their faces in “most settings outside the home.” People in California must wear face coverings when they are working, “inside of, or in line to enter, any indoor public space” and when outdoors in public spaces where it’s hard to stay six feet away from people outside of their household, the department said.

On July 1, the governor ordered bars and indoor dining at restaurants to close in most areas of the state for the next three weeks amid a surge of new coronavirus cases throughout California. The revised stay-at-home order affects 19 counties where roughly 40 million people live — including Los Angeles County.

Colorado

  • Now open: Campgrounds at some state parks, gyms, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 20, the governor announced the state would shift from a stay-at-home order to a safer-at-home order. Some personal-care providers, such as medical and dental offices, were allowed to reopen April 27, as long as physical distancing is maintained. Retail stores began reopening May 1 and larger business offices May 4 at 50 percent capacity.

On May 12, campgrounds at some state parks were allowed to reopen.

On May 27, restaurants were allowed to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Summer camps were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

On June 4, indoor gyms, bowling alleys, pools and recreation centers were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity.

Connecticut

  • Now open: Restaurants for outdoor seating, movie theaters, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, offices, outdoor museums and zoos.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 30, the governor outlined a phased reopening plan beginning as soon as May 20. Under the plan, restaurants could reopen for outdoor seating, and nonessential retailers could reopen, along with hair and nail salons. Offices would be able to reopen, but workers would be encouraged to still work from home if possible. Outdoor zoos and museums could reopen, and outdoor recreation such as camping could resume.

On May 20, the state’s first phase of reopening allowed restaurants to offer outdoor seating, retail stores to let customers inside, outdoor museums and zoos to resume operations, and offices to allow employees to return. Hair salons and barber shops were also slated to start reopening May 20 until the governor pushed back the date to June 1.

On June 17, the state entered the second phase of its reopening plan, which allows more businesses to reopen with additional guidelines. Among those businesses are gyms, amusement parks, libraries, movie theaters, bowling alleys, restaurant dine-in services, and additional personal-care businesses such as nail salons and tattoo parlors.

Delaware

  • Now open: Gyms; retail businesses; personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons are by appointment only. Restaurants for dine-in services by reservation only. Beaches and community pools.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 5, the governor announced “interim steps” for small businesses to begin reopening May 8. Small-business retailers such as clothing stores, book and music stores, tobacco and vape stores, and sporting good stores may begin to offer curbside pickup. Jewelry stores may open by appointment only, and hair care services may be offered, but only to essential workers and with additional restrictions.

On May 22, beaches and community pools reopened, along with ice cream shops and trucks.

On June 1, the state entered phase one of its economic reopening. It allowed many businesses to reopen at 30 percent capacity, including personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons by appointment only, exercise facilities and malls. Restaurants could offer dine-in services by reservation only. Bars, sporting and entertainment venues remain closed.

On June 8, additional personal-care businesses such as tattoo shops and massage therapy services reopened at 30 percent capacity.

On June 15, the second phase of Delaware’s reopening plan began, which increased capacity limits for some businesses.

On June 25, the governor delayed Phase 3 of its economic reopening, which was scheduled for June 29.

District of Columbia

  • Now open: Restaurants for dining, personal-care businesses, such as salons and barbershops by appointment gyms, libraries, playgrounds.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, pools, theaters, concert and sporting venues.

On April 8, farmers markets and fish markets were required to close unless they received permission from the city government to reopen with new restrictions, and playing golf and tennis were also banned. Essential businesses such as grocery stores and banks must post signs outside instructing customers to wear a mask or face covering and stay six feet from one another. The order reversed the closure of apartment rooftops and courtyard spaces, provided that people visit these places only with family members and while keeping their distance from others. People can exercise outside, as long as they maintain six feet of physical distance.

On April 15, the mayor issued an order requiring people to wear masks or face coverings at hotels, during taxi and ride-share trips, and when selling food.

On May 13, the mayor extended the city’s stay-at-home order, mass gathering ban and closure of nonessential businesses through June 8, saying infections have not declined enough to start reopening the capital. Starting May 15, educational and academic retail shops, such as bookstores, could seek waivers to reopen for curbside and front-door pickup sales.

On May 29, the city entered phase one of reopening, which allows restaurants and taverns to resume outdoor dining, barber shops and salons can open by appointment with no waiting allowed and nonessential retailers can offer curbside sales. Parks, tennis courts, dog parks and fields may reopen, but public pools, recreational centers and playgrounds cannot, and contact sports remain banned. The stay-at-home order was lifted, but residents must still maintain six feet of distance from others and wear face coverings while in businesses. Gatherings of more than 10 people are still prohibited.

On June 22, the city entered the second phase of reopening, which will lift more restrictions. In Phase 2, indoor dining and retail can resume at 50 percent capacity. Camps reopened along with swimming pools, worship services without singing and gatherings of up to 50 people. Gyms, tanning salons and tattoo parlors also reopened as long as they keep plenty of space between their patrons.

Florida

  • Now open: Retail stores and restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Bars in most of the state. Gyms and outdoor recreation. Sporting venues may operate without spectators.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, concert venues.

On April 29, the governor outlined Florida’s recovery plan, which began May 4 with a measured approach. Visits to senior-living facilities are still prohibited. Retail stores and restaurants reopened at 25 percent of indoor capacity throughout the state except in Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties.

On May 1, the governor announced a limited reopening of recreational trails in state parks, including some beach access, with limitations.

On May 11, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen in most of the state with capacity limits. Sporting venues may operate without spectators.

On May 18, Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties were allowed to reopen personal-care businesses, retail stores and restaurants at 25 percent of indoor capacity. Gyms could reopen statewide at 50 percent capacity.

On June 5, most of the state moved into the second phase of reopening. Bars, theme parks, bowling alleys and other recreational venues with approved social distancing measures in place were allowed to open in 64 of Florida’s 67 counties. Florida’s three counties hit hardest by the virus — Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach — have yet to meet the state’s bar for reopening.

On June 26, due to a spike in new coronavirus cases, the state’s Department of Business and Professional Regulation announced it would close bars statewide.

On July 11, Disney theme parks are scheduled to begin reopening with additional guidelines.

Georgia

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, theaters and restaurant dine-in services. Bars and nightclubs.
  • Still closed: Live performance venues.

On April 20, the governor announced plans to ease restrictions and said some indoor facilities such as gyms and salons would be allowed to reopen April 24, as long as they comply with social distancing guidelines and other safety rules.

On April 27, restaurant dine-in services were allowed to resume, while theaters and private social clubs could reopen provided they meet specific guidelines.

On May 12, the governor issued an order that extended closures for certain businesses, such as bars and nightclubs, until May 31. The order allows child-care facilities to increase the number of people allowed in a single classroom from 10 to 20 with additional guidelines. Day camps can also resume if they meet specific guidelines.

On June 1, bars and nightclubs reopened with capacity limits and additional guidelines. Gatherings of more than 25 people are allowed if physical distancing is maintained.

On June 11, the governor announced people 65 and older are no longer required to stay home, unless they live in a nursing home or long-term care facility or have health issues that leave them vulnerable to the illness.

On June 16, gatherings of 50 people were allowed if they remain six feet apart. Restaurants no longer have to restrict the number of people who can sit together, and limits of the number of patrons per square feet were lifted. Bars were allowed to welcome 50 people — twice as many as before — or 35 percent of total listed capacity, whichever is greater.

On July 1, conventions and live performance venues can reopen with additional guidelines.

Hawaii

  • Now open: Retail businesses such as shopping malls, pet groomers and carwashes. Nonprofit organizations. Outdoor recreation.
  • Still closed: Restaurant dine-in services. Beaches can be used only for exercise.

On May 5, the governor announced the state would shift from a stay-at-home order to a safer-at-home order beginning May 7. Retail businesses such as shopping malls, pet groomers and carwashes, along with nonprofit organizations, can begin to reopen provided they meet specific guidelines.

On May 29, the governor approved several proposals to reopen additional businesses in Honolulu, Maui, Kauai and Hawaii counties.

Idaho

  • Now open: Restaurant dine-in services, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, places of worship, some retail stores. Bars and nightclubs, large venues such as movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues

On April 23, the governor announced a four-stage plan to reopen the state beginning May 1, as long as certain criteria are met. The first stage of the plan allows places of worship to reopen, provided physical distancing requirements are met. Many retail stores can also reopen.

On May 16, the state entered its second stage of reopening, allowing personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops to reopen, along with indoor gyms and restaurant dine-in services.

On May 30, the state entered its third stage of reopening, which will allow bars, breweries and wineries to reopen at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Indoor movie theaters, outdoor pools and water parks also reopened with additional guidelines.

On June 13, the state moved to Phase 4 of the governor’s plan, which allows the opening of large venues such as nightclubs and sporting arenas, as well as gatherings of up to 50 people, as long as social distancing is practiced. Additionally, all retailers were able to reopen, provided they adhere to the state’s safety guidelines.

Illinois

  • Now open: State parks, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, golf courses and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, large venues such as movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced an extension to the stay-at-home order, while allowing retail stores to open for pickup and delivery beginning May 1.

On May 29, the state began the third phase of its reopening plan, which allowed nonessential businesses, such as in-person retail businesses, to reopen. Personal care services, such as barbershops and salons, can reopen with additional guidance. Fitness clubs can offer outdoor classes and one-on-one personal training with additional guidance. Gatherings are limited to 10 people. Face coverings in public are required. Bars and restaurants are only open for pickup and delivery. Chicago began the third phase on June 3.

On June 26, the state entered the fourth phase of its reopening plan. Restaurants were allowed to offer dine-in services with limited capacity. Movie theaters and additional personal-care businesses could reopen with additional guidelines. Gatherings of 50 people or fewer were allowed.

Indiana

  • Now open: Retail stores, bars, nightclubs, gyms, movie theaters, offices, places of worship, restaurant dine-in service, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Conventions, fairs, festivals and parades.

On May 1, the governor announced a five-stage plan to reopen the state. Most of the state entered the second stage May 4, which allowed retail businesses to open at 50 percent capacity. On May 8, places of worship were able to reopen.

On May 11, restaurants and bars began operating at 50 percent capacity, but bar seating remained closed. Personal services such as hair salons and barbershops could reopen by appointment.

On May 22, most of the state entered “Stage 3” of its reopening plan. Retail businesses and malls increased to 75 percent capacity, and gyms and fitness centers reopened with additional guidelines. Movie theaters reopened at 50 percent capacity. Bars and nightclubs remained closed, along with entertainment and sports venues. The remaining three counties moved on to “Stage 3” on June 1.

On June 12, entered the fourth stage of its reopening plan. Bars and nightclubs were allowed to reopen at 50 percent capacity, restaurants were allowed to increased dine-in service capacity to 75 percent, and retail stores were allowed to operate at full capacity. Movie theaters and bowling alleys were allowed to reopen at 50 percent capacity. Amusement parks and waters parks were allowed to reopen at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines.

Iowa

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, bars, restaurant dine-in service, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On May 1, 77 of Iowa’s 99 counties that hadn’t had coronavirus cases or had seen a downward trend in infections over the previous two weeks began operating again with limited capacity.

On May 15, the remaining 22 counties were allowed to reopen gyms and restaurant dine-in services, and personal services such as hair salons and barbershops could reopen by appointment. Social gatherings of more than 10 people are still prohibited.

On May 22, movie theaters, museums and zoos were allowed to reopen.

On May 28, bars were allowed to reopen for indoor or outdoor seating at limited capacity and with additional guidelines.

On June 1, schools can reopen for school-sponsored activities.

On June 10, the governor issued a proclamation that eased restrictions on businesses, allowing many to operate without capacity limits provided physical distancing is maintained.

There has been no statewide stay-in-place order.

Kansas

  • Now open: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, movie theaters, bowling alleys, restaurant dine-in services and retail stores.

On April 30, the governor announced a multiphase plan to begin reopening the state May 4. Nonessential retail businesses and restaurants were allowed to reopen, provided physical distancing requirements are met.

On May 18, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops were allowed to open for appointments. Gyms may open, but in-person group classes may not occur.

On May 22, the state moved into the next of its reopening plan. Bowling alleys, movie theaters, state-owned casinos and other indoor leisure spaces were allowed to reopen. Bars, night clubs, swimming pools and large entertainment values will remain closed. People can gather in groups of up to 15 people.

On June 8, the state entered the third phase of its reopening plan, which allows people to gather in groups of up to 45 people. All businesses were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

On July 3, masks will be required in public spaces.

Kentucky

  • Now open: Non-urgent health-care services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, churches, manufacturing companies and pet grooming services. Gyms and movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced the state would begin its first phase of reopening April 27, allowing non-urgent health-care services to resume.

On April 29, the governor announced the state’s tentative plan to begin reopening businesses. Manufacturing companies could resume work and horse-racing events could start again without fans beginning May 11.

On May 20, churches could open for services. Retail stores reopened at limited capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 22, restaurants opened for dine-in services with limited capacity and outdoor seating.

On May 25, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened with additional guidelines.

On June 1, movie theaters, gyms and fitness centers were allowed to reopen.

On June 22, many businesses increased capacity from 33 percent to 50 percent if they met certain guidelines.

On June 29, bars and venues that hold 50 or fewer people reopened if they met additional guidelines. Public swimming pools also reopened with additional guidelines.

Louisiana

  • Now open in most of the state: Places of worship, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, theaters, gyms and restaurant dine-in services. Retails stores. State parks, including overnight facilities for residents.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, with several tweaks, including that restaurant patrons were now being allowed to eat their takeout food in outdoor seating areas as long as no employees serve them beginning May 1. Stores could also offer curbside pickup.

On May 15, the stay-at-home order was lifted and many nonessential businesses were allowed to reopen with occupancy limits, including places of worship, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, gyms, theaters and restaurants. State parks, including overnight facilities, could reopen for residents. The governor referred to this as the first phase of reopening.

On June 5, most of the state — with the exception of New Orleans — entered Phase 2 of its reopening plan, which will last at least 21 days. Gyms, restaurants, movie theaters, museums, bowling alleys, shopping malls and event centers are among the businesses that reopened at 50 percent capacity. Bars and breweries that do not have food permits reopened at 25 percent capacity. Amusement parks, carnivals, contact sports, concert and music halls are among the businesses that remain closed.

Maine

  • Now open in most of the state: Outdoor recreation, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Bars and tasting rooms for outdoor service. Retail stores and restaurant dine-in services in rural areas. Gyms and exercise facilities.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor outlined a plan for a “phased-in” reopening of the state’s economy.

On April 28, the governor announced a new stay-safe-at-home order, which will continue to have people stay home through May 31. The order, which began May 1, allows residents to visit businesses deemed safe to open under Stage 1 of the state’s reopening plan, which includes barbershops, hair salons and pet grooming locations.

On May 8, the governor announced that rural retail stores could reopen beginning May 11. Gyms and fitness centers began resuming outdoor classes May 11.

On May 18, restaurant dine-in services in rural areas began resuming with additional guidelines.

On June 1, gyms, fitness centers and nail salons were scheduled to open, but the governor delayed the reopening. The reopening of restaurant dine-in services in several counties was delayed as well.

On June 12, 13 of the state’s 16 counties were allowed to reopen bars and tasting rooms for outdoor service only as part of the state’s rural reopening plan. Gyms and exercise facilities were also allowed to reopen in these counties.

On June 17, the three remaining counties were allowed to reopen bars and tasting rooms for outdoor service and with additional guidelines. Gyms and exercise facilities were also allowed to reopen.

On June 22, the governor postponed reopening indoor bar services.

Maryland

  • Now open in most of the state: Outdoor recreation, gyms, casinos, restaurant dine-in services, places of worship, retail stores, and personal-care businesses, such as salons and barbershops, by appointment only.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 15, the governor ordered residents to wear masks when they go out to stores.

On April 24, the governor announced a three-tiered plan to reopen but said it would begin only when data shows that the virus’s spread is under control and the health system is prepared for any spike in infections.

On May 6, the governor announced the state would slowly begin to ease the stay-at-home order, granting permission for certain outdoor activities and allowing doctors to schedule some elective surgeries, including dental work. State parks and beaches reopened May 7 for boating, camping, fishing and tennis.

On May 13, the governor announced he would lift the stay-at-home order that has shuttered most businesses and churches. Beginning May 15, some small shops and all religious organizations were allowed to operate at 50 percent capacity provided proper social distancing restrictions are followed — and local governments also say it is safe. Several jurisdictions, including Montgomery and Prince George’s counties, plan to keep restrictions in place.

On June 1, Prince George’s and Montgomery, the two most populous counties in Maryland, began relaxing restrictions. Restaurants may offer outdoor dining only, at half-capacity. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops could reopen by appointment only.

On June 5, most of the state entered the second stage of its reopening plan. More nonessential businesses, ranging from auto dealerships to nail and tanning salons, will be allowed to reopen with limited capacity. But many restrictions, including a ban on indoor restaurant dining, will remain in place. Montgomery and Prince George’s officials said that they would also delay entering the second phase of reopening.

On June 12, restrictions on indoor dining and outdoor amusement activities were lifted in most of the state.

Prince George’s County moved to the second phase of reopening on June 15. Neighboring Montgomery County moved to the next stage of reopening on June 19 at 5 p.m.

On June 19 at 5 p.m., other businesses and buildings reopened in most of the state, including day cares, gyms, dance and martial arts facilities. Restaurants were able to offer indoor dining with 50 percent capacity. Casinos, arcades and malls can resume operations. Schools can hold outdoor graduation ceremonies with physical distancing measures. The changes don’t affect the Washington suburbs, which have opted to reopen more slowly.

Massachusetts

  • Now open: Places of worship, outdoor recreation, construction and manufacturing industries. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores. Restaurants for indoor and outdoor dining.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues

The governor has extended through May 18 his original order, which prohibits gatherings of more than 10 people. People can go out for groceries, medicine and other essentials. Outdoor exercise is allowed as long as people maintain six-foot physical distancing.

On May 11, the governor announced a four-phase plan to reopen the state beginning as soon as May 18, when “limited industries resume operations with severe restrictions.” The second phase would permit additional businesses to operate with limited capacity and certain conditions.

On May 18, the governor outlined the first phase of the state’s reopening plan. The stay-at-home advisory became a safer-at-home advisory. Construction and manufacturing industries were allowed to resume operations, and places of worship could reopen. Facial masks are required in public spaces when six feet of physical distance cannot be maintained.

On May 25, other parts of the state were allowed to reopen with capacity limits and additional guidelines, including beaches, drive-in movie theaters and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores were allowed to offer curbside pickup. Offices can open in most of the state, excluding Boston, which can reopen offices June 1.

On June 8, the state entered the second phase of its reopening plan. Retail stores were allowed to reopen at 40 percent capacity and restaurants began offering outdoor dining.

On June 22, the state lifted additional restrictions as part of its Phase 2 reopening plan. Indoor table services, close-contact personal services and retail dressing rooms reopened with restrictions. Offices also reopened at 50 percent capacity.

Michigan

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation and construction businesses. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Retail stores. Restaurants for dine-in services. Bars.
  • Still closed: Gyms, nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 9, the governor implemented additional restrictions for stores, specifying limits on the number of customers allowed in a store at one time based on floor space.

On April 27, the governor introduced a plan to start reopening the state’s businesses, which she said would be done at an “incremental” pace. Construction businesses were allowed to resume operations May 7.

On May 1, the governor signed a new executive order that extended various business closures and the emergency declaration until May 28.

On May 22, businesses and restaurants in northern Michigan reopened at reduced capacity under a new executive order the governor issued May 18. It allows bars and restaurants to operate at 50 percent capacity, with face coverings required for servers and six feet of distance between customers, as well as social gatherings of up to 10 people. The governor said the existing stay-at-home order affecting the rest of the state will remain in effect until May 28 unless decreases in the rate of new cases and deaths and increased testing indicates it is safe to revise them earlier.

On May 26, retail stores and auto showrooms reopened by appointment only and with a limit of 10 customers at a time.

On May 29, elective surgeries were allowed to resume.

On June 1, the governor lifted the state’s stay-at-home order and moved the state to Phase 4 of its reopening plan. Up to 100 people are allowed to gather outdoors, though with distancing. Restrictions on indoor gatherings remain in place, with no more than 10 people permitted. Face masks are still required in enclosed public spaces.

On June 4, retailers were permitted to reopen with capacity limits.

On June 8, restaurants and bars were able to serve customers on-site with capacity limits. Public swimming pools and day camps were allowed to reopen.

On June 10, northern Michigan entered the fifth phase of the reopening plan, which allows salons, movie theaters and gyms to reopen with reduced capacity.

On June 15, personal-care businesses such as hair and nail salons were allowed to reopen statewide.

Minnesota

  • Now open: Offices, gyms, outdoor recreation, theaters, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Bars and restaurants for dine-in service.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor issued an order that allowed workers in industrial and office settings — specifically those who cannot work from home — to begin returning to work April 27, subject to several conditions.

On April 30, the governor announced an extension of Minnesota’s stay-at-home orders until May 18, while loosening some restrictions so some retailers could reopen in a limited capacity. Retailers could reopen for curbside pickup and delivery beginning May 4.

On May 18, retail stores and malls were allowed to reopen. People could gather in groups of up to 10. Restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops remained closed.

On June 1, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened at 25 percent capacity. Bars and restaurants were allowed to offer outdoor dining with additional guidelines. The Mall of America postponed its scheduled reopening on June 1.

On June 10, the state entered the third phase of its reopening plan. Restaurants and bars were allowed to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Gyms, bowling alleys and indoor entertainment venues such as theaters and concert halls reopened at 25 percent capacity. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops can increase their capacity to 50 percent. Public swimming pools can operate at 50 percent capacity.

Mississippi

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, and restaurant dine-in services. Amusement parks. Bars, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 24, the governor signed a safer-at-home order, lasting from April 27 to May 11, to begin reopening the economy. Under the order, retail stores could reopen as long as they limit customers to less than 50 percent of the store’s capacity.

A May 4 order allowed restaurants to allow dine-in services at 50 percent capacity beginning May 7, provided they meet additional guidelines.

On May 8, the governor extended the safer-at-home order to May 25, while allowing gyms, barbershops and salons to reopen with additional restrictions.

On May 21, casinos were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

On May 25, amusement parks and other outdoor places of recreation were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines and at 50 percent of the maximum occupancy.

On June 1, the stay-at-home order ended. All businesses were allowed to reopen, including bars and movie theaters, capacity limits and additional guidelines.

On July 1, the governor said the state would pause its reopening plans after initially planning to fully reopen the state on that date.

Missouri

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the first phase of the state’s “Show Me Strong Recovery” plan, which began reopening the state’s economy May 4. Retail stores were able to reopen, but must limit the number of customers based on the building’s square footage. Restaurants were able to reopen their dining rooms, along with other businesses such as barbershops, as long as physical distancing requirements are met. Places of worships are open. Gyms are also open. There are no limitations on social gatherings as long as physical distancing requirements are met.

On June 16, the state fully reopened and lifted all statewide restrictions, but local officials still have the authority to enact further regulations.

Montana

  • Now open: Schools, outdoor recreation, places of worship, restaurant dine-in services, bars, retail stores, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Entertainment venues.

In an April 22 order, the governor announced a plan to begin a phased reopening of the state, with the stay-at-home order expiring April 26 for people and April 27 for businesses, including retail stores as long as they maintain physical distance and adhere to requirements to limit capacity. Personal-care services such as salons and barbershops were allowed reopen. Places of worship can also reopen. Restaurants and bars began providing some in-establishment services May 4.

On May 7, schools were allowed to reopen at the discretion of local school boards.

On May 15, movie theaters, gyms and museums were allowed to reopen.

On June 1, the state entered Phase 2 of its reopening plan. Restaurants and bars were allowed to increase their dine-in capacity to 75 percent. Social gatherings are limited to 50 people. Concert halls, bowling alleys and other entertainment venues can operate at reduced capacity.

Nebraska

  • Now open in most of the state: Bars, gyms, places of worship, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs and movie theaters.

On April 24, the governor announced restrictions on social gatherings and business operations would be eased. Some businesses, including restaurants, salons and barbershops, were allowed to reopen May 4 in certain districts, but must limit seating to 50 percent of maximum occupancy. Places of worship also were able to reopen but must adhere to additional guidelines. Bars and movie theaters are among the businesses that must remain closed until at least May 31.

On June 1, bars reopened with capacity restrictions in most of the state. Some limited-contact and noncontact team sports resumed practicing. Gatherings are limited to 25 people.

On June 22, 89 of state’s 93 counties entered the third phase of reopening, while the remaining four counties entered the second phase. In the third phase, bars and restaurants can operate at full capacity. Gyms, salons and barbershops will be allowed to operate at 75 percent capacity. Indoor gatherings will be limited to 50 percent capacity, while outdoor gatherings will be limited to 75 percent capacity, and neither can exceed 10,000 people.

No statewide order has been in place.

Nevada

  • Now open: Gyms, bars, movie theaters, outdoor recreation sites, retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues with spectators.

In an April 29 order, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 15, while easing some restrictions beginning May 1. All retail businesses can now operate with curbside pickup, including marijuana dispensaries. Restrictions on outdoor activities, including golf and tennis, were also relaxed.

On May 7, the governor announced Nevada would enter the first reopening phase May 9, allowing certain nonessential businesses to reopen, including retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops to operate at reduced capacity.

On May 29, the stated entered its second reopening phase, which allows gyms, bars and indoor entertainment venues, such as movie theaters and malls, to reopen at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On June 4, Las Vegas casinos and resorts began reopening. At all casinos, occupancy limits in gaming areas were cut in half, and group gatherings will be prohibited.

On June 24, the governor announced that all Nevada residents and visitors must wear face coverings in public spaces.

On June 29, the governor extended the second reopening phase until the end of July.

New Hampshire

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Hotels and short-term rentals. Restaurants for dine-in service and bars. Movie theaters and concert and sporting venues.

On April 21, the governor announced a task force that will develop a plan to reopen the economy in several phases.

On May 1, the governor announced a modified stay-at-home order in effect until May 31. Under the new order, certain businesses such as golf courses, retail stores and salons began reopening May 11, with certain occupancy and physical distancing restrictions.

On May 18, restaurants could open outdoor seating areas with additional restrictions.

On June 1, additional personal-care businesses such as tanning and nail salons reopened with guidelines. Fitness centers were allowed to reopen for small classes and with additional guidelines.

On June 5, hotels and short-term rentals resumed service for in-state residents and from out-of-state residents who have quarantined for 14 days.

On June 15, stay-at-home orders expired and groups of 10 or more were allowed to gather. Gyms and libraries reopened, with modifications. Restaurants in six of the state’s 10 counties were allowed to reopen at full capacity, while the restaurants in the remaining counties can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Wedding receptions were allowed to resume at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines.

On June 29, movie theaters, performing art centers and amusement parks reopened with additional guidelines.

New Jersey

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, construction, retail stores and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Beaches, boardwalks and lakeshores. Elective surgeries. Restaurants for outdoor dining.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the state would not begin reopening its economy until officials detect a 14-day trend of “appreciable and sustained” drops in new coronavirus cases and hospitalizations.

On April 29, the governor issued an order to reopen state parks and golf courses beginning May 2.

On May 18, nonessential retail businesses were allowed to reopen for curbside pickup. Nonessential construction resumed.

On May 22, beaches, boardwalks, lakes and lakeshores reopened with physical distancing measures.

On May 26, elective surgeries resumed.

On June 15, the state entered the second stage of its reopening plan. Restaurants will be allowed to reopen for outdoor dining and retail stores will be allowed to offer limited in-person shopping.

On June 22, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened with additional guidelines. Public and private pools also reopened. The limit on outdoor gatherings is scheduled to increase to 250 people.

On June 29, the governor announced the state would not reopen indoor dining July 2.

New Mexico

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, breweries, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, pet services and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 6, the governor extended the emergency order, adding further restrictions, including limiting maximum occupancy in retail stores that qualify as essential businesses, such as grocery stores. These stores cannot exceed 20 percent of the occupancy limit as determined by the fire marshal.

On April 30, the governor modified the order to allow nonessential retailers to offer curbside pickup, beginning May 1. State parks and golf courses were allowed to reopen and pet services were permitted to operate. Nine additional state parks were allowed to reopen for daytime-use only on May 15.

On May 16, retailers were allowed to operate at 25 percent capacity. Entertainment venues remained closed. The governor announced that locations and services where close contact is unavoidable — such as gyms, salons, and dine-in service at restaurants and bars — will remain temporarily closed. Masks are required of everyone in public places, with exceptions for eating, drinking, exercising and medical requirements.

On June 1, gyms and restaurants were allowed to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity. Bars remain closed.

On June 15, breweries were allowed to reopen for indoor service at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines. Bars remain closed.

On June 25, the governor announced a delay to Phase 2 reopening activities statewide.

New York

  • Now open in some parts: Outdoor recreational activities, state beaches, elective surgeries, drive-in movie theaters and curbside pickup for retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

The governor extended a stay-at-home order on April 6 and increased the maximum fine for violating the state’s physical distancing policy from $500 to $1,000.

On April 27, the governor said some parts of the state would “unpause” May 15 as the first phase of a reopening plan.

On May 11, the governor announced that “certain low-risk businesses and recreational activities” could resume May 15, including landscaping, outdoor recreational activities and drive-in movie theaters. Additionally, each region in the state will have to meet seven metrics to start the four-phase reopening. In the first phase of reopening, construction, the manufacturing and wholesale supply chain, agriculture, forestry and fishing can resume operations. Retail stores can begin offering curbside pickup.

On May 13, elective surgeries resumed in most of the state.

On May 18, the governor said the state is “willing to partner with major sports teams that are interested in playing games safely, without fans.”

On May 22, state beaches reopened with limited capacity and additional guidelines.

On May 28, the governor signed an executive order authorizing businesses to deny entry to those who are not wearing face masks.

On May 29, the governor said five regions entered the second phase of reopening, which allows nonessential retail businesses and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines.

On June 1, dentists resumed normal operations. The offices are subject to health and safety guidelines, such as social distancing, use of masks and taking customers’ temperature.

On June 8, New York City began the first phase of reopening. Stores previously deemed nonessential were cleared to reopen for delivery and curbside pickup, though customers cannot yet browse inside. Construction, manufacturing and wholesalers also were cleared to resume work.

On June 22, New York City started the second phase of reopening, whichallows restaurants and bars to open for outdoor service with additional guidelines. Several businesses, from offices to indoor retail to hair salons and barbershops, reopened with conditions. Malls, indoor dining service, large event venues, gyms, casinos and movie theaters, among other businesses, are still be under shutdown orders.

As of June 17, seven of the state’s 10 regions entered the third phase of reopening. In Phase Three, gatherings of up to 25 people are allowed, restaurants can resume dine-in services at 50 percent capacity and additional personal-care businesses such as tattoo facilities and nail salons reopened with additional guidelines.

As of June 26, graduation ceremonies with up to 150 people are allowed.

On July 1, the governor said indoor dining at New York City restaurants will be delayed, while outdoor dining can continue.

On July 2, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio said schools will reopen in the fall with social distancing measures.

North Carolina

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, retail stores, restaurant dine-in services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Gyms, bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 5, the governor issued an order that modified the state’s stay-at-home order to begin easing restrictions May 8. Most retail businesses can reopen at 50 percent capacity. People are allowed to leave home for nonessential services. State parks and trails are encouraged to reopen. Bars, personal-care businesses, entertainment venues and gyms are among the businesses that remain closed. The order is in effect until May 22.

On May 22, the state entered Phase 2, which allows restaurants to open dine-in services and personal care businesses such as salons and barbershops at 50 percent capacity. Gatherings are limited to 10 people indoors and 25 people outdoors. Gyms, bars, nightclubs and indoor entertainment such as movie theaters will remain closed. The phase will last until at least June 26.

On June 24, the governor said North Carolina would pause reopening activity for three weeks and require residents to wear face coverings in public spaces.

On July 2, the governor vetoed three bills that would have reopened gyms, fitness centers and amusement parks more quickly than he had planned. The legislature was also aiming to reopen skating rinks, bowling alleys and other entertainment venues, the Raleigh News and Observer reported.

North Dakota

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, gyms, restaurant dine-in services, bars and nightclubs, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, and movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Concert and sporting venues.

On April 29, the governor issued an order that suggested that many of the closed businesses — including bars, restaurants and salons — could reopen beginning May 1. Movie theaters can reopen at 20 percent capacity. Gyms can reopen with additional restrictions. Campgrounds and marinas began reopening May 9.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Ohio

  • Now open: Gyms, pools, casinos, amusement parks, offices, entertainment spaces, retail stores, construction sites, manufacturing and distribution companies. Restaurants and bar dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced the state would reopen some health-care services May 1, and general offices, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies May 4. Retailers were allowed to reopen May 12.

On May 15, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops could reopen with additional guidelines. Restaurants and bars began offering outdoor dining dine-in services with additional guidelines.

On May 21, bars and restaurants began offering dine-in services.

On May 26, pools reopened with additional guidelines, including physical distance requirements. Face coverings are recommended when entering the facilities. Gyms and fitness centers also reopened. Some adult and youth sports leagues were allowed to resume.

On June 1, catering and banquet centers reopened with a capacity limit of 300 people and with similar guidelines for restaurants.

On June 10, entertainment spaces reopened with additional guidelines. Aquariums, art galleries, country clubs, ice skating rinks, indoor family entertainment centers, indoor sports facilities, laser tag facilities, movie theaters, museums, playgrounds, public recreation centers, roller skating rinks, social clubs, trampoline parks and zoos are permitted to open.

On June 19, casinos, amusement parks and water parks were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines.

Oklahoma

  • Now open: Places of worship, gyms, bars, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 22, the governor announced a three-stage plan to begin reopening the state starting April 24, when retail stores and personal-care businesses such as barbershops and salons were allowed to reopen. State parks and outdoor recreation also were reopened. Restaurants, movie theaters, gyms, sporting venues and places of worship began reopening May 1 provided they adhere to physical distancing protocols. Bars remain closed.

On May 15, the governor announced the state would enter its second phase, which allowed bars to reopen, along with organized sports. Weddings and funerals are also allowed. Specific social distancing and sanitation guidelines remain in effect.

On June 1, the state entered the third phase of its reopening plan. Summer camps reopened, and businesses operating by appointment only could begin offering walk-in service.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Oregon

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, some retail stores, gyms, bars and restaurants for dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops in approved counties.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 23, the governor announced she would lift the order delaying non-urgent medical procedures beginning May 1, as long as health-care providers meet specific guidelines.

On May 5, the governor announced some state parks and outdoor recreation sites could begin to reopen May 6.

On May 7, the governor announced some counties could begin reopening May 15 if they meet all prerequisites as part of the first phase of Oregon’s reopening. As of May 8, the Oregonian reported that 32 of the state’s 36 counties had applied to reopen. The approved counties will be able to open restaurant dine-in services and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops with additional restrictions.

On May 15, some retailers, such as art galleries, jewelry shops and furniture stores, could reopen statewide. Approved counties can begin opening bars and restaurants for dine-in services, gyms, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops with additional restrictions.

On June 4, the governor announced that 26 counties have been approved to move forward to Phase 2 on June 5, 6 and 8. Phase 2 increases the number of people permitted to gather together in addition to allowing bars and restaurants to stay open to midnight. Movie theaters, swimming pools and bowling alleys can now do business under outlined safety guidelines.

On June 11, the governor announced a one-week “pause” of reopening plans, calling for “a statewide yellow light.” The plan halts new applications for reopening in the Portland area, which had been expected to enter the first phase. The governor said Oregon has seen rising case counts in some cities, as well as rural areas.

Pennsylvania

  • Now open in certain regions: Restaurants and bars at limited capacity. personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershop. Outdoor recreation and retail stores.
  • Still closed: Gyms, nightclubs and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced certain businesses related to outdoor activities, such as golf courses, marinas and campgrounds, would reopen May 1.

On May 1, the governor announced the reopening of 24 counties beginning May 8, as part of his phased, color-coded plan. The reopened counties will move to the yellow phase, which means large gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited. Gyms, spas, hair salons, nail salons, casinos and theaters remain closed. Restaurants and bars are still limited to pickup and delivery. In-person retail is allowed in those counties.

On May 15, 13 more counties moved from the red to the yellow reopening phase.

On May 29, 17 counties moved from the yellow to the green reopening phase and eight counties moved from red to yellow. In the green phase, restaurants and bars can reopen at 50 percent capacity. Personal care services can reopen at 50 percent capacity, along with all entertainment, including casinos and theaters. Philadelphia is one of the eight counties still in the red phase.

On June 5, the remaining counties moved to the yellow reopening phase.

On June 12, 12 more counties moved to the green reopening phase, giving the state 46 counties at that level and 21 in the yellow phase.

On June 19, eight more counties moved to the green phase.

On July 1, K-12 schools in the state’s “yellow and green phases” of reopening can resume in-person classes, provided they meet certain health safety conditions, according to the Pennsylvania Department of Education.

On July 1, masks were required for anyone who leaves their home.

Puerto Rico

  • Now open: Construction and manufacturing companies. Restaurant dine-in services, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Beaches, movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 30, the governor announced certain parts of the economy could start to reopen. Smaller businesses, such as mortgage brokers, accountants and real estate agents, began reopening May 4. Construction and manufacturing companies began operating May 11. Beaches, parks and recreation centers will remain closed.

On May 26, beaches, restaurants, churches, hair salons and retail stores reopened with additional guidelines. Restaurants were allowed to operate at 25 percent capacity. Hair salons and barber shops could reopen by appointment only. The 7 p.m.-to-5 a.m. curfew will remain in place until June 15 and all people will be required to wear a mask when outside or inside a business. Gyms and movie theaters remain closed.

On June 8, malls reopened.

On June 15, the territory lifted nearly all of its coronavirus restrictions, allowing beaches, churches, gyms and movie theaters to reopen. Businesses were permitted to operate seven days a week and restaurants can be filled to 50 percent capacity.

Rhode Island

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops, outdoor recreation, retail stores and offices, bars, movie theaters
  • Bars with seated service onlin.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On May 4, the governor detailed a multiphase plan for reopening the state May 9. In the first phase, the stay-at-home order would be lifted, some parks would reopen, elective medical procedures would be allowed, and some noncritical retailers could reopen with enhanced safety measures.

On May 11, the governor announced restaurants could begin offering outdoor dining May 18.

On May 25, two state beaches reopened at limited capacity. Bathrooms and concessions remain closed, and there is reduced parking.

On June 1, the state entered its second phase of reopening, which allows restaurants to offer dine-in services at 50 percent capacity, personal-care services such as salons and barbershops to reopen with additional restrictions and gyms to reopen on a limited basis.

On June 29, summer camps and youth summer programs reopened with additional guidelines.

On June 30, the state moved into Phase 3 of reopening, with new limits on private (25 people indoors, 50 outdoors) and public gatherings (125 indoors, 250 outdoors), as well as allowing bars to reopen for seated service only and indoor and outdoor recreational and entertainment establishments, such as movie theaters, to resume.

South Carolina

  • Now open: Gyms, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores and outdoor recreation, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Many attractions, including zoos and amusement park rides.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 20, the governor announced many retail outlets would be allowed to reopen, while local jurisdictions would determine public access to beaches.

On May 1, the governor announced the statewide “work-or-home” order would be lifted beginning May 4, allowing restaurants to begin offering outdoor seating with some additional requirements.

On May 11, restaurants were allowed to begin offering dine-services at 50 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 18, gyms and fitness centers could reopen and offer group classes. Public and commercial pools can reopen with additional guidelines. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops can reopen with additional guidelines.

On May 22, many attractions, including zoos, museums, aquariums, planetariums, water parks and amusement park rides, reopened with additional physical distancing guidelines.

On June 15, youth and adult sports leagues were allowed to resume competitive play.

South Dakota

On April 28, the governor announced a “Back to Normal” plan, which gives some general guidance to businesses. There have been no statewide restrictions throughout the crisis, although some cities ordered closures.

Tennessee

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, bars, gyms, retail stores, restaurants dine-in services, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops. Large entertainment venues.

On April 20, the governor announced that stay-at-home orders would end April 30 and that some businesses, particularly in less-populated areas, could reopen April 27. Restaurants were allowed to reopen in 89 of the state’s 95 counties at 50 percent capacity beginning April 27. Gyms could also reopen at 50 percent capacity beginning May 1.

On April 29, the governor announced barber and beauty shops, as well as nail salons, could reopen May 6.

On May 22, capacity restrictions were lifted for restaurants and retail stores in most counties. Bars were allowed to reopen for customers at seated tables and with additional guidelines. Large entertainment venues, such as amusement parks and concert venues, were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines and capacity limits.

Texas

  • Now open: Gyms, in-person summer school classes, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters, restaurant dine-in services.
  • Closed: Bars

On April 17, the governor issued three orders centered on reopening the state. One allows retail outlets to reopen April 24, but items must be delivered to customers’ cars, homes or other locations to minimize contact.

On April 27, the governor said he would let his stay-at-home order expire and allow all retailers, movie theaters, museums, libraries and some health-care businesses to reopen at 25 percent capacity as part of the first phase of the state’s reopening starting May 1.

On May 6, the governor issued an order to allow gyms and exercise facilities to reopen at 25 percent capacity beginning May 18. Salons, barbershops and other personal-care businesses could reopen May 8, provided they meet additional physical distancing guidelines. Restaurants are allowed to offer dine-in services at 25 percent capacity.

On May 18, gyms and office buildings were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On May 22, the state entered its second phase of reopening. Bars, bowling alleys, bingo halls and rodeo events were allowed to open with additional guidelines, including occupancy limits.

On May 29, zoos and water parks were allowed to reopen at 25 percent capacity.

On May 31, certain professional sports leagues were allowed to reopen without fans. Recreational sports leagues were allowed to resume.

On June 1, in-person summer school classes were able to resume with additional guidelines.

On June 3, the state entered its third phase, which allows businesses operating at 25 percent capacity to move to 50 percent, with certain protocols still in place. Bars can move to 50 percent capacity, as long as people are seated, and restaurants can now sit 10 people to a table. The third phase also allows amusement parks and carnivals in counties with fewer than 1,000 confirmed cases of the virus to reopen at 50 percent capacity.

On June 12, restaurants increased to 75 percent capacity,

On June 19, amusement parks and carnivals in counties with more than 1,000 confirmed cases were allowed to open at 50 percent capacity.

On June 25, the governor said Texas would pause reopening activities to address a recent spikes in coronavirus cases.

On June 26, the governor shut down bars again and scaled back restaurant dining. He also ordered rafting and tubing outfitters on Texas’s popular rivers to close and required outdoor gatherings of 100 people or more to first seek approval from local governments.

On July 2, the governor issued a statewide mandate requiring Texans to wear masks in public in any county with 20 or more positive covid-19 cases. The executive order also grants local officials the power to restrict gatherings of more than 10 people “with certain exceptions.”

U.S. Virgin Islands

  • Now open: Bars, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, private businesses, gyms, theaters, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, and public beaches.

On April 30, the governor issued a safer-at-home order to begin reopening the economy.

Starting May 4, private business offices were allowed to reopen, along with retail stores, gyms, bowling alleys, theaters, personal-care businesses and grooming services — with additional restrictions. People are required to wear a face mask when entering a business. Bars and nightclubs remain closed, and restaurants can offer only takeout, delivery or drive-through service.

On June 1, the territory entered the “Open Doors” phase of its reopening plan, which allows all businesses to reopen.

Utah

  • Now open: Places of worship, bars, gyms, personal-care businesses, such as salons and barbershops, retail stores, bars, and restaurant dine-in services.

On April 29, the governor issued an order to begin reopening the state May 1. Gyms, salons and other personal-care businesses are among the establishments that can reopen, provided they meet specific guidelines. Restaurants can again offer dine-in options.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.

Vermont

  • Now open: Restaurants and bars for dine-in service, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retail businesses, outdoor recreation locations, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, concert and sporting venues.

On April 17, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen the state, with certain businesses able to reopen April 20.

On April 24, the governor outlined additional openings, including outdoor businesses, construction operations and recreation maintenance work, with a maximum of five workers per location, beginning April 27. Outdoor retail space could allow in-person shopping beginning April 27, with a maximum of 10 people.

On May 18, in-person retail businesses were allowed to reopen with additional guidelines, including occupancy limits.

On May 22, lodging operations including hotels, motels, short-term rentals and camping facilities reopened with additional guidelines. Restaurants and bars reopened for outdoor seating with additional guidelines.

On May 29, zoos reopened. Personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops reopened by appointment and with occupancy limits.

On May 31, overnight camps, youth sports and certain professional sports without fans reopened.

On June 1, gyms and fitness centers were allowed to reopen.

On June 5, restaurants and bars were allowed to reopen for dine-in service at 25 percent capacity and with additional guidelines.

On June 26, event venues and restaurants can increase occupancy to 50 percent. Indoor events can resume with up to 75 people, while outdoor events can have up to 150 people.

Virginia

  • Now open in most of the state: Restaurant dine-in services, gyms, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, retailers, outdoor recreation facilities, construction sites, and manufacturing and distribution companies.
  • Still closed: Indoor bar areas, nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 15, the governor extended his shutdown order for nonessential businesses — initially set to expire April 23 — until May 8.

On April 24, the governor released a blueprint for eventually easing public-health restrictions. He said Virginia will follow federal guidelines for deciding when to ease restrictions: The percentage of positive coronavirus tests and the number of hospitalizations must decline for 14 consecutive days, and the state must have ample hospital capacity and an “increasing and sustainable supply” of personal protective equipment.

On May 12, the governor announced that he signed an executive order allowing Northern Virginia to remain shut down as the rest of the state eased restrictions. He moved most of the state into phase one of his reopening plan starting on May 15, while allowing jurisdictions in the Washington suburbs to delay a gradual reopening until May 28. In phase one, nonessential retail can open at 50 percent capacity, restaurants are allowed to offer outdoor seating, and personal-care businesses could offer appointments. Gyms and fitness centers remain closed, along with entertainment venues.

On June 5, most of the state moved to the second phase of reopening. Restaurants were allowed indoor dining at half capacity and gyms and fitness centers opened at 30 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Northern Virginia and the city of Richmond will remain in phase one. In most of the state, the limit on groups expanded to 50 or fewer people, which allows some entertainment venues to reopen, while pools, museums and zoos reopened with restrictions. Recreational sports were allowed with proper distancing and no sharing of equipment.

On June 12, Northern Virginia and Richmond moved to the second phase of shutdown recovery. The looser restrictions include opening restaurants for indoor dining at half capacity and allowing gyms and fitness centers to reopen indoors at 30 percent capacity. The governor said Virginia students will return to school in the fall if the state continues to limit the spread of the virus.

On July 1, Virginia moved into its third reopening phase, allowing child-care centers to resume and increasing the cap on large social gatherings to 250 people. Restaurants and nonessential retail businesses can operate at full capacity. Meanwhile, pools, indoor gyms and fitness centers can operate at 75 percent capacity. Entertainment venues, such as museums and zoos, can open at 50 percent capacity, with a cap of 1,000 people at outdoor venues.

Washington

  • Now open: Outdoor recreation, restaurant dine-in services in some counties, retail stores for curbside delivery, gyms and personal-care services such as salons and barbershops.
  • Still closed: Bars and nightclubs, movie theaters, concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced a partial reopening of some outdoor recreational activities on May 5, including golf, hunting and fishing.

On May 1, the governor extended the stay-at-home order to May 31 and announced a four-phase plan to reopen the state.

On May 11, eight counties, many of them in rural eastern Washington, entered phase two. Restaurants in those communities that want to reopen will have to meet guidelines laid out by the governor’s office, which include keeping their dining rooms at half capacity and ensuring that buffets and salad bars remain closed.

On June 3, six counties applied for the third phase of a four-stage reopening plan, according to the Associated Press. Columbia, Ferry, Lincoln, Pend Oreille, Stevens and Wahkiakum counties have been in Phase 2 for three weeks and are now eligible to apply to move forward. The third phase allows for gatherings of 50 people or less, restaurants to open to 75 percent capacity and gyms and movies to open at 50 percent capacity.

On June 24, the state required face coverings for public indoor and outdoor spaces.

On June 27, the governor announced that the state paused the fourth phase of reopening for eight counties, citing recent spikes in new cases statewide. The phase restarts all recreational activity, increases gatherings to more than 50 people and reopens nightclubs, concert venues and large sporting events.

West Virginia

  • Now open: Outdoor fishing. Gyms and fitness centers. Casinos. Malls. Bars. Restaurants can offer indoor dining. Pet groomers, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops by appointment. Museums and zoos.
  • Still closed: Nightclubs, movie theaters, and concert and sporting venues.

On April 27, the governor announced a six-week plan to reopen the state beginning April 30, provided a “cumulative percent of positive test results remains below 3 percent” from April 27 to April 30.

On April 30, the governor announced a new “safer-at-home” order that went into effect May 4. Restaurants can offer outdoor service. Barbershops and hair and nail salons can take appointments. Pet groomers can reopen. Places of worship can reopen. Groups of more than 25 people are prohibited.

On May 15, outdoor fishing can resume with restrictions.

On May 21, restaurants began offering indoor dining at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Indoor shopping malls and state park campgrounds began reopening.

On May 26, indoor and outdoor bars reopened at 50 percent capacity with additional guidelines. Museums and zoos reopened.

On June 5, casinos reopened with additional guidelines.

As of June 22, summer camps could reopen and outdoor graduation ceremonies could resume with additional guidelines.

On July 1, the state allowed the reopening of fairs, festivals, amusement parks and outdoor open-air concerts.

Wisconsin

  • Now open in most of the state: Bars, gyms, restaurant dine-in services, retail stores, personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops, movie theaters.
  • Still closed: Schools.

On April 20, the governor issued an order that outlined a multiphase plan to reopen Wisconsin once there is a 14-day downward trajectory of positive coronavirus cases.

On April 27, the governor said the state would allow nonessential businesses to do curbside drop-off of goods and animals, making it possible for businesses such as dog groomers and repair shops to reopen.

On May 1, the governor reopened 34 state parks and forests.

On May 11, the governor issued an order allowing stand-alone or strip-mall-based retail stores to reopen with additional restrictions.

On May 13, the Wisconsin Supreme Court’s conservative majority sided with Republican legislators and struck down the decision by Democratic Gov. Tony Evers to extend a stay-at-home order. There was some initial confusion about whether the court had granted a stay until May 20, but it appeared the decision took effect immediately. The Tavern League of Wisconsin, which represents bar owners, told its members they could open.

On May 18, the governor abandoned plans to enforce statewide coronavirus measures after the state’s top court ruled in favor of Republican lawmakers who argued that Evers’s stay-at-home order exceeded his powers. He told reporters that his office is instead consulting with local officials to help them create their own orders. The state’s two largest cities, Milwaukee and Madison, kept the regulations they already had.

On May 22, Dane County, which includes Madison, entered the first phase oh its reopening plan, which allowed bars and restaurants to reopen for dine-in service at 25 percent capacity.

On June 5, Milwaukee bars and restaurants were allowed to resume in-person service, though indoor dining must be capped at 25 percent capacity.

Wyoming

  • Now open: Restaurant dine-in services, bars and movie theaters, gyms, and personal-care businesses such as salons and barbershops.

On April 28, the governor announced that gyms, barbershops, hair salons and other personal-care businesses could reopen under specific operating conditions beginning May 1.

On May 15, movie theaters and performance venues could reopen with capacity limits. Gyms were allowed to open locker rooms. Child-care centers could have up to 25 people in a classroom. Restaurants were allowed to reopen for indoor and outdoor dining. Gatherings of more than 25 people are prohibited. National parks were allowed to reopen May 18.

On June 1, outdoor gatherings of up to 250 people were allowed.

On June 29, the governor extended public health orders to July 15.

No statewide stay-at-home order has been in place.